KTM 690 Troubleshooting Guide

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by El Ponkin, Dec 6, 2014.

  1. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Introduction.

    My attempt here is to produce a usable troubleshooting guide to help people through the eccentricities of the 690.

    I will placemat the first 15 posts in this thread so that I can put sections up as I finish them and keep all the facts on the first page of the thread. I have read numerous forums and threads to gather this info and my attempt here is to collate the information into one place in a logical sequence to save you the effort of searching, like I had too. I am not claiming to be an expert I am just acting as a conduit to gather the knowledge of multiple forums and posts into one place.

    Some information will be incomplete and some may be incorrect, the idea is that I post it up and people can PM me corrections or additional information so it builds into a concise and accurate guide.

    If you have questions you can post them up, but make sure the answer is NOT already covered in the guide first and then the collective can come up with the answer and I can add it to the guide.

    Also check out my other guide which goes into greater depth with the Electronic Fuel Injection System and use of TuneECU Program for mapping:
    KTM 690 EFI - Idiots Guide

    My Build Thread also covers many issues I have faced in the life of my 2011 690 so far.
    My Original KTM 690 Rally Raid Build and History So Far


    Disclaimer

    Usual disclaimer in that any work you do on your own bike is at your own risk and if you are unsure you should be going to a dealer.
    If your bike is in warranty anything you do here will void your warranty.
    This guide is to help those who are mechanically efficient and computer literate who just want the facts in one place, the guide will not make you an engineer overnight. Don't mess with your bike unless you are completely confident you know what you are doing and have fully researched the subject.


    General.

    Understand that these bikes are electronically fuel injected and this requires a different set of troubleshooting rules to what you may be used to on a carbureted bike. The basics are however, the same,you still need four things to make this thing go, all in the right order and quantities.

    · Fuel
    · Air
    · Ignition
    · Compression


    Modern motorcycles are fairly reliable and they generally do not break without a reason.
    Most issues are caused by the person/s who works on the bike, "self-induced".
    If you have a breakdown, retrace your steps and ask what was done to the bike recently that has caused this.

    The 690 has issues with fuel quality and operation of the fuel pump because of the EFI sensitivity.
    The rear filler design and the minute fuel injector nozzle mean that crap can get in and stop the bike.
    In normal use the pump attracts a grey residue from the fuel tank material that will eventually block filters. Also the plumbing of the pump can get kinked lines and electrical connectors can work loose. Preventative measures will help you eradicate all pump and injector issues and make diagnosis much easier (Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on preventative measures) Click Here.

    EFI systems are electrically controlled and driven, fault monitoring circuits therefore can only detect electrical faults and monitor for extremes i.e. open circuit or short circuit. If a sensor is misreading it will not be detected as a fault until its parameters go outside of set limits. If any sensors go outside limits you will get a flashing FI light and the KTM operators manual will be able to interpret the "blink" code which is kind of like "morse" code from the FI light blinking so many long and short blinks.

    If you have a mechanical fault, a sensor reading incorrectly or an incorrectly adjusted sensor there will be no warning. If you have a combination of a couple of faults it can get very hard to diagnose, particularly if you are dealership mechanic on a tight timeframe servicing a multitude of weaponry you simply won't have the time to get fully up to speed on one particular model. My thoughts are that you as the owner need to become an expert.

    As KTM use a specific KTM diagnostics box to read and adjust the ECUs the price is inhibitive for the general home mechanic however some bright spark came up with a program called TuneECU, this is a worthwhile investment to assist troubleshooting. Unfortunately 2014 onwards have a different single ECU which cannot yet be accessed by TuneECU and therefore owners will need their dealership to utilise the KTM Diagnostic tool on these newer models.
    (Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on set up and use of TuneECU)
    Click here.

    PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE:

    The more you do to eliminate potential sources of failure before you go riding then the easier it is to diagnose faults when it does break.
    Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on Preventative Maintenance to Bulletproof your 2008-2013 KTM 690. Click Here.

    WARNING:

    DO NOT spray EFI related plugs with water dispersant (WD40) as it can vary the minute voltages used in EFI systems, just use isopropyl alcohol sprays and air dry.
    DO NOT use a pressure washer to clean your bike EVER, EVER
    #1
  2. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Index of Faults

    For each fault below refer to the referenced fault tables A to L

    1. The FI light came on - B, H, K
    2. The engine wont idle and runs erratically - A, H, I, J, K, L, C
    3. The engine starts but then shuts down on its own without an FI light - A, E, H, I, J, K, L, C
    4. The engine will not start at all - D, E, H, I, J, K, L
    5. The engine takes a few presses before it starts - F
    6. Noise from the engine - G
    7. Clutch does not operate - M
    8. Low oil pressure light illuminates at idle - N
    #2
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  3. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table A - EFI Basics

    Carry out the following basic EFI test/resets as they will fix a lot of minor issues:

    • Throttle calibration - This re-calibrates the start & stop position of the throttle grip. Turn the ignition on but don't start. Wait for the tacho needle to return to zero. Then turn the throttle grip gradually from close to open and back from open to closed. Don't let it snap shut. Turn the ignition off, done.
    • Idle reset procedure - The 'famous' 15 minute idle reset procedure - This is only possible if the engine will sustain idle long enough to do this reset, if it won't then continue with the other fault tables and come back to this once you have got the engine idling. This procedure resets the adaptive base values of the ECU. It won't transform the bike but it can make a worthwhile improvement. It is very important that the engine is stone cold. One or two hours after riding is not enough! Do this after the bike has been off for a full night or day. Start the engine and let it idle for 15 minutes without touching anything. After 15 minutes, switch the engine off with the ignition key. Done. During this procedure you won't see or hear anything happening besides the idling and (probably) the fan. Don't worry, the reset is done. Besides after certain maintenance or parts replacement, you could consider doing it twice a year with the turning of the seasons. A reset for the colder autumn & winter period and one time for warmer conditions during spring & summer. This is not mandatory or needed and don't expect miracles. If the engine will not idle you can use the program TuneECU to reset adaptations.
    #3
  4. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table B - EFI - FI Light Flashes

    If any sensors go outside limits you will get a flashing FI light. The light will be on constant at anything above idle so you need to throttle back to idle to get the light to flash the code. The KTM Owner's manual has the fault code tables to interpret the "blink" code which is kind of like "morse" code from the FI light blinking so many long and short blinks.
    NOTE: See below for more info on individual sensors.

    • Check the fault codes in the owner's manual to identify the sensor or circuit at fault
    • Check the relevant sensor connection
    • Check relevant sensor resistance values
    • Check wiring to the sensor all the way back to the ECU and its earth connection
    • Check fault codes with Dealer KTM Diagnostics Tool or use TuneECU program and laptop.
    NOTE: The most common EFI fault code is 4 long and 1 short which can be misread as 5 flashes, this code indicates the Fuel Pump Controller. There is no such "Controller" as the EFI controls the operation of the pump by controlling its earth connection. With the FI code flashing, the bike failing to start you will find the pump not running. This can be an early indication of total pump failure in which case you can usually kick it back into life to get you home. Alternatively leave it to cool and try again after 20 mins or with the ignition on flick the kill switch on and off, which should make the pump run for a second each time you select run and tap the base of the pump at the same time and it may kick into life. If you can't get it to run time for a pump change or pull it out and give it a turn and back flush with WD40. To see if the EFI is preventing pump operation just check to see if there is continuity to earth when flicking the kill switch on and off with ignition key on.If there is no earth then the EFI is not allowing pump operation for some reason.

    HINTS AND TIPS:
    Sensors and especially the throttle body are reasonably robust so always doubt the wiring first, as a dirt bike you are more likely to have chafed a wire or a connection rattled lose.
    Dealers will most likely change components first as it is quicker but can quite often lead to long waits as a throttle body is put on "back order".
    KTM Dealers have a "Breakout Box" to check looms for damage and integrity so encourage them to borrow one as only certain dealers have them.


    SENSOR INFORMATION

    The ECU Monitors the following for faults so these maybe indicated by the fault codes.

    • System Voltage - EFI systems are sensitive to volts and need a minimum voltage to work. If the volts aint right the whole system will be doing strange things. Check Fault Table H first.
    • Crankshaft Position Sensor - Determines engine speed and Top Dead Centre position. Located in engine LH Side cover, cable comes out just above clutch servo, just a pulse coil sensing rotor.
    • Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor - changes fuel schedule during cold starting. Just below spark plug. Its unproven but may shut the engine down if close to overheat.
    • Sidestand switch - Can be removed and 2.2k ohm resistor put in its place, down by sidestand pivot point. Stops the engine if the stand is down and the bike is put into gear.
    • Ignition Coil - EFI monitors coil resistance to detect faults.
    • Intake Air Temperature Sensor - Located inside the airbox it trims fuel mixture dependent on intake temperature. Can be damaged by oil contamination. Connector wires are quite often damaged during airbox removal. NTC thermistor resistance varies with Temp -20ºC (18.8K) and +40ºC (1.136 K). Mine was about 2K at about +20ºC dropping to 0.2K with a heat gun. Think about rerouting the gearbox vent out of the airbox and running to an external pod filter to keep the airbox cooler.
    • Ambient Air Pressure Sensor - Located under the instrument cluster behind the headlight, the sensing tube must be pointing down otherwise it can get clogged with crap.
    • Rollover Sensor - Like a crash switch, just in behind the rear brake reservoir. Shuts engine down if the bike is laid down. Can stop engine restarting if it sticks, bike will run with it disconnected but don't keep it like that as an EFI bike will continue to run upside down lying on your broken leg if you crash.
    • Gear position sensor - Prevents starting if the engine is in gear as you need the neutral light to allow power to the starter motor unless clutch switch is pulled in. Neutral switch also sets the neutral fuel map which restricts max RPM in neutral, if you have a switch fault it can give random neutral light and loss of power. Can disconnect the connector and bike will still run but with FI light on. Sensor is down by the gear lever, just follow the loom up. Also contains 3rd and 4th/ Gear switches which limit power for emissions control in those gear's changeover and can be disabled by disconnecting the switches or automatically in certain maps.
    • Lambda Sensor - Senses O2 in the exhaust to trim the fuel mixture a little, this is turned off with Akra / EVO1 Performance Mapping loaded. Located in the exhaust just below the radiator. Cold engine uses open loop and it switches to closed loop as soon as the lambda sensors reach their operating temperature, This might have something to do with the issue that few people have reported (the bike stalls after 10 secs. ECU will use open loop operation in warm engine also whenever there is enough engine load (acceleration). The O2 sensor is only a narrow band sensor and therefore hasn't got much authority over fuel flow; it can only make slight adjustments, more for emission control.
    • Fuel Pump Controller - There is no separate controller and in fact the ECU controls the pump operation by providing its earth, to check the pump turn the key on and listen for pump to prime, it runs for a couple of secs. Alternatively leave the key on and flick the kill switch On and Off a few times as the pump will run for a couple of secs each time the kill switch is put to run.
    • Lambda Sensor Heater - Heater in the O2 sensor.
    • Fuel Evaporation Valve - USA Models only
    • Secondary Air Valve - Commonly called SAS, turned off with Performance Mapping loaded or can be manually turned off with TuneECU program. LH Side mounted by the side of the airbox up near the radiator. Can remove SAS completely but need to fit a resistor to remove FI light. Can turn off in TuneECU and remove system without having to fit resistors.
    The following are part of the throttle body and it comes as one unit for a lot of money, KTM engineers answer to fault diagnosis is change the big bit first but they can be on back order for weeks:
    • Throttle Position Sensor (Circuit A) - referred to as THAD in the KTM Manual, it is on the LH Side of throttle body and senses the throttle body butterfly valve position.
    • Accelerator Position Sensor - referred to as APAD in the KTM Manual, RH Side of throttle body and senses the cable input from the throttle.
    • Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor - On top of the throttle body. The engine ECU uses barometric pressure to get ideal air/fuel mixture, thinner air = less fuel. 1013 hPa at sea level and 15 degrees Celsius air temperature is normal pressure. Barometric air pressure will vary from 960 to 1050 hPa. 988 hPa is normal with engine off, when you start the engine and rev it, more suction = less pressure.
    • Motor Drive - this electrical motor drives the throttle body butterfly valve.
    • Motor Drive Hall Sensor
    • Motor Drive Voltage
    These are monitored circuits that you can't do much about:
    • CAN Bus Communication - electronic communication between system components.
    • EPT Motor Drive Relay Permission - Probably internal circuitry in the ECU.
    #4
  5. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table C - Stalling and throttle issues

    (Refer to my KTM690 EFI Idiots Guide chapter on Stalling and throttle issues).
    Click Here

    Carry out the following

    • Throttle sensor check/adjustment (Values change depending on year model)
    • Idle CO check/adjustment

    FURTHER BACKGROUND

    2008-2010 690's have a plastic drive key between the throttle butterfly gear and the TPS that wears out and eventually causes the EFI to go into "limp" mode at idle. Wide open everything seems OK- most of the time. The wear eventually causes stalling and erratic throttle. Partial throttle open, as in most off-road situations, the gear is in the "slip" area due to the worn drive key.
    2011+ throttle body has a metal larger drive key.


    Here are some pictures of the internal gears in the throttle body.

    To get inside, you have to drill out two riveted screws.
    The TPS sensors are plain old regular keihin TPS sensors. These things have been used on almost every throttle body Keihin have produced, and also used on all the old FCR carburettors that have TPS. The gear in the top of the picture shows a black oblong drive key which locates in the sensor housing to drive the sensor, this picture shows the Pre 2010 configuration as the drive key is plastic, later models have a larger brass coloured metal drive key which is more robust and the sensor in turn has a larger drive recess. I don't know of any option to replace the drive key if found to be worn other than purchasing a complete new throttle body from KTM.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #5
  6. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table D - Engine not even turning over when you press the button
    • Check Battery Volts sufficient
    • Check Voltage at starter motor and ground connection integrity
    • Check all fuses
    • Check relay operation : Start Auxiliary Relay and Main Start Relay.(See further background below)
    • Check starter operation with independent power source - Both relays can be bypassed with a single jumper lead from starter motor wire connection (just on top of the starter motor) direct to battery positive, just make sure the bike is not in gear before you do this.
    • Check the resistance of the starter button and the kill switch, not just using a multi-meter with a beep but check the resistance is consistently 0.3 ohm or less. If greater or inconsistent remove the switch block from the handlebar and unscrew both the start switch and kill switch to extract them both from the switch block. The start switch completes the circuit when pushed through the touched contacts but then via the copper spring to a contact pad just to the side of the contact face, just follow the other wire to see what I mean. As the copper spring is coiled make sure the high point/tang is positioned on the contact pad to ensure the best contact. if the end of the tang is just to one side of the contact pad it will hold the spring off from making full contact. Also pull the kill switch apart and clean the contacts as a high resistance is enough to prevent the operation of the start relays.
    FURTHER BACKGROUND

    Power for starting comes via the ignition switch through the kill switch in the run position to the start button. Pressing the start button puts power to the Start Auxiliary Relay. This relay's solenoid has its earth (green wire) controlled by the ECU, this allows the ECU to control the starter by providing an earth path only when it agrees that the engine should start as follows:

    • Engine must be in Neutral (needs the light on not just physically in neutral) or the Clutch Switch pulled in.
    • Engine must not already be running - this logic stops the starter after the engine fires up and is probably signalled by the crankshaft sensor.
    • Sufficient volts to operate the starter AND keep the ECU powered.
    If you think the ECU is preventing starting and you know the engine is not in gear then providing your own earth to the green wire of the Start Auxiliary Relay will allow cranking. Note the ECU may still stop ignition or fuel flow, without a logic diagram for the ECU internals it is difficult to confirm this.

    GENERAL RELAY INFORMATION

    The bank of three relays are as follows left to right across the bike facing forward and are all the same P/N so can be swapped for troubleshooting:

    • Start Auxiliary Relay - Operation and control described above
    • Light Relay - You can use this as the on-board spare if you are riding in daylight
    • Power Control Relay - Provides power to the ignition and the injector, this one must work or you better start walking. The relay is controlled by the ECU supplying its earth. This is thought to be the means used to shut off the engine normally as well as in the following circumstances:
      • when the sidestand sensor indicates the sidestand is down and the gear selector is operated away from neutral,
      • when the rollover sensor operates,
      • there is some thought that an overheat sensed by the cylinder head water temp sensor can shut the engine down to protect it from damage. Thoughts are this can only happen when you return the throttle to idle.
    Behind these relays and to the left is the Main Start Relay this is really two components in one with the charging power supply and 30 amp fuse piggy backing on top of the relay but this supply isn't involved in relay operation.

    Do yourself a favour and put a label on your airbox with relay position information and list your fuses whilst you are at it so you don't have to think about it when the shit hits the fan :D

    [​IMG]
    #6
  7. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table E - EFI - No FI Light

    • Carry out the following test - With the spark plug removed and attached to the plug lead and with its body firmly grounded on the engine casing hit the start button immediately after key on, if you are consistently getting 5 or 6 sparks before they stop then the EFI controller is performing its checks and sensing a condition that's causing it to shut off the ignition.
    • This means a sensor has reached a limit and provided a fuel cut signal to shut the engine down. For safety this only happens at idle so the symptoms are that the engine will not start or it runs roughly and cuts when you return throttle to idle.
    • Check Roll Over Sensor - Disconnect it and it should then run if this was at fault.
    • Check the side stand sensor and if the plastic target is broken off the side stand then tape a magnet onto the sensor to fool it until you can get a spare or fit an "Eliminator" that can be purchased from the dealer or research and fit a resistor to eradicate it.
    • Refer to Fault Table B for more info on sensors.
    #7
  8. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table F - Reluctant starting:
    • Check Battery Volts sufficient and starter turning over at normal speed - if not remove valve cover and check decompressor mechanism and actuating pin.
    • Check valve clearances
    • Fuel Injector Nozzle not shutting off and dribbling fuel on shutdown - Use Mobile Injector Cleaning Service to clean, service and check injector
    #8
  9. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table G - Noises
    • Top End noise is indicative of incorrectly shimmed valves or more commonly Rocker Bearing failure - Remove valve cover and inspect rocker bearings, there are premod and post mod rockers but both types can fail, catch these quick and replace them before they take out the cam as well. Will also cause poor starting and in some cases a sudden engine stop. More info below.
    • Rattle from LH Side is the timing chain if the noise is constant, if the noise is momentary on start up then it can be a lazy Hydraulic Cam Chain Tensioner - replace or fit a Rally Raid Manual tensioner.
    • Rattle from RH Side is normally the clutch - play in the roller bearing behind the clutch or wear in the clutch basket grooves allow the plates to rattle.
    NOTE: If you have a rocker failure then you will need to find all the bits in your engine, for info there are 15 rollers in the bearing and they can find their way down to the drain plugs as well as being attracted to the magnetised rotor.

    [​IMG]

    MORE ON ROCKERS (courtesy of LukasM)

    The problem with the earlier rockers until late 2012 was usually that the bearing seized at some point, presumably from being peened too much. If this happens then you will develop a loud ticking noise that you can usually catch in time, and in the worst case the cam will get damaged from the roller seizing.

    Later they revised the design 2-3 times with a lighter peen, but then the pins started to come out. If that happens the rocker will break off on one side of the pin support, and distribute bearing needles all over your top end, potentially causing a lot more damage. You might sometimes hear a very faint ticking noise from the pin tapping on the valve cover, but in most cases it was a sudden catastrophic failure without any warning.

    The latest design revision was at the end of 2015, and we don't have enough long term data on those yet. The part number has stayed the same since 2013, as has the dimple. The easy way to tell is now the casting number, the old ones had 12 and 13 stamped on them, the latest batch has a 15.

    You cannot be sure which ones you will get when you order but suggest you try and specify casting year number or just refuse them if when delivered they are an old casting number.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    #9
  10. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table H - Electrical:
    • Check Battery Volts - Should be 13.0v if it was fully charged, flick ignition on to simulate electrical load and it should only reduce slightly, big drop means a poor battery.
    • Check Regulator / Rectifier output - Put a multimeter on the battery leads and if you can, start the engine; you should see an increase of voltage to about 13.5 - 15 volts indicating it is charging the battery, (I have a voltmeter fitted and mine runs a consistent 14.6 volts). It should be a steady voltage, if it spikes or there is no increase then the RR is faulty.
    • Check Power Control Relay - Provides power to most of the important stuff, this one must work or you better start walking. The Light Relay next to it is the same P/N and you can use this as the on-board spare if you are riding in daylight.

    NOTE: The RR is designed to shut off and give no output if it sees an open circuit or no load i.e. battery is fully charged. I had a situation where the two red/white power wires from the RR to the battery were showing continuity and also battery volts coming back the other way with a multi meter but if I plugged in a load such as a bulb then there was a high resistance stopping the bulb fully illuminating. This high resistance was enough for the RR to turn itself off. There must have been a broken wire with enough carbon at the break to track minimum current. We put a jumper wire with a 30 amp fuse direct to the battery which fixed it.

    If you cannot start the engine then do the following Static Test:

    • Label the input stator wires on the regulator A,B, and C, the order does not matter.
    • Label the power red wire and the negative green wire on the regulator rectifier D, and E respectively.
    • Set Multimeter to diode test and attach the Red probe of the meter to the red power lead (D) and the black probe of the meter to each of the three stator contacts ( A, B, C) . Should be OL and no beep.
    • Then swap around the meter leads (red and black are swapped) and take the readings again. Should beep and indicate resistance in ohms, resistance at A,B,C should be about the same.
    • Now attach the black probe of the meter to the green negative lead (E) and the red probe of the meter to each of the three contacts ( A, B, C) . Should be OL and no beep.
    • Then swap around the meter leads (red and black are swapped) and take the readings again. Should beep and indicate resistance in ohms, resistance at A,B,C should be about the same.
    NOTE: You can replace the stock voltage regulator with a FH008BA MOSFET based regulator from a 07-11 CBR 600. ($50 off eBay, same as those $150+ MOSFET regs, just have to splice into the existing wiring harness). The OEM thyristor based Regulator Rectifier gets to about 200-350 degrees F (93 - 176 deg C) and will burn you if you touch it, whereas the Shindengen MOSFET Type is just Warm to the touch at approx 100 Degrees F (37 deg C). MOSFET is an acronym for Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor it works on a different principle and therefore can operate cooler. A major advantage of the MOSFET unit is the stability of the charging voltage. Even at tickover with lights on and fan running, you'll still see somewhere between 13.8 and 14 volts. Just above tickover the voltage rises to somewhere in the region 14.3 volts and stays rock steady throughout the rev range, ideal for an EFI bike.

    This shows installation of the FH008 into a 990.

    http://www.ktmforum.co.uk/adventure/...tallation.html


    • Check the stator - (See attached connector pic) If you've got a voltmeter set it to ohms, test resistance between pins 1 & 2 and then between 1 & 3 and then between 2 & 3 each should be no more than 1 ohm at 20deg C, then check each pin to ground for possible short circuit should be open circuit (infinite resistance).

    [​IMG]

    • Should be easy to spot the problems with burned wires and epoxy once you take the cover off

    [​IMG]

    #10
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  11. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table I - Ignition
    • Check spade connectors to the Ignition coil - re-crimp if loose
    • Check plug cap condition
    • Unscrew HT Connection to plug cap and cut off a few millimeters then re-screw into plug cap
    • Try new spark plug - Thermal shock of river crossing can cause the central electrode to crack
    #11
  12. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

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    Fault Table J - Fuel
    • Check audible fuel pump noise when the key is turned on (it only runs for a couple of seconds when key is switched on to prime the pump lines) - check power to pump and that the ECU is providing its earth. The ECU can prevent the pump running by denying its earth connection with certain faults.
    • Check inline fuel pressure - fit a temporary gauge or pressure sensor and check for 50 psi, low pressure could be a failing pump, leaking connection or faulty pressure regulator.
    • Maybe an airlock in the line - try and purge the air out of the line by cracking the injector line.
    • Quite a few peoples breakdowns recently have easily been fixed by cleaning the little top hat filter in the fuel line to the injector. This little filter first appeared in about 2010 introduced by a KTM Tech Bulletin, it was originally fitted in the inlet elbow at the injector but in later bikes, maybe 2014 onwards, it was moved to the quick release coupling at the fuel tank. The fact that they were introduced by Tech Bulletin shows that they were an "after thought" from the original design and I think a waste of time. The injector itself has its own inbuilt gauze filter that can only be cleaned properly by removing the injector and professionally cleaning in an ultrasonic bath and after the pump there is a 10 micron paper filter. These little top hat filters seem to be too small for the fuel flow required at full power and the slightest amount of debris causes them to choke and limit full throttle causing a lean mixture and in some cases shutdown. Either clean it regularly or remove it and throw it in the bin its your choice. A 690 on full noise demands a lot of fuel and I believe this additional filtration is too restrictive. Pictures below of both installations.
    • Clean injector - Use Mobile Injector Cleaning Service to clean, service including: check injector spray pattern, flow rate and leaks/seepage when shut off. If stuck in the bush then reverse flow the injector to clean it as per this video from Noah:

    • Check fuel tank vent lines are clear and unrestricted
    • Access the Fuel Pump in the tank and check for:
      • kinked lines,
      • electrical connections
      • disconnected fuel line
      • blocked inlet screen
      • Check inline filter for blockage
    HINTS AND TIPS:

    Pump can cut out when hot - indicative of failure so change it.
    When checking fuel pressure if you do not have a gauge then pull the pipe of the injector and put your thumb on the end, flick the key on and you can feel if there is enough pressure to push your thumb off the connection, obviously watch out for spraying fuel on you and hot exhausts.

    SUGGESTED MODIFICATION:

    If your fuel pump fails you have two options; stay standard and get KTM to replace pump and filter with KTM bits which I think will be about $300 AUD plus labour or go the harder way and fit the CA Cycleworks Pump with a few modifications required.
    As the standard pump is designed to be removed complete with hoses they are all shrunk fit on and an absolute pain to get off and once you get them off they are cactus, the standard pump change is done at these weird grey disconnect couplings that need a special tool or multiple screwdrivers to undo (Rally Raid sell a special tool - click here for info). The internal filter also has the shrunk fit piping, again near impossible to change without destroying the pipes.
    If you are doing the full mod then you need the following:

    • CA Cycleworks pump available from “Brad the Bike Boy” here in Oz for about $230 AUD. (it comes with a pink hose and two clamps but I don't use them, too flimsy. http://www.bikeboy.org/products.html#fuelpump
    • Gates submersible fuel hose P/N is 27093 , can be ordered through Autobarn Stores here in Australia and is about $40 AUD for one 300mm long piece.
    • Profill filter (teabag type) P/N #HUS03 for the pump inlet. http://www.profill-australia.com/e-store/STORE.html
    • Canam filter P/N 709-000-100 available from Brisbane Jet Skis/ Canam Dealer, Virginia, Brisbane QLD here in Australia or any Canam Dealer.
    • 6 x Triton EFI fuel hose clamps (6-13mm from Autobarn here in Australia).
    • A length of EFI rated fuel hose 8mm
    • A couple of P Clips for mounting the external filter.
    • Spiral wrap - Jaycar here in Australia sell it or any Auto Electrical Store.
    Do all the stuff to lift the tank and pull out the pump and internal filter.
    When you remove the plastic piping cut it such that you leave the moulded section on the pump and the quick disconnect fitting as this gives a bit of extra padding for the new hose to be a good positive fit. Cut out the pipe with a razor blade from the grey quick disconnect to the pump outlet which includes the internal filter, don't disturb the other cooling hose that goes to the plastic housing that the pump sits in, I changed that as well but it is not necessary and more trouble than it's worth.
    Fit the new pump in the plastic housing with the profill filter (teabag type) on the pump inlet and fit the submersible fuel hose to the pump pressure line from the pump to the grey quick disconnect fitting in the tank, this has now removed the internal filter and allows quick disconnect connection at the pump so it is easy to change if you have a pump fail on the trail.
    Use the Triton EFI fuel hose clamps, don’t over tighten the clamps and crush the plastic but not too loose either as it is 50psi pressure.
    Whilst in there make sure the spade connectors to the pump are squeezed to make a real tight fit. Also run some lock wire between the two halves of the plastic pump canister as the release clips have been known to come undone.
    Be really careful when refitting the pump assembly not to kink any hoses , I use a bit of welding rod to tease them upwards as I gently push the pump in. I always ensure that the pump sits flat with no effort so I know the hoses aren't caught up or kinked.
    Fit the 10 micron Canam filter P/N 709-000-100 in the pressurized fuel feed from the tank to the injector so it can easily be accessed on the trail and replaced, also must be away from heat sources, use extra EFI fuel hose to plumb it in. Suggest you fit this where the current quick disconnect is to remove that from the system as they tend to break.
    Also put some spiral wrap around the fuel line in the area of the upper tank bolts as it can chafe badly here. You must use EFI rated clamps on the hose due to the pressure.

    SOME PICS OF THE MODIFICATION:

    This shows the standard configuration when pulled from the tank. You can see the intank Mahle Fuel Filter and the plastic hoses that are a pain to remove.

    [​IMG]

    This is what the internal filter looks like when cut open, full of a black deposit. There is ongoing discussion as to where this comes from, either from the pump brushes or from the black plastic fuel tank resin. Either way it clogs the filter and overheats the pump.

    [​IMG]

    This is Post Modification with the internal filter removed and replaced with a piece of "SUBMERSIBLE" fuel hose secured with EFI rated hose clamps. The original plastic hose is cut off just short of the quick disconnect coupling and the fuel pump outlet barb. I leave the plastic hose on the barbs so the hose goes on nice and tight. Pic also shows the Profil Teabag Filter fitted to pump inlet replacing the original basket type strainer. It will need to be cleaned/replaced about every 10000kms.

    [​IMG]

    I drill two holes either side of the canister spring clip recess to allow me to wire lock the canister halves together as some have had the clips fail and found the pump floating around in the tank.

    [​IMG]

    Remove the hose complete with disconnect coupling from the outlet on front of the tank to the injector. In this case we found a little inline filter that the current owner knew nothing about so it had never been replaced. Now its gone, way too much restriction on flow to have a second filter in the line.

    [​IMG]

    Fit the new EFI rated fuel hose and Canam Filter with EFI rated hose clamps between the tank and the injector. I go up and over forward from the tank, (strap to the frame on the left in the pic) this gives enough slack to rotate the filter out to a spot where you can get to it to change it out in the bush if necessary. The Canam filter should be changed about every 10000km.

    [​IMG]


    TOP HAT FILTER LOCATION:


    Top hat filter pre 2014 installed in the injector inlet elbow:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    2014 Models plus, the filter is in the quick discoonect for the tank

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #12
  13. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Fault Table K - General Wiring
    • Many wiring faults occur in the Battery/Fuse Box area and the terminal connections to the relays in this area.
    • Also remove the battery, battery tray and FuseBox Relay tray then check for chafed wires under the trays and any visible connections.
    • Carry out general inspection of all looms for damage / chafing
    • Check all electrical grounds and clean paint from the surfaces to make a good connection, once connected spray with a wax rust proofer. There are three grounds:
    • Motor/starter motor to frame, braided line
    • Battery to frame. (-) on battery
    • Regulator rectifier to frame. (2x green wires).
    • Check all harnesses for possible chafing, reroute and tywrap as required.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    #13
  14. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Fault Table L - Air
    • Check rubber sleeve has not disconnected between throttle body and airfilter box.
    #14
  15. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Fault Table M - Clutch
    • Clutch lever pulls to the bar and doesn't operate - Slave cylinder seal leaking or lack of fluid.
    • Clutch lever only pulls in a bit and hydraulic locks - Check master reservoir is not overfull.
    #15
  16. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Fault Table N - Low Oil Pressure light illuminates at idle
    • Check oil pressure transmitter wiring/plug.
    • Check oil filters to see if they have gone "wavy", if water leaks into the oil this stops oil passing through the filters and the pressure build up on the filter causes it to deform. If this is found check the water pump seals, rectify, flush and change oil and replace filters.
    • Check oil pressure with an external test gauge, T in the gauge by the transmitter, if necessary change the spring on the oil pressure regulator valve as spring length sets pressure setting, spring length should be at least 27.5mm.
    NOTE: If low oil light is associated with a noisier than normal cam chain it can be a leaking automatic cam chain tensioner, this can leak a significant amount of oil internally therefore dropping oil system pressure. Replace tensioner or install aftermarket manual cam chain tensioner.
    #16
  17. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Reserved for future chapter O
    #17
  18. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    I have posted this up fairly quickly just to get it all in, let me know any corrections or additions. Hope it helps.

    Andy
    #18
    Wayne Jenkins likes this.
  19. Yellow Pig

    Yellow Pig Allergic to asphalt! Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    9,199
    Location:
    SoCal -T.O.
    Very nice. Keep it coming.
    #19
  20. El Ponkin

    El Ponkin Bloodrunner

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,154
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Thanks to LukasM for the pic of the stators - Updated Fault Table H.
    Andy
    #20