Kymco K-Pipe

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by AMAC1680, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Anybody know what the load limit is? They never seem to give that in the specs. The bike weighs 25 pounds less than I do. I noticed it has a 31" seat, only 1" lower than my XT, so maybe I wouldn't be able to get on it anyway.
    #21
  2. driller

    driller Twist and Go

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    YJ and I stopped for a look at one today. Kinda neat looking . The frame was interesting. Even a petcock to the carb. It looks ripe for some custom work. We were thinking the engine is the same pattern as the Grom and Kawi. It would make a good campground bike that would be easy to put on a hitch hauler behind a truck or rv. I would like to see one done up in a post apocalyptic theme. Matte green, knobbies, skid plate, tail rack similar to a trail 90.
    Gee, if these or the Mad Ass were around when I was 14.
    #22
  3. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    It's a really cool bike, but I can't quite figure out what it's purpose is. It seems to be a bit small for me. If I didn't already have the XT, I could get a new leftover Suzuki DR200 for about $1000 more. Yes, that's a lot more money, but it's a lot more bike. Freeway legal and will easily cruise at 60 mph, plus it has a strong frame and off road capable suspension. It should be fine for running around town, but a CVT scooter would be easier to ride in stop and go. Not saying it wouldn't be a blast to ride, but it would be hard for me to justify the price, even as low as it is. It should be a great beginner bike, but again, for about $1K more you can get a really nice Ninja 250.
    #23
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  4. Dabears

    Dabears Long Timer

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    #24
  5. AMAC1680

    AMAC1680 Outdoorsman, advocate, paraplegic

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    One of my early bikes a Kawi G5100 was 1 down 4 up. That was 1972 and I think they went to 5 up a few years later.

    If that pattern is the cause of a recall all the SYM Wolfs will need to be recalled as they are also 1 down the rest up.

    AMAC
    #25
  6. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    All bikes are one down and the rest up, with neutral between first and second. Well at least that is the standard. Many bikes used to have the shifter on the right side, especially British bikes and older Sportsters. I did have one Chinese bike that had a "rotary" shifter. There was no stop at the bottom or the top. it went 1-2-3-4-N-1-2-3-4-N shifting up, and the reverse going down. Finding neutral was a real PITA when you wanted to, but easy to do accidentally, if you shifted one up past 4th. This was a Jialing copy of a Honda Cub.
    #26
  7. Dabears

    Dabears Long Timer

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    Might be the standard, but as I said my 73 Kawasaki was N-1-2-3-4-5. Doubt it is the only example. As you noted early British bikes (BSA, Triumph, Norton) and Sportsters were right side shifting which made swapping back and forth quite interesting.
    #27
  8. Caesars_ghost

    Caesars_ghost Air Cooled.

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    When you shop used bikes, almost every new bike looks like a bad deal. A good Ninja 250 can be had all day long for $1500.

    The purpose is 125cc around-town commuting and fun, for people who want new, want cheap and reliable, and don't want a scooter or something that looks like a dirt bike. I don't think Kymco had any secret or profound ideas about a niche for this bike other than that.
    #28
  9. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    From the Pipe's spec's, it's about 8 hp, which seems down on power considering the old Honda vertical cylinder OHC bikes were about 11 hp. Also not impressed with the weight or that it only has 4 speeds.

    240# wet is too heavy. I know the Honda CL90 was about 190#, my old SL90 was 205#, this bike is close to the Honda CB/CL-125's in weight without the extra gear, or power. It could also use a 2 gallon fuel tank, 1.2 gallons is also, way too little gasoline.

    I run a clone 125 cc in a Honda Cub C102, and I'm always finding I'd like a fifth gear for stretching it's legs a little. The torque is there, just not wide enough jumps in the gears to take advantage of it's power.
    #29
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  10. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    I've caught up to the discussion on this thread and I will add my 2 cents.

    The K-Pipe doesn't come with a clutch on the Euro model (as seen on the pic below). I saw one last year in France and it didn't have the clutch lever on the left side that I saw on the US model. My dealer told me that it shifts like a Symba/ Super Cub (which you can tell by looking at the gear shift = 2 pedals) and that the clutch is redundant. You will not stall if you stop in 4 gear and do not pull the clutch in. You do have to go back from 4 to 1 to neutral. It's a rotary semi-automatic clutch.

    Now why Kymco added the clutch for the US market, I'm not sure. Yes, there's talks of a recall because our dear US government would like the gears to be reversed. My understanding is that the 1-4 (or more) down is a race shifting pattern. Would it be the reason why Kymco would be forced into a recall and have to reverse the shifting - 1to4 up? I'm not sure but that might be the case.

    [​IMG]
    #30
  11. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    My nearest Kymco dealer never ended up getting these in so I have yet to see one up close. I wonder if the recall has anything to do with it?

    I am very curious how they plan to fix it? I looks to me like they would have to swap out the entire engine!
    #31
  12. dkazzed

    dkazzed Been here awhile

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    Until the head gasket goes!

    The Honda Grom and Kawasaki Z125 Pro, the K-Pipe's competitor, both weigh about 225# wet. The Z125 Pro has just under 2 US gallons of fuel capacity, while the Grom is at a measly 1.5. Good thing Grom owners are averaging 105 mpg according to Fuelly.
    #32
  13. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Around here you can get a thrashedand crashed Ninja 250 for $1500, a really nice one will cost twice that, especially the '08 and up models. I prefer the first generation since they are a lot more comfortable. Way back in 2006 I paid $2700 plus fees for a new Kawasaki Eliminator 125. It was a semi cruiser, and very comfortable. It would cruise at 60 mph all day and hit 65+ (indicated) It weighed 100 pounds more than the K-Pipe. I sort of regret selling it, but it had tube type tires, and the rear was almost the size of a car tire. No centerstand. I doubt I would have been able to fix a flat on it on the road. Having tubeless tires gives the K-Pipe a big advantage. I like it's looks better than the Grom, but wonder how the quality would be on a $2000 bike. I also doubt it would be a good choice for a 6' 260 pound rider, even to ride around locally. But it looks like it would be a much better fit for me than a Symba, maybe even a TU250. I noticed Kymco wisely used a one piece seat. It will be interesting to see somebody actually get one, and find out more about it.
    #33
  14. Dan V.

    Dan V. Been here awhile

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    #34
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  15. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Sounds like a nice bike. I'm not planning on buying one, I'm too big for it, and I'm in the process of selling off some of the bikes I already have. I'm glad they are fixing that weird shift pattern, I wish they would also do away with the heel and toe shifter. If they don't, I hope it can be converted to a "normal" shifter. Kymco must have known what the standard shift pattern is in the U.S. Maybe it was designed for other markets, and they decided to sell it here without "Americanizing" it. After 40+ years of riding bikes with the one down, the rest up, with neutral between first and second, that would have been a deal breaker for me.
    #35
  16. bikeridermark

    bikeridermark Long timer Supporter

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    :DAny heel-toe shifter can be converted to normal................ CUT OFF THE BACK!
    #36
  17. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I have seen heel-toe shifters that you couldn't get your toe under. I think heel-toe shifters are clunky and awkward. My first Goldwing had one. I thought it was stock and I was stuck with it. As soon as I found out it was aftermarket, I ordered a stock standard shifter from eBay. It was night and day. Suddenly the bike felt 300 pounds lighter, handled better, and could be shifted a lot faster, usually without the clunk it made when using the heel-toe shifter.

    I wish Kymco would bring the Venox 250 back
    #37
  18. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

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    They should make a 250cc version for $2499.
    #38
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  19. thederrick106

    thederrick106 gone-fishin

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    I have about 80 miles on my new 2017 Kymco K-pipe.

    I am still taking it easy on it for the break in period but here are my initial impressions:

    I really like the looks and design of it.

    I like that its super simplistic.

    Engine and transmission design are direct decedent of the Super Cub which is an ages of old tried and true design.

    Love having the optional clutch on stops, I would not consider it optional when shifting between gears in motion. Shifts much smoother when using the clutch.

    Seat is pretty narrow for my fat ass. (200#)

    Riding position is a bit cramped even for me at 5'7". I don't think it would be comfortable for anyone much taller. I had to rotate/ tilt the bars forward a bit to give myself some more room. I might look into getting a higher rise motocross style handlebars over the winter. Keep in mind my last bike was a KLR650 so there is a decent difference on my size comparison, and what I am used to.

    Has a backup kick starter, don't see that much these days!

    Runs pretty smooth, though I was advised it smooth's out more through the break in period.

    Its defiantly a 125 four stroke. Not much HP to spare but it is a blast to ride in the twistys.

    It cruises comfortably at 40~50 mph up and down moderate hills. Don't plan on doing over 40mph on those steep double lane uphill climbs.

    You can crank it to cruise at 55 but its much happier at 50mph. I got a top speed of 62 our of her down hill, and was still trying to be nice on the throttle.

    Won't be winning any drag races but its a fun play bike. Really enjoyable for an hour ride, or to and from work on side roads. Not sure it would be super comfortable for an all day tour but I am sure I will do it on occasion.

    I rate the fit and finish very high on this. I think its a fine bike for $2K.

    I am pretty frugal, and don't like being wasteful but this bike begs to have a set of dual sport knobby tires put on it. Maybe once I put a few miles on the OEM tires I can look at an upgrade. That with some high rise motocross style bars will really change how it feels.

    I know it has passenger pegs but I don't think its very conducive to two up riding, unless its around the block or to the store just for fun.

    It doesn't feel like a mini bike or mini motorcycle (think grom etc.) It feels like a small motorcycle or possibly a moped on steroids, but not a mini bike.

    It doesn't look like I am riding a mini-bike. Even with my 5'7" 200# frame on it I look like I fit what I am riding, if that makes sense.

    I recently sold my old 2003 KLR650 and decided to pickup a new K-pipe. My interests have been moving towards smaller bikes for the past year and am really happy with my new K-pipe. It will be the perfect nice weather commuter and play bike. I have had 650cc, 1000cc bikes and have no interest in those anymore. I don't really care to go over the speed limit anymore.

    A few pictures I took on my first couple outings:

    [​IMG]

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    Any questions or specific picture request? -Feel free!
    #39
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  20. Smaug1

    Smaug1 '19 Kawasaki Versys 1000, '15 SMax

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    I think it would be perfect with a set of "adventure tires" you know, like the V-Stroms come with. Bigger blocks than you would think of for knobbies. The ran the exhaust high enough that it would be a great bike for dirt or gravel roads. When you're riding on those kinds of roads, let out 15 psi or so, and they work really well.

    I'm a former KLR650 owner too. I really liked the legroom it had, as well as the plush suspension. I live in the more urban suburbs now, so I would have preferred tubeless tires, but that long travel suspension and big wheels were just great for soaking up potholes, eh?

    I know what you mean about giving up the big bikes. I miss my big bikes sometimes when I get the urge to tour, but that is not very often, with daddy duties. I also find I'm not tempted to do stupid things on little bikes.

    You are going to have QUITE the garage-full of little bikes, aren't you? 2 Rucki, 2 Super 8s and a K-Pipe... Only thing is to keep in mind the cost of insuring and licensing that fleet. It really adds up.

    If I lived in your area (I don't remember what ADK means) I'd be asking for a test ride and tempted to get one myself.
    #40
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