KTM 690 Adventure EVO2 Kit

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Frontwheel21, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. Bill the Bong

    Bill the Bong Supern00ba

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,424
    Location:
    Kalahari South Africa
    At least the tanks are pretty cheap...
  2. Bill the Bong

    Bill the Bong Supern00ba

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,424
    Location:
    Kalahari South Africa
    Mine with EVO 2 kit, 9l fuel, rally stuff (RB/ICO/CAP), heavy duty tubes and big bash plate was 170kg. I'd say the complete kit adds about 25 kg once fuelled up. Trouble is I've never weighed the stock bike... I think the best approach would be for somebody to weigh the kit in the boxes when receiving it. Subtract the box weight.

    After my last rallye I stripped off everything except the tower to do repairs, I could not believe how light it felt without all the stuff.
  3. Canadian_Bacon

    Canadian_Bacon Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    301
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Thanks so much for the feedback! I was leaning towards the top of the shroud, there is all that space up there seems like a good idea. Only I don't know how it would mount up, say with something like a Montana 600 or something similar. I'll hit up yellow pig and see if he has any input. Thanks again man!



  4. Yellow Pig

    Yellow Pig Allergic to asphalt! Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    9,314
    Location:
    SoCal -T.O.
    Here ya go: I mounted my Montana to the top of the dash with a ram ball mount. To do so you have to reinforce the bottom of the plastic dash w/ a home made bracket that ties into the rally subframe.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
  5. Canadian_Bacon

    Canadian_Bacon Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Oddometer:
    301
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    That's exactly what I was after! Thanks a million!
  6. Kalahari Surfer

    Kalahari Surfer n00b

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    4
    Location:
    Joburg
    Any photos on how to mount to aid a noob like me? :D
  7. overlandr

    overlandr Dystopist

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Oddometer:
    6,021
    Location:
    Sydney
    Sorry but what exactly happened here? Extent of any damage?? Not clear in yr photos.
  8. travelingaustralian

    travelingaustralian Globe Trotting

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    135
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    The corner of the faring pushed into the tank and split the corner open. Im going to look into getting some crash bars made up before I buy a new tank.
  9. LethPhaos

    LethPhaos Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
    Oddometer:
    659
    Location:
    Belgistan
    I had the following issue last weekend and was wondering if anyone else experienced the same, and what the solution was.
    I had filled up both front tanks and the rear one, after about 190km the low fuel light came on. I was surprised, but luckily there was a fuel station nearby, so I head for fuel. Turns out the front tanks had barely siphoned over into the rear one, they were still almost full.
    Around 180-190km is what I usually get from the rear tank alone, if I don't ride too aggressively.

    All three tanks have the breather hose with the cap on them, like this, and as supplied by RR:
    [​IMG]

    I checked the tanks a few times during the day, and they did seem to empty over time a bit, but apparently not fast enough to keep me from running out of fuel. Difference being, by opening the tank I allowed some air into them, preventing a vacuum effect which could be causing the issue.

    I checked one of the breather tubes and it's not plugged, air could pass through. I could try running the tanks with regular breather hoses (no cap) but I quite like the caps, as they prevent fuel spills when the bike is on it's side (or worse).

    Any ideas on causes or solutions?
  10. TheMuffinMan

    TheMuffinMan Forest Ranger Magnet

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9,342
    Location:
    Coeur d'Alene, ID
    With my Evo-2 tanks I find that my low fuel light comes one two times, the first time when there's 2.2 gallons left and after about 5 minutes it turns off. After that it turns off when I have about 1 gallon left in all tanks, assuming 5.5 gallons total capacity between the stock and front evo-2 tanks.

    The most I've put in was 5.3 gallons but that was with some left in the tanks. When I drop my fuel pump to modify clamps for easy field maintenance and replace my fuel filter (yearly maintenance for me) I'm going to drain all tanks and then trailer to a gas station to get an accurate volume.
  11. jm65

    jm65 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2011
    Oddometer:
    296
    Location:
    Alpes-France

    hi Ktmmitch

    some news for fork and rear shock extension kits 2014 ? :wink:

    thanks
  12. ktmmitch

    ktmmitch Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,629
    Location:
    uk
    Our Tractive Shocks work with 2014 models, so no problem if you want to add performance or height, but it will take longer to do the forks
  13. finbarr

    finbarr Would be adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    327
    Location:
    London, UK
    Hi there - I've just finished installing my EVO2 Adv tank and fairing kits to my 2014 690. All went well, but I thought I'd share a few observations that may help others.

    By in large, the whole process was very straightforward - the only issues came from my decision to not attach the wiring loom end point to the tower at the default point, on the side. The reason for this is that it severely restricts the turning radius of the front wheel as the right fork legs bangs straight in to it. I opted to mount it on top of the main support, where the two spaced bolts attach the black 'bat wing' panel from above. This meant that various cables wouldn't quite reach the attachment points that are provided, so I made a couple of small mounting brackets from aluminium to solve the issue. Ultimately, this was pretty trivial to sort out and I'm glad I got to preserve my turning circle!

    I'd read reports earlier in this thread about rubbing and paint coming off, so to avoid this and the potential for corrosion which might follow, I bought a bicycle tube and cut this up and zip tied bits of it to various places to absorb vibration and reduce rubbing. Tanks are very solid and completely vibration free. Very happy with this.

    Next up, I wanted to solve the issue of the low beam being too low. I tried adjusting the head lamp unit as others have mentioned here earlier and I too found this prevents the fairing from fitting properly, so that was out. I took the headlight unit apart (and swapped the bulbs out for better performance ones) and found it was easy enough to unmount the low beam headlamp unit, add a couple of washers on the top two mounting bolts and re-assemble - this fixed the problem. I noticed while I had the unit open that wiring is pretty cheap and several connections were loose and and likely to fail under vibration - so I replaced most of the wiring with better spec connectors and re-assembled - all is now good.

    Lastly, I wasn't happy with the poor fit of the fibreglass front panel matching up to the two side panels. I fixed this by getting some split rubber tubing and pushing it on to the edge of the fibreglass all the way around. This does two jobs - it reduces vibration and fills the gaps between the panels. This looks so good I decided to fit it around the side panels in the cockpit area to finish things off. Very happy with the result.

    I trimmed down the black plastic pieces that used to fit around the ignition key so that they would still fit and zip tied these in place. I was mainly concerned with the exposed ignition wiring and wanted to remove temptation.
    The tanks I have are the neutral ones - I went for these so it would be easy to see the fuel level in them - they appear almost white, so that's worked out well. I like the completely white look of the bike, but have the RR graphics and will probably fit these over the weekend - although I'm not sure about the Dakar logo on the front - that's a bit much I think. Also note that I painted the inside of the fibreglass panels matte black to reduce glare and just to finish things off a bit better.

    I'll post some pictures of all this in the following post.

    Cheers,
    Fin.
  14. finbarr

    finbarr Would be adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2010
    Oddometer:
    327
    Location:
    London, UK
    Here are some pics which illustrate my points above (I hope).
    Happy to take more pics and post on request if clarification is needed.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
    wylie348 likes this.
  15. johnno950

    johnno950 Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,918
    Looks terrific finbarr,the white colour sets the rig off nicley.
  16. gen

    gen Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2002
    Oddometer:
    808
    Location:
    Asia

    Would love a photo of which connectors you replaced.

    Have you also looked into replacing the R/R with a MOSFET unit? Many of us have done that. I have a Shingenden unit waiting to go in myself.

    G
  17. emilio700

    emilio700 Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 23, 2013
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    SoCal
    Only done a short local ride on full tanks to check for leaks, rubbing, etc. All seems good. Front end doesn't feel a bunch heavier. You feel it when changing direction abruptly at lower speeds. Overall, not objectionable.

    Approximate weights
    7.6 lbs kit as installed
    .7 lbs RR radiator shrouds
    -1.9 lbs OEM side covers
    8.3 lbs empty
    15 lbs 9.5L gas
    23.3 lbs full

    My notes:
    Overall, the instructions are good, but not great. A few things glossed over and not entirely up to date. I have had to write detailed instructions and service manuals for many products over the years so I'm especially critical of key omissions and errors.

    Only a tad wider than the OEM shrouds. Still easy to slide forward on seat for tight turns on dirt.

    My kit included two short pieces of hose for the vents but no vent tube caps. If that's intentional, it seems a bit cheap.

    The RR accessory shrouds are chopper gun FRP. Both heavy and fragile for what they are. For $145 I expected hand laid FRP that would weigh half as much and be far more flexible.

    Both tanks only contacted the bike at the mounting bosses but were within 2-3mm at the trailing edge. Nice. My feeling is that some flex could occur and cause the tanks to rub on the frame at the back ends. So I added a few pieces of silicone rad hose as insulators, being careful not to actually preload the tanks.

    I wasn't comfortable with either the fuel line non-insulated nor the minimal insulation on the underside of the left tank. I added some Thermo-Tec adhesive backed insulation to the underside and 1/2" tube insulation sleeve for the left side fuel line. I didn't run the fuel line through the boss in the back of the cylinder head as the instructions indicated. That seemed like a bad idea. I also didn't use the two guides and bolt included. Mostly because they weren't mentioned in the instructions and I was OK with the routing I came up with.

    Pre-installed RR insulation
    [​IMG]

    My overzealous insulation
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Rectifier seemed inadequately insulated from header so I sandwiched some 1/8" gasket material between the mounting plate and rectifier. Then I used more of the Thermo-Tec adhesive backed stuff on the plate itself.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I was concerned about my boot chafing on the fuel line so I ran it next to the shock. I don't know if RR does it this way but it works for me. Several zip ties to make damn sure it doesn't flop into the spring.
    [​IMG]

    The really pretty RR coil bracket was not needed on my bike. Wasted about 4hrs trying to figure out what I was doing wrong until I simply set it on the bench and tried it without the bracket. Voila. Not thrilled with having to subsidize bracket production for the models that actually require it.
    [​IMG]

    The natural path of the KTMT (4" extended) throttle cables had them laying across the bolt heads of the right frame mount. No bueno. I raised them up above the mounts and secured with zip ties.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    luloadventure likes this.
  18. sideup

    sideup Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    450
    Location:
    Columbia Gorge, USA
    [​IMG]
    https://sideup.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/Evo-2-tank-skid-protector/i-qS3V5wK/0/M/DSC00051-M.jpg

    I will throw this out there if anyone is interested in making some tank protectors for the Evo 2 Rally Raid tanks. I read that Rally Raid might be making some and that will be great. But these kydex material tank protectors are so simple to make.
    1)Go to your local plastics store and purchase some PVC sheet material. (.093 thickness) There are different brands and I have found they all work. Kydex is a trademark for one brand. This material is also used for pistol holsters, knife sheaths, etc.
    2) Drain the gas out of your tanks and lay them on your kitchen counter on some soft backing right next to your kitchen oven.
    3) Take some blue painter masking tape and cover the area on your tank where you want your protector. A single layer of tape if fine as it is just protects the tanks from marking up.
    4) With a utility knife score the plastic sheeting . cut out (2) 8 by 7 inch pieces. Just score it and the bend it over a counter edge and it will snap in two.
    5) Get your wife's favorite cookie sheet, and lay a piece of parchment paper on the cookie sheet and place 1 of your plastic sheets on it. Heat your oven to 250 degrees F.
    6) Put on your winter leather riding gloves. In about 8 to ten minutes open your oven and lift up the parchment paper. If the plastic bends like a wet noodle it is ready.
    7) This is where you have to be quick. Take the plastic off the cookie sheet and quickly carefully grab it with your gloves (don't let the edges touch or they will stick together) and place it on your tank. Quickly form it around the tank. I place the back piece where I want it and then grab the front corner and stretch it around the front corner piece. That front corner has tight radius so if you just drape it will create a fold. And hold the plastic in the shape for about a minute.
    8) If your not fast enough just place it in the oven again a start over. This material is cheap so if you mess one up it is no big deal. Start a new piece, but just let your tank get back to room temp again. The PVC cools so quickly, your tank will never get that hot. The piece is molded , let cool.
    9) Fit the piece to your tank (I like to mount the tank back on the bike first) Masking tape your trim line, use your dremel tool with a diamond metal cutting wheel trim it up. Finish the edges,radius the corners with a belt sander , drill a hole where the front mounting screw is. I put some double back duct tape on the flats of the guard just to secure the front and the back.
    10) If you got an area that needs some re forming just heat that area up with a heat gun and reform with your leather glove.
    I have also made forks guards with this material that look as good our better than mass produced item.
    Disclaimer: use common sense , don't put your gas tank in the oven or anything like that. :wink:

    Attached Files:

  19. sideup

    sideup Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    450
    Location:
    Columbia Gorge, USA
    another photo -before trimming

    Attached Files:

  20. sideup

    sideup Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    450
    Location:
    Columbia Gorge, USA
    one more - can't seem to upload more than one photo per post.

    Attached Files: