KTM 790 ADV Mad Skillz Riders & Wannabes

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by TrailTrauma, Oct 26, 2019.

  1. BruceWayne

    BruceWayne Been here awhile

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    A newbie question for the masses.

    The 790 is my first offroad bike and it took a while to get used to shifting gears while standing. Feeling better now with practice and having adjusted the shift lever but I'm still not 100% comfortable with it. Would larger footpegs actually help with this? I know more seat time is the best answer but offroad skills are progressing well in every other area but this. For reference, I'm in size 11 MX boots.

    If anyone's been in a similar position and made the change, I'd love to hear how it went for you.
    #81
  2. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    If it mostly shifting up thats the issue? And is it mostly 2nd to 3rd? Is it possible to narrow the problem down any?

    I had issues when I started out with offroad. As my boots wore in it became more natural. The 790 now has been one of the more natural shifting bikes I've owned. I still miss the odd 2-->3nd shift, but this 790 was sticky there from the start.

    I did look down one day, to see the inside profile of my shifting boot's toe box getting hung up on the skid plate area. I was overcompensating and turning my boot inwards too far. Instead of clicking up the lever my boot would get caught under the plate and feel like a missed shift. It was, but not for the reasons I had suspected.
    #82
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  3. BruceWayne

    BruceWayne Been here awhile

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    Upshifts cause me more of an issue for me. I shift my foot slightly outward on the peg, then flex down (combination of ankle and knee movement as the boot soles are very stiff), then pivot the toe back inwards under the lever in order to shift it up. I'm wondering whether a wider footpeg would allow my foot to sit a little further out on peg all the time and at least take the first step of this process out of the equation.

    I didn't think of the possibility the boot's getting caught somewhere but that could be happening.

    I don't think the gear I'm heading to makes a big difference and I'd say it's not the gearbox/shifter that's to blame. The shift action is smooth enough and quickshift helps as well.
    #83
  4. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    I thought guys with QS had the opposite problem of the bike shifting because of accidentally hitting the shift lever with their boot while riding.

    I just purchased larger adv footpegs. Going to be nice to have the extra real estate. Having said that I personally wouldn't look to wide footpegs for the purpose of ease of shifting. I would establish my technique first, and where I ride optimally in terms of foot/boot position where it impacts gripping the bike and so on, and then work from there.

    For me, ease came with seat time as you suggested. One alteration I made on the 790, as someone here suggested, was to flip the shift lever tip. Once I flipped it things seemed easier.
    #84
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  5. BruceWayne

    BruceWayne Been here awhile

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    Sorry, I'm not near my bike at the moment so I might be missing something stupid but when you say 'flip the shift lever tip' do you mean the brake lever? I've already done that to the brake and that was huge. My foot couldn't pivot downward far enough to lock the rear until I did this. I wasn't aware there was an option for shifter other than adjusting the whole thing up and down which I've already done.

    I definitely agree that more practice is essential but was just curious if people thought a change to pegs could help the process along.
    #85
  6. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Sorry, my bad .. yes that was meant to be a reference to the brake. It's been a long day. :muutt
    #86
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  7. a.c.e.

    a.c.e. U Mud, Bro?

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    I've changed to R/D pegs after a few weeks of riding, they helped my placement of boots (by accident?).
    Those R/D lower pegs let my feet sit a bit more outside due to a small gap to the spiked area.
    The lever was readjusted with changing the pegs, so the gap did not change, but the position.
    I'm running size 13 MX boots, had some unintentional shifts with stock pegs, way less now.
    #87
  8. ramirin

    ramirin Ready to push

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    Pivot pegs are great help for both shifting and braking. Also boots are different, cheapest models don't have any pivot joint and that makes ankle very stiff.

    Having boots like sidi crossfire or similar and pivot pegs should remove the problem from the beginning - but after few years you can't replicate the problem as you don't even think about it even with shitty boots and standard pegs.
    #88
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  9. BruceWayne

    BruceWayne Been here awhile

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    Thanks everyone for chiming in.
    #89
  10. gearheadE30

    gearheadE30 @LC8Adventures Supporter

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    Many adventure riders/newer dirt riders tend to stand up very straight or even slightly back on the pegs until their comfort level/aggression increases. This flattens the foot out and can make it hard to get under the shifter in stiff dirt boots. As you are getting used to the bike, you may want to adjust the shifter up a bit as you are getting used to it. This may make it harder to upshift when sitting, as you may just have to pick your whole foot up instead of trying to bend your ankle.

    Eventually, you will get used to a less upright and more controllable attack position where your head is forward over the headlight and windshield. It will feel strange for a while as the typical fear is that you are going to wash the front end and not be able to recover in time, but it's actually much easier to respond and takes much less energy to react from this position. Note the legs are angled forward and the toes down a bit - from this position, it becomes much easier to get under the shift lever.

    Of course, it's also possible your shift lever is just adjusted to a lower "street" position and needs to come up a bit. Bottom of the shifter tip in line with the top of the foot peg is a decent starting point.

    Wide pegs can be nice for a few reasons, but I'd suggest getting the technique right on the stock (perfectly adequate) pegs first.

    As a bit of an aside, it is very easy to accidentally "trick" the quickshifter when standing, because it's easy to bump the shifter with your boot. The bike thinks you want to shift but you don't actually...and either you get a surprise accidental shift, a nasty gear grind, or intermittent engine cutting out issues. Great, fun feature on the street, but left me remarkably frustrated off road.

    [​IMG]
    #90
  11. ramirin

    ramirin Ready to push

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    I think that with some thoughtful practise you can make another tool into box of that engine cut without gear change.
    #91
  12. BruceWayne

    BruceWayne Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the feedback @gearheadE30!

    I have already adjusted the shifter, so it's inline with the top of the peg. Like you say, slightly annoying when sitting but I can live with that.

    I'm moving my torso forward like you describe but I think I need to work on the leg position you're talking about. Probably too upright in my lower half. Great tip!
    #92
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  13. Bluetonguejak

    Bluetonguejak Pretend racer

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    Pic from FB
    FB_IMG_1576091115305.jpg
    #93
  14. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Who built that shock reservoir? Any more photos?
    #94
  15. AdvRonski

    AdvRonski They call me......Ronski

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    Looks like an Ohlins reservoir. And different forks, too.
    #95
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  16. truckergemi

    truckergemi Adventurer

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    As someone just getting back into dirt riding, this pic makes me just want to give up, buy a Harley, and start yelling at kids to get off my lawn.
    #96
  17. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second... Super Supporter

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    #97
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  18. Yellow Pig

    Yellow Pig Allergic to asphalt! Supporter

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    #98
  19. AdvRonski

    AdvRonski They call me......Ronski

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    That's not an Airtender, they have a double-barrel can setup with a long adjuster sticking out the back.
    AIRTENDER 7.9.jpg
    #99
  20. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    huh?