KTM 790 Adventure

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by 2whlin, Oct 8, 2017.

  1. windblown101

    windblown101 Long timer Supporter

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    Yep. That's how mine were. I adapted by finishing stops with the rear brake rather than the front. Not a great solution but a workable one since I was on a trip at the time. They are better at the moment after giving the rotors a good cleaning but still not quite right. If I had a dealer close by I'd press the issue but as it is I can't be bothered with two 3 hour long round trips that eat up a good chunk of two days, one to drop it off and another to pick it up just to hear KTM decides it's normal wear.

    On the bright side if I convert to a single caliper up front I'll only have one rotor to mess with.
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  2. hcd

    hcd Adventurer

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    Same here, too far to go to just be told no.
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  3. rsteiger

    rsteiger Bob Supporter

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    See I think we sometimes forget that some one who is looking at a T7 is probably some one who is not going to ride a bike flat out nor cares too.

    They stated somethings in that review that rang true for me when it comes to the 790 - the suspension being too harsh is one of those comment. Now I will say the 790R suspension is wonderful when being ridden hard but I don't ride hard all that often. Could that be adjusted, probably so but I suspect most of these reviewers never touch the clickers to adjust the bike for them much less set the sag.

    There are aspects of the T7 that I like with simplicity being one of those. I tend to ride longer distances and simple must seems to work for me. Just last week my brother had to hook up his trailer to rescue a friend and his 790 that 'just stopped running'. I am sure there is some sort of user error as the root cause but I really don't want to have to carry a manual with me all the time to troubleshoot a bike in the middle of nowhere.

    On the other hand, I have not ridden a T7 yet but have spent a good bit of seat time on the 790. The 790 is an impressive machine for sure but I did not care much for how it handled on the street - it felt ponderous and heavy in the twisties but that feeling leads me to also to think that it's geometry also is the reason why it is so much easier to ride in the sand than bikes I have owned in the past. Likewise if the T7 is more flickable in the twisties then I suspect it will be more of a handful in the sand.

    It all comes down to how comfortable an individual is on the bike. I will probably upgrade my ride this fall and the 790 and T7 are on my short list... But so is the Africa Twin (spent a lot of time on that as well) and given the prices on used AT's that is currently the front runner since I am comfortable on the bike and it does what I need it to do.
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  4. turbofan790

    turbofan790 Been here awhile

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    You are the first person I have seen say any 790 felt ponderous in the twisties.

    Was the front tire flat? :y0!
  5. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    This is where I'm grateful to George (@Torque ) for teaching me how to tweak the bikes geometry. I was having to wrestle the 790 in 'and' out of twisties as it came (with the OEM springs which are far too light for me). In the interim before ordering new springs, I got the sags as close as I could, but the real difference was found after I raised the fork tubes. Unreal difference. Once I got that perfect, the bike easily initiated every turn, 'and' naturally pulled up and out of those tight, quick turns. Suddenly the bike was a hoot to ride! That was a great lesson in how to adjust the bike so that the outcome was stellar. So to @rsteiger I would suggest the same approach; raise the fork tubes in the triple. Find that sweet spot where the bike feels perfectly natural, and easy in the tight twisties. The bike should almost turn in and out of those curves on it's own, with the smallest of rider input. Another change I made was gripping with not only my knees, but my boots. Once I brought the boots into the equation things evolved yet again.

    I think riding is like perfecting your golf game. Every moment in the saddle is an opportunity to tweak some aspect of your mechanics. To push oneself, and in doing so, try and fail at improving until the efforts pay off and a break through is realized. I'm kinda glad I suck at this, in general, in comparison to many who have been at this type of riding for many more decades than I have because I have so many aspects to realize yet. The 790 seems to have become that bike in which I moved from being a passenger in many way, to being the rider (if that makes sense). Going from a fairly passive rider to an assertive one pays off a bounty of dividends.
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  6. Beeners

    Beeners Adventurer

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    600 mile service and break in

    This has probably been covered somewhere before, but I didn’t find it.

    I just clocked over 600 miles on my R. No issues of any kind.

    1) what if anything happens to the bike at the 600 mile mark? I think the tachometer does not flash as much, a cosmetic item. Does anything actually change from a performance perspective?


    2) Does the dealer performed 600 mile service unlock or alter some performance capability of the bike? I realize it is a through inspection.

    Thanks for enlightening me!


    Mike
  7. tshansen

    tshansen Been here awhile

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    Mine was different thickness... so i got new ones...
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  8. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I think a lot of comparison is about our own comfort and skill. I had a Triump Sprint, a fantastic bike, more capable than me. I rode it quickly and had great fun with it. Then, my wife hated it, I traded it for a 2000 Thunderbird, the fun one, not the 800 lb beast. Can't tell you why, but I rode the T-bird faster and with greater confidence.

    So what.
    Well I find the 790 flowing threw the twisted turns with almost no effort or thought. It seems to respond to my slightest movements. I had 60k on my 650GS, but within a month I was riding the 790 faster in the turns.

    Buy and ride what makes you comfortable and bring a smile to your face, and your wifes.
    rsteiger likes this.
  9. markbxr400

    markbxr400 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I was surprised after watching the video with the result. Since they put so much difference between the bike solely on the last criteria after pretty much bunching the bikes together for the other criteria, they could have saved us all a bunch of time and said that the Yamaha is dirt cheap, so no comparison to any other bike.

    I'll still see my 790 as the best value for my money.
    Toddv and ibgary like this.
  10. CalamariKid

    CalamariKid Been here awhile Supporter

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    I appreciate the comments.
    It simply means you can now ride with rpm’s above the break-in restricted 6200. Understand that the restriction was not a physical restriction during break-in, it is just that the tachometer ‘yells’ at you if you breach it.

    Nothing is physically unlocked, other than the tach warning signal is no longer yelling at you.
    Beeners likes this.
  11. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    I don't think you can change the tach flashing RPM until the 600 miles service is complete. Mine came back from its first service with the flashing set to 9000 or 9500 RPM. I changed it down to 8500.
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  12. rsteiger

    rsteiger Bob Supporter

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    Nope..lol

    Rode both a brand new 790S and a rental 790R back to back with my lowly 650 V-Strom. Both felt sluggish in the turns compared to the Strom. More so I was able to open and hold a lead in the real twisty stuff but whenever a straight section came up I was toast.

    I suspect part of that feeling was the 21" front wheel and the tires they were running. Nonetheless sluggish compared to my Strom and WRR when it came to changing direction. Another big part of that could just be my familiarity with the Strom - I have over 80,000 miles on them in all sorts of conditions and I know where their and my limits are on them. Jumping on a new bike if something feels unfamiliar it is likely I will not push it as hard. The two riders I was with were both new to the 790 as well so I suspect they weren't pushing as hard as they could either.
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  13. Rudderfeet

    Rudderfeet Been here awhile

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    I won’t negate your experience, but I sold my 2013 V-Strom 650 for the 790R and wouldn’t go back if you paid me.

    I LOVED my Strom and took it on spirited rides through TN, WV, NC, KY, fire roads, fields and a deeply rutted messes I can’t believe it made it through. It took my girlfriend and me on camping trips and never let us down. It never lacked for power and was super easy to mod.

    And yet, my 790R is more fun to ride in every way. It carves twisties more true and with less dive drama, the MSC package is exceptional, the suspension far better, its power to weight is intoxicating and I’m starting to feel almost as confident on it (for the weight) as my Beta 350 enduro bike.

    The first day I rode the 790R in WV after picking it up in Morgantown, I was hooked. I couldn’t believe how predictable and responsive a 21” wheel could be and how I could soften and stiffen the ride with just the clickers. I ultimately landed on stock compression and rebound settings on the forks and a couple clicks softer on the rear and think it’s pretty close to perfect for my combo of street and fire road / twin track riding.

    Anyway, your mileage may vary but this former V-Strom 650 lover is smitten with his katoom.
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  14. 1coolbanana

    1coolbanana Long timer

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  15. Nelso

    Nelso All the gear-no idea

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    The S is good enough...

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  16. Pete S

    Pete S Been here awhile Supporter

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    I think it will be good enough for what I will be using it for, and a huge upgrade to my Versys 650. The lower seat height was a plus for me. There also was a huge price difference between it and what I would have paid for a 2020 R. I'm getting a 2019 S for $11750 USD plus another $880 for cruise control, quickshifter, heated grips and Rally Pack. No other charges. A 2020 R would possible have been $13699 + $550 freight + assembly fee + $724 for the other add-ons (Rally Pack included). So about a $2500 difference.
  17. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I'll say the 790 has definitely grown on me. On paper it checked all of my boxes, weight under 500 lbs, range over 250, off road ABS, tubeless tires, suspension 7+".
    The 1st few months of riding it were great, both on and off road. Very happy with it.
    Cost od service much lower than with the BMW.
    Earlier this week I had the chance to ride the Old BMW again. I was suprised by how unstable it felt after getting use to the 790. I wouldn't switch back either.
    My only complaint is the front brake issue. With the BMW, I'd had it towed in to the dealer twice in the 1st yr for stalling and refusing to restart.
    Rudderfeet likes this.
  18. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    If the T700 won for being simple and inexpensive, why wasn't the VStrom 650 included? Probably get a 5 yr old for 2 or 3 grand, new winner with the same tech.
    Rudderfeet likes this.
  19. Rudderfeet

    Rudderfeet Been here awhile

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    I’d agree, if the review was even more street oriented. The 5” suspension travel and modest ground clearance on the Strom is one of its biggest limitations.
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  20. alonad

    alonad Been here awhile

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    me and my friend had a discussion about the T7 a couple of months ago and we both agreed that the T7 is really for a different target customer.
    people that are buying the t7 wouldnt buy the 790 because of the price. the riders who would buy the t7 are exactly the vstrom 650 crowed.
    (i am not saying anything bad about them my 2 previous bike were dl1000) that want to go more off road but cant/wont spend 15k (after taxs etc...)
    and the few that just want a simple bike and will modify it to spec.
    i think for the price the T7 is amazing but its not a compression to the 790R (it's much cheaper ,less advanced,less powerful)
    rsteiger likes this.