KTM Setup Thread...

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by neduro, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    A few thoughts:

    1) the new 250/300 (since 04) is fantastic. Less vibes, same great reliablity, snappier power. It's based on the 03 250sx motor...

    2) I don't ride MX much (if at all) on anything... but the 300 is pretty smooth in how it delivers it's power, which may not always be advantageous on the track. The suspension on the EXC is also very soft... which obviously can be easily rectified with springs and valving.

    3) Since getting the 525, I'm even more enamored of the lack of maintenance required by the chainsaws. No oil filters to buy, no valves to adjust- just stay after the air filter and tranny oil, and ride the hell out of it. :thumb
    #21
  2. PackMule

    PackMule love what you do

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    Good stuff, Ned. Thanks. I'm going to "reset" my front end alignment. It's feeling harsh, so that'll be step 1 before I go after the oil level. :beer
    #22
  3. slideways

    slideways España

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    Great source of set-up info on the KTM's. One thing I have found that is great for cleaning 2stk exhaust spooge and even works well on cleaning out power valves is easy-off oven cleaner.

    This thread should receive sticky status.
    #23
  4. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    I just received mine today! Amazingly trick & light. Got it from cyclebuy. I was on about my 3rd wonky OEM rebuild (broken bolts, worn spring, spinning pad) and I just came to the conclusion that it was nickel & diming me to death. So I bit the bullet and bought the pmb.
    #24
  5. Odysseus

    Odysseus Stoic Philosopher

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    Thanks mucho Ned! That front end set up procedure is the Shite! I can't wait to get into the garage and do that to the old 640 Adv.

    Cheers!
    #25
  6. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    Since someone bumped this thread, I went back through, and thought I'd update my thinking on the 300.

    My last go-round, I couldn't get a 300 from the dealer I wanted to work with, so I went to a 250 (2005 250 e/xc). I've really enjoyed it, and it has definitely helped me become a faster rider.

    The 300 is a lazy man's bike- it torques over everything. The 250 has great lug, but to really get with the program, you've gotta shift and clutch a bit more. I've read, and I believe (though I haven't verified) that the 250 makes more HP than the 300, just because it revs further and keeps pulling. For riding at elevation, I wish it had a little more spunk stock... so I put an SX piston and head in it and it's perfect. The motor is fantastic- it makes it easy to save energy, but it will really move if you ask it to.

    The 04 onward motor is definitely an improvement. It's smoother, and the smaller carb makes jetting much easier- I can count the number of times my 01 or 03 300's were jetted perfectly on one hand. The 250 always is, and I never have to mess with it save summer/ high country vs. winter/ utah.

    The 05/06 chassis is also much nicer- for whatever reason, it handles better and is more compliant than my 03 ever was. All those subtle changes add up eventually.

    On my 250, it took about 10 oil changes before it quit dirtying up the tranny oil. Now, with 2 seasons on it, it's as perfect as it's ever been- it shifts perfectly, the chassis remains tight, and I love it.

    One last setup note. I recently switched to Emig 22mm offset triples, and they are an improvement overall. The bike doesn't fight me as much in rocks and rubble- it stays on line easier. However, while there is a clear difference on trails and it's an improvement, there also seems to be a difference on high speed fire road stuff, and I'm not sure the front end is as confident in those situations. At some point, it gets hard to tell what's in the brain, what's in the conditions, and what's the bike setup.

    Which brings me back to the original point... these bikes are great out of the box, and I'd be better off buying gas and tires and just riding it than worrying about these other "improvements". :lol3
    #26
  7. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    Have you ridden an 07' 250 XC-W yet Ned? Unreal, it is going to take a chunk out of the 300 market. It lugs like nothing I have ridden, then just keeps on singing. It makes my 03' a total dog. If you have not ridden one, don't.:lol3
    #27
  8. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    I rode an 06 250 XC that was very much like my bike... is the 07 much different?
    #28
  9. mud

    mud I just wander.....

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    Yeah, it seams to pull lower quite well. I guess they redesigned the cylinder, but I thought it was just for weight, I guess not.:evil It finds traction really well and the suspension is even better. I was rather impressed. Other than that it is the same. :lol3
    #29
  10. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    That's the KTM model- small incremental changes that on the face of it, don't seem like that much, but taken together, seem to make a significantly better product.

    Hmm. Must avoid riding 07. Must avoid riding 07. :D
    #30
  11. Stephen

    Stephen Long timer Supporter

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    Note from a trail n00b: I got to ride boxertwin's box-stock 06 250 xcw in Idaho City. The first day, I was thinking, "this is not really the ideal beginner's bike." It's a little high-strung, firmly sprung, and felt like it was just hopin' I'd let it creep into the powerband so it could spit me off like the dipshit I am. The second day, I was thinking, "This bike rocks. I want one."

    Back here in Texas, I realized there're no riding spots worthy of the xcw, but I still want a dirt bike... and there's this sweet DRZ on craigslist, really cheap... must resist...

    Goddamn dirt bikes, sirens on the shoals they are.
    #31
  12. Hair

    Hair no wants or warrants

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    I changed the fluid in my forks today. I've been putting it off for to long.

    The setup check is what did it for me. When I push on the bars. The forks at first would not move then they stuck.

    After going though the alignment procedure and changing the oil they work like new ones.

    Good job Ned.
    #32
  13. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    Glad to hear it! I replied to your email, but it bounced... :dunno

    If anyone else is wondering, 5 weight should do fine...
    #33
  14. Hair

    Hair no wants or warrants

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    I changed my email address on the site. Something got messed up.

    I really can't express what a difference working on the forkes made.

    I had been frustrated with their proformance for a long time. I have not ridden trails with them yet. But on the street out by the house they are smooth as silk. :thumb
    #34
  15. techieguy

    techieguy Lost in the woods

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    How difficult is it to replace the oil? Earlier in the thread there was talk of a write up; did I miss it?

    Thanks,

    Techieguy
    #35
  16. Wanderer7

    Wanderer7 long time rider

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    I've been searching around as usual and I came across this thread. Now, before someone points out that it's almost 9 years old, I just want to say that the info is still relevant. So if anyone can help clarify something that I have wondered for a quite some time now, it's this:
    Logic deems that by loosening the front fork triples that if it's still holding itself up at that point, that if you push down on the front end, that the whole front end will drop and not necessarily "settle" into place like the OP has stated. What's to keep it from falling? I've always wondered this when I read about getting rid of front end stiction using this method, yet I never heard anyone ask. Can someone please clarify for me? And what of this 15 minute oil change as well? (I'm not as interested in this as I am the first question though)
    Thanks!!
    #36
  17. dhally

    dhally Hammerhead Supporter

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    I always loosen the axle clamps, not the fork triples. Just to make sure the axle is squarely clamped into the fork lowers.
    #37
  18. Rusty Rocket

    Rusty Rocket Life behind "Bars"

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    the original post calls for loosening the top triple from the post that goes through the steering head. That parallels the forks with each other. I did it and it helped a lot.
    #38
  19. neduro

    neduro Addict

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    So, my writeup isn't super clear on the point, but my approach these days is to loosen all but the top clamping bolt in the triples. On most KTM forks, that means there are 2 top triple bolts, and 2 bottom triple bolts per fork leg, and I loosen 3 of these (both bottom and lower top). Jeesh, that's a mouthful.

    I would add to this that I now use a torque wrench on the lower triple clamp bolts. Machined triples will have a torque value (typically 12 n/m lower and 17 n/m upper), cast should be similar. I do not find the upper is nearly as critical for fork feel as lower torque setting, and be very careful to sneak up on it, turning one bolt then the other small bits at a time until they both break over the torque setting.
    #39
  20. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    There was a recent prolonged discussion on installing or adjusting fork installations to true up the legs. I think we made good progress, and the dead horse coughed up a few more gems as we beat it to a pulp. Here is my summary post in my fork maintenance thread that links to pages in the LC4 index thread where the discussion was held:

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=339544&page=6

    The one point I'll make here is I haven't noticed anyone loosening some of the triple clamps pinch bolts during their process. If the clamps are machined correctly they should hold the upper portion of the forks true. You can check the true-ness of the upper fork section and then rotate them in the triples to improve this if their is damage or mfg. flaws. More in the link above and links therein.

    My other thought is just two-cents: the upper and lower pinch bolts have torque values and I think these are likely very important for protecting the forks from damage. Tight enough so they won't slip under normal forces, but in a crash or such they can slip - rather than bend or break.
    #40