KTM 690 Auxiliary Fuel Tank

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by rade, Mar 29, 2014.

  1. WhereTheHellIsJames?

    WhereTheHellIsJames? Brraaaappp!!

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    Glad to hear that for some folks it worked out. @BigWally ...can you take some pics of where the air temp sensor is on your air box, as well as the connection of air box to throttle body? Also, how about pulling the airbox, and showing where your wiring harness is located on your bike? Might help others.
  2. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Regrets, I really don’t want to undo & redo all that to take pics. I’ll add more details here first and if pics are still required then I’ll reconsider.
    Sensor attachment is opposite side from crankcase breather tube (Rade’s image shows same side - may have been a prototype). I shortened the breather tube a couple inches and plugged right in. Sensor wiring long enough to loop into final position w/o modification.
    Double-sleeve air intake-throttle body connector: downstream end fully seated over throttle body intake, upstream end over the airbox outlet. Need to get airbox fully seated down the tube into that collar or it won’t fit into its allotted space. This pushes the air inlet end of the air intake tube right up near the air filter. Position clamp fasteners so can tighten one from each side. If they’re not positioned right they’ll interfere with getting the airbox fully down into position. Ie the airbox will rest on the clamp fasteners which rest on whatever is directly beneath them, but when all parts are fully seated the airbox is essentially suspended by that double collar on the throttle body and is completely nestled down within its allotted space. A snug fit but it does fit.
    I think the wiring harness resides in the space behind the battery but I could be wrong on that point.
    Hope that helps.
    beemer chuck likes this.
  3. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Sequence can be important.
    Attach the sensor before final positioning of airbox. Orient the breather fitting to allow sliding the breather tube onto it either before or after final airbox positioning, whichever is easier. Rade’s directions mention this sequence but I had to torture myself with my own approach first.
    Then persuade the airbox down and forward into position. It’ll fit snugly and you’ll know when its home.
    Then attach the air filter/frame assembly. I think Rade’s directions mount the air filter assembly to the airbox prior to fitting the airbox to the throttle body. I found it easier to grip/persuade the airbox into position with the foam filter out of the way. Didn’t use any lube but a tiny bit strategically applied might help here or there.
  4. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    James - I couldn't upload more pics to your PM so am responding back here on the original thread.

    Your current airbox is like the one in Rade's image (see website), crankcase breather tube & sensor connections on the same side. Your first one, and mine, have them on opposite sides.
    And I was wrong about my wiring harness location. See pic, mine runs down directly in front of the battery and behind the airbox.
    **Note that I have a WPS LiFe battery which may provide a bit more space than the OEM? This could be an important distinction, not sure. My bike had the LiFe battery when I purchased it. Amazingly light.
    And the wiring loop to the sensor fits alongside then loops forward to then angle back directly in line with the sensor mount position on the lower right side.

    The big hose clamp fasteners on the dual-flange air intake-throttle body were my main interference factor. They rested on whatever is directly beneath the airbox and held the assembly up out of position by the width (~5-6mm or so). Once they were loosened and rotated out of the way the airbox was able to squeeze down/forward onto the throttle body. Then had to tighten the clamp fasteners from outside the frame, one from each side.
    The other must-do for me was to be sure and get the airbox to slide all the down into its home channel in the bottom of the upper dual-flange housing.
    Here are a couple more pics.

    Wiring harness in front of battery (note WPS LiFe battery may be smaller than OEM and provide needed space). Sensor wire looping down right side of airbox to then loop down to the sensor mounting location in a nice straight shot (can't see in pic).
    IMG_0796.jpg

    Crankcase breather tube straight shot onto airbox connector on left side.
    IMG_0798.jpg

    Dual-flange airbox-throttle body fully seated on throttle body. These hose clamp fasteners were creating interference with seating the airbox down/forward onto the throttle body until I rotated them out of the way which then requires them to be tightened from the outside, one from each side. Once I could seat the airbox down that extra 5-7mm I was also able to slide the assembly (dual-flange) down/forward onto the throttle body in a nice snug fit.
    IMG_0801.jpg

    When you revisit this installation it'd be nice to know if the front hanger can be retained or if it actually interferes with settling the front of the tank down onto the ABS pump, which has a small vertical projection that is the only forward resting point for the tank and I'd feel better having it rest on the hanger if it'll fit.
  5. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Btw I ordered 3 of these upgrade kits and one of the other riders will be installing the other two units in a week or two. He or I will pass along any additional potentially useful observations. All of our airboxes have the breather tube/sensor attachment points on opposite sides of the airbox from each other.
  6. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Good write- up. Keep and eye on the tank
    Good write up. I suggest you keep a close watch on the tank it is touching another component. Vibration will do serious damage to things that touch.
  7. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    I also removed the rear hanger before installing the airbox. Then replaced the hanger afterwards. Buys you a bit more wiggle room.
  8. rade

    rade Adventure enthusiast

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    Hello,

    I am sorry, but it is out our possibilities to have 690E all production years here... so time to time we learn the differences only from you - our customers...

    We have realised the Y2012 and younger has a bit different OEM flange. Our small airbox was designed to fit the "ABS version" OEM flange. Who has Y2012 and younger we advise you to buy from KTM the new flange and two hose clamps. Here are the parts numbers (it is cost of 40EUR):

    INTAKEFLANGE76506026100

    HOSECLAMP60-80MM55006028000

    HOSECLAMP50-70MM51006027000

    Thanks for understanding.
    Rade

    p.s. in March we will work hard on our install guides that are bad now - my apologies
    Anders- likes this.
  9. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Well my journey with my '15 690E ABS wasn't complete after all...
    I asked Rade if the front tank hanger can in fact be removed and not replaced since his instructions say
    • NOTE: This kit does not require a separate/new front tank bracket for the new tank to rest on; rather, it simply sits on top of the horizontal frame tube already in place (see red arrow in the pic below, right).
    He replied that "of course both hangers must be in place" but that the comment excerpted above "applies only to the Husky 701". It would have been really nice to have provided that important distinction in the instructions...

    So I got to take the entire system apart (again) and replace the front tank hanger. Those who had the original Rade aux tank might remember that getting the fuel connector on the bottom of the tank to clear the front hanger to get the tank into final position was a tight squeeze. That hasn't changed (all but the rear end of the upgrade tank is the same shape as the original). I swore it couldn't be done but after a delightful profusion of colorful language with emphatic inflections and obscene body language to enhance the effect, I finally determined I had to remove the airbox assembly (again) and rear hanger (again - and i had just replaced it after elongating the mounting bracket holes to get a bit more forward reach so the rear of the tank will actually, barely, rest upon it). All this so the rear of the tank can be lowered sufficiently to raise the front of the tank/fuel connector enough
    to allow it to clear the front hanger.
    Then its a bona fide blue ballin bitch to squeeze the tank forward/down thru the frame and into final position. I found applying a bit of a twist at the right moment did the trick.
    Tip: leave the front hanger mounting bolts slightly less than fully tight (but not so loose the bolt will turn when you finally tighten it from outside the frame with no opportunity to hold the other end of the bolt from turning) so the hanger can be moved a bit (long screwdriver) to facilitate noodling it under the fuel connector while also teasing the fuel line out of the hanger and connector's way while also squeezing the tank forward/down with a twist...then when everything is in its happy place tighten the front hanger nylok nuts the rest of the way (from outside the frame on each side). Woe be to he whose bolts then want to turn and not let the nut tighten...

    Then the airbox assembly can be mounted to the throttle body.

    Then the rear tank hanger can be replaced.

    A couple more pics:

    The frame cross member that apparently projects forward sufficiently ONLY ON THE HUSKY 701 to let the front of the tank rest on it. It DOES NOT project far enough forward on my 690 to serve that purpose - hence the reinstallation of the front tank hanger and its attendant joys. At least now I know the tank is properly supported...I was uncomfortable with it only resting atop the little power plug on top of the ABS pump in the absence of the front hanger.
    IMG_0805.jpg

    Per James request, a (bad) pic trying to show the location of the sensor connection to the airbox. Lower right side - opposite the side which has the crankcase breather tube connection. You are looking rearward from beneath the airbox on the right side.
    IMG_0809.jpg

    Also per James request a pic of the front of the airbox and the dual-flange connector fully seated on both the throttle body and the airbox.
    IMG_0808.jpg

    Updated conclusions:
    1) Everything is a tight fit, but it does fit.
    2) Rade has done a good job of maximizing fuel volume while making air filter access for servicing far simpler. Those benefits come with the tight-fit caveat and the need for patience and creativity during installation.
    3) The installation instructions aren't ready for prime time.
    As a recovering/retired technical writer perhaps I can help him out with that (if he asks). I'm sure I could at least improve his ability to curse creatively, and at length without repetition, in English.
  10. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Perhaps the reason the upgrade fuel connector is so much more difficult to get past the hanger is its shape, size and orientation. Its a right angle instead of vertical. When vertical it’s vertical it’s effectively further forward which helps more than one might imagine. Its tightly fastened at a diagonal angle right-rearward which appreciably increases it’s effective size in that dimension resulting in having to force the tank further forward to clear the hanger before the tank can be moved lower - which it must be in order to move forward. Therein comes the rub...
    If one could loosen the connector’s fastener (a big nut in the bottom of the inside of the tank), and reorient the connector to exit straight right it would 1)regain some needed rearward clearance for the hanger to clear the connector (allow moving the tank downward sooner), and 2)be an even straighter path for the fuel line on its way to in front of the ABS lines and then rearward to the petcock. (Note to Rade for subsequent production).
    Warning; venturing a socket at the end of 2 extensions down into the bowels of said tank in hope of reaching said fuel connector locking nut to loosen/reorient it as proposed may result in premature separation of 1st and 2nd extension leaving 2nd extension and attached socket to nestle into their new home inside said tank. And there’s a fairly deep inside flange surrounding said fuel filler hole that is excruciatingly effective at deflecting both ends of said long object from being reachable, grasped or otherwise retrieved back through said hole. Ask me how I know.
    Oh well it was the wrong size socket anyway even though a 19mm barely fit through said hole. Must need a thin-walled 20mm? I’ll run by the asylum now and see if they might have one i can borrow..and if my room might be ready
    abandoned track likes this.
  11. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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  12. hansi

    hansi Teurer Abenteurer Supporter

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    Just learned about the Rade tank upgrade and ordered a kit right away. I've had the Rade on my 09 now for about 2 years and to be honest had some troubles with it, mainly not draining fast enough into the main tank, even after drilling the required holes in the pump sleeve. Also the rubber gasket for the drain fitting deteriorated and left rubber chunks in the bottom of the tank.
    I converted the Rade into a siphon tank like the X tank, connecting it to the vent of the main tank and that has been working for me pretty well as long as the main tank stays airtight . I really love the tank for getting me the 200 mile range without porking up the svelte form of the 690 and I'm really excited about the upgrade with the easily accessible air filter since I really dislike the K&N or the UNI filter for the cumbersome maintenance. Good job Rade
  13. Scootfast

    Scootfast n00b

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    Worth noting - this instruction PDF is on the 690 page but it details a 701 installation which is very similar but not the same... (see previous comments about front bracket)
  14. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    Rade tells me that a 19mm “side-key” can be used to loosen the fuel connector externally to reorient it. I assume this is a very thin open end wrench.
  15. hansi

    hansi Teurer Abenteurer Supporter

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    20180227_150020.jpg
    @ BigWally, refering to the new Rade tank upgrade kit: Did you trimm of the extra rubber of the intake boot that is sticking into the new air filter box shown in the pic or did you leave it just like that?
    Would it have any negative impact if this would be trimmed back?
  16. BigWally

    BigWally Been here awhile

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    I did no trimming. The peaked air filter/cage assembly sets over the entire intake boot area in a seemingly space-adequate, secure and sealed manner so I saw no need to intervene.
  17. hansi

    hansi Teurer Abenteurer Supporter

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    Thank you
  18. Swashbuckler

    Swashbuckler Been here awhile

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    Hey all. I opted for the Rade Tank for my new 2017 690. I had a 2012 690 when it came out and I didn’t hold onto it long because of the lack of extra fuel options. I tried a rotopax, but ended up having to deal with that issue halfway through the White Rim Trail. I ended up with the Husky 501 for the past couple years and immediately added the 4.1 tank, which was perfect for Colorado adventure riding as well as getting me around the UTBdr and the CObdr. I’m back on a 690 and I need the 200 mile range. The Rade tank is a no-brainer.

    B69BEC77-8023-4315-97BC-E3F1CFBEF5DC.jpeg 991AE43C-4DC9-443A-94D7-9962EDD5BF32.jpeg 4AAA3836-1358-4ABD-B111-249DE82A5EE3.jpeg
  19. Swashbuckler

    Swashbuckler Been here awhile

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    I read through this thread and knew that this would be a tight installation, but mine seemed a bit easy. I only used the supplied KTM 690 toolkit with a couple extra tools. The installation is relatively logical. The instructions on Rade’s site are helpful, but aren’t detailed, so I did have to make a few educated guesses. The supplied hoses are full length so you’ll be cutting those yourself, as well as decideing the best exact routing options.
    B4ED9B14-6EB4-494A-B2DF-0F452B3B8819.jpeg B6226FA8-6E75-4D28-84CB-34EF796B82A9.jpeg BA84DDEA-3DEE-496E-ADC1-D9F401C8683B.jpeg F727C617-51C5-4F79-A1BB-3332F6ED8A91.jpeg
  20. Swashbuckler

    Swashbuckler Been here awhile

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    I didn’t weigh anything, but I’d guess the Rade setup weighs as much as the stock airbox.

    Airbox Removal is simple. The bolts are hidden, but are easily accessible once you find them. You’ll need to remove the r/r on the right side to access that front right bolt.

    84EE265F-7245-4956-B046-87546E9051CB.jpeg A05F1104-67AF-4588-A1AC-944287CEA5D9.jpeg CBB7FC43-4A62-49B7-ADE4-77365EA5DC1C.jpeg 7C13464A-1CD3-4E28-B6B8-9EFC6E014139.jpeg