KTM 690 Enduro R sprocket change advice needed

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by SportsGuy, Apr 23, 2015.

  1. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    I'm ok giving up some highway performance to get a bit better performance offroad. I simply want to have to feather the clutch less on single/double tracks. Not covering any real high speed miles, but I'm not after dramatic changes either. I mean, I can truck the bike over a distance, but may still need to cover onroad sections between trails - so typical dual sport stuff.

    New chain is OK if needed.

    Stock is 15/45 on the bike, I understand. After searching for an hour last night, the only real understanding I have is:

    1 - some think a 14 tooth front sprocket is the way to go, others disagree
    2 - a 48 tooth rear sprocket might be a useful swap, but I only came across one real reference and very little experience shared on that swap

    The search feature here cuts out most of the phrases that'd help me find data, but even expanding to Bing & Google didn't get me much more clarity. Sigh.

    Thoughts on what a step or two down looks like? I'm not looking to turn the 690 into a single-track-only hooligan (it's a tad large for that anyway), but I'd love to have to feather the clutch less in the tight stuff. If I lose 10 mph off the top, oh well...the bike shakes it's head over 65/70 anyway making me want to enjoy the back roads and not the interstates. :)

    And...if I'm doing this swap, are we talking a straight unbolt/bolt on operation, or are there other things I should look for or have on hand to complete things properly. I saw a reference to flipping a mount to increase the clearance under the chain guard, so I'll watch to see if that applies. Another reference was to add two links to the chain, but I'm unclear what sprocket/tooth combo that was being applied to, so it may/may not be a factor for me...

    Appreciate the help gang.

    The patient (as if you didn't know what a 690 Enduro R looked like!)...since stripped of her rotopax gear...She's back to more serious dirt use as the Super Tenere in the garage next to her is the mile muncher.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. The Letter J

    The Letter J Long timer

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    I guess I'm not sure what the question is? I use 14/15/16 tooth fronts and now just a 50 tooth rear (finally wore out my 48.)

    I use 14/50 when I'm trucking it somewhere and don't plan to be on the highway at all, though I've done a few 200-300 mile days with that gearing it's not the most highway friendly! Allegedly you can fit a 13 on the front as long as you have at least a 50 on the rear, otherwise it will eat the chain slider, I might give that a try just for fun but it is certain to be useless on the street.

    I use 15/50 (currently on the bike) for general dualsport and trail riding and I don't mind riding hundreds of miles at a time with this gearing as long as I don't need to be going 80+ the whole time.

    I use 16/50 when we are planning longer days, but it is slightly lower than stock and I don't mind using it offroad as long as we're not trying to cross the Rubicon (I used 14/48 for that!)

    As you can see, all of my gearing combo's are lower than stock and the bike can still break 100mph with any of them (14/50 would only go 96mph with the stock 8400rpm rev limiter, my rev limiter is set to 8800rpm.) You can fit 14/15/16 with a 48 with 2 links longer than the stock chain, I just replaced my chain again and went 4 links longer than stock but I have to max out the chain adjusters to fit 14/50.

    Go here: http://www.gearingcommander.com/ and you can play with different setups to see what your RPM/speed will be with different combinations... I would suggest just trying a 14 front for now since it is not too drastic of a change and you won't need to change your chain.

    I don't know if you actually wanted to see what it looks like, but here is a 50 on the rear:

    [​IMG]
    #2
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  3. The Letter J

    The Letter J Long timer

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    BTW, your passenger peg brackets are on the wrong sides. :D
    #3
  4. wbbnm

    wbbnm Long timer

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    Why don't you just try a 14 tooth front sprocket and see if you like it?

    If it is too low, then try a slightly larger rear.

    In my experience no two people ride the same and choosing sprockets should be done to suit your needs.
    #4
  5. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    Thanks guys. Looks like maybe the 14 tooth front might be the way to start for me. Completely understand the point on testing/trying to see what actually works in my instance, too. Makes sense.

    Footrest brackets...yeah...um...sure...thanks for playing.
    #5
  6. The Letter J

    The Letter J Long timer

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    Totally serious.
    #6
  7. RuckedUp

    RuckedUp Long timer

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    I'm trying to wear out my 48 rear ring so I can go back to stock 45. I'll keep the 14 in the front that should be about right. I went low for the sand while I was in FL and that was just a bit to low for me. Gave up to much on the highway when needed.
    #7
  8. TexaNate

    TexaNate Been here awhile

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    I have two sets of wheels, so I have a rear sprocket on the rear wheel specific for single-track. It's 47T. Bear in mind most of the EXC sprockets have the same mounting pattern, and they're usually a lot easier to find than ones advertised as being for the 690. I got mine for around $45 shipped, and it was one of them fancy aluminum/steel combos.

    With 15/47, I'm comfy at 45-55mph, which is as fast as I ride with this sprocket.

    In the manual you'll find necessary info for lowering the lower chain guard if required. I did order a 120-link chain to accommodate the larger sprocket - flipping the axle blocks did not make me enough slack with the stock chain. I shortened the chain to suit, if memory serves.

    On one hand, I don't like the close ratio box on this bike...but boy do I love the clutch. So, when in doubt, gear a little high - the clutch is like butter anyway, and it can handle the abuse.
    #8
  9. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    Thanks Nate.

    Interestingly, my biggest beef isn't with the actual clutch work. That's a side benefit, though I will confess to being concerned about the clutch and the "abuse" I give it.

    One of the things I'm seeking to address with this change is my inability to loft the front of the bike. Tried like crazy in our training class last June and without dumping the clutch, I simply couldn't get the thing more than an inch off the ground.

    Part of that was traction limits in the grassy field, but even the instructor was challenged on my bike.

    Now, admittedly, this could just be down to technique, too...or lack thereof. But I could never seem to get the traction scenario just right to manage a proper loft.

    So along with the reduced clutching, this could help with practicing technique.
    #9
  10. juno

    juno Long timer

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    Damn, I had to learn to not loft it in the first three gears!
    I am also not a fan of the CR gearbox but the bike will start my 200lbs + gear azz off in second in deep sand, as long as it is not buried.
    The only issue I have noticed with slipping the clutch is the coolant fan runs more but never gets too hot.
    The front sprocket change is relatively straight forward. If you can go back and forth with a tooth difference without changing the chain I would try that first.
    #10
  11. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    The last reply here brings up my next question:

    Can I run the stock chain with a 14 tooth front sprocket?

    Got my sprocket last week, and easy enough to buy another chain if needed, or work a link or two out of the stock one, I suppose...
    #11
  12. francs

    francs Been here awhile

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    Yes.
    Check chain guide (on swingarm near sprocket) for wear regularly.
    #12
  13. DesertRatliff

    DesertRatliff Tinker Tinker Ride Ride

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    Just my quick take:

    I bought a lightly used 2010 690 last summer. Fell in love with everything but the CR gearbox and false neutrals. Everything on the bike was stock, so I had no reason to believe the gearing was any different. After some trail work, I had plans to go down to a 14T up front and when I went to do so, was surprised that the PO had already done that (I had to re-count several times in disbelief).

    What I'm getting at, is that 14/45 isn't geared low enough for my taste. Bike hums along at 70-75, but when things are tight, I feel I want a lower first and second. My plan is to go 14/48 for everyday riding, then go up to 16T up front when I have to make miles. And I've heard with the proper length chain, you just have to flip the chain adjusters.

    I just need to see if there's a reusable CS nut available so I don't have to wear out the lock washer bending it back and forth all the time.
    #13
  14. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    Thanks francs! :)

    ...what is a "CS nut"...? I think I know, but really, if I'm honest, I'm guessing...
    <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->
    #14
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  15. DesertRatliff

    DesertRatliff Tinker Tinker Ride Ride

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    [​IMG]

    CS=countershaft sprocket. Sorry 'bout that. If you look, there's a washer you have to bend flat to get the nut free and then bend back to lock. A few of those cycles and the washer is done-for. Eagle Mike offers a "prevailing torque nut" for the KLR650 that doesn't require bending the washer back and forth. Wondering if there's something like that available for 690's.

    ttp://eaglemike.com/Prevailing-torque-nut-PTN.htm
    #15
  16. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second... Super Supporter

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    Passenger pegs are on the wrong sides....
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  17. SportsGuy

    SportsGuy icanhazdirt?

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    So I've been told. ;)

    I can state for a fact it doesn't affect the performance of the bike. :)
    #17
  18. JerryMac

    JerryMac Been here awhile

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    Resurrecting a year old thread. I couldn't find a locking countershaft nut for the 690 so I made one. The stock one is aluminum and is technically only designed for one use, but you can take that with a grain of salt. The washer that has to be bent over is also a pain. The steel prevailing torque nut sold by Eagle Mike for KLR 650s (also on Amazon, the link is above), is the correct thread (M20) but is too thick. So I cut about .150 inches off the side which is to mate to the sprocket. Then on the same side I ground relief about .1 inches deep and at a diameter of about one inch for clearance to avoid interference with the splines on the shaft. Then I found a washer to replace the stock one with the inside diameter of one inch and an outside diameter of one and a half inches. The final thickness of the nut should be between 7/16 and 1/2 inch, and the washer should be about 1/8 inch thick or slightly more. I used a knife to remove burrs on the threads of the nut. The nut requires a 30mm socket or wrench as opposed to the stock 27mm. The nut should be torqued to 59 ft lbs. It is imperative that the threads on the nut do not run into the splines on the shaft otherwise you will probably have an oil leak. I also added blue lock tite for security. If you have the stock sprocket cover check that the outside of the nut does not rub. It helps to be a machinist or mechanic but it can be done with a vice, hacksaw, bench grinder, die grinder, file and calipers.
    #18
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  19. DrKayak

    DrKayak Retro Rider

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    Anyone know if you can run a 15/48 with the OE chain? I have a 48t from my 450. If I have to buy a chain I will get a 14cs instead.

    thanks.
    #19
  20. francs

    francs Been here awhile

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    I'll say no (I didn't tried it) . I run 15/48 with 116 link chain (+2).
    #20