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let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. mmccarthy7220

    mmccarthy7220 n00b

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    IMG_0204.JPG IMG_E0241.JPG IMG_E0239.JPG Went for an overnighter to try out my new Kriega dry saddlebag setup. they work great. Still trying to find the best spot on the DRZ to attach the front straps.
    Kawasakirob and MYUMPH like this.
  2. Chrismcp12

    Chrismcp12 Been here awhile

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    Here's what I'm thinking for a 9 day jaunt through the Catskills, Adirondacks, VT, NH and the Maine coast. May head into New Brunswick to say I did it.
    IMG_0152.jpg

    Orange duffel... mini-folding table, (civilized happy hour) tent and folding chair. Enough space that I'd the tent is damp or wet I can put it in there loosely.
    Lg packing cubes... 2 are clothing, 1 is coffee kit. Smaller one is persona hygiene crap.
    Red cube is electronics, lights, cables
    Sleeping bag and Matt.
    Inflatable pillow.
    Black box is kitchen kit. Stove, cup, spoon, etc.
    and an inflatable pillow.

    On the fence with a ENO hammock and straps.
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  3. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Tools?
  4. Chrismcp12

    Chrismcp12 Been here awhile

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    Already on board.
    This is the stuff I add.
  5. ClutchDumpinDan

    ClutchDumpinDan Go do

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    @maloryII What's in the compression sack? What's your tent and sleeping bag setup? Thanks!
  6. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Sleeping bag in the compression sack, which is the only thing I can't fit in the bags. I don't use a tent -- I use a bivvy sack. There are certainly pros and cons -- the most obvious advantage being the weight and space savings over a tent. (I really like Sea to Summit compression bags, btw. Really thin and light despite being 100% waterproof.)

    My next step in slimming down even further is to ditch the sleeping bag -- why am I running around the east coast in the summer with a 20 degree down Marmot sleeping bag? It's nonsense. I'm gonna try a down quilt, which backpackers have used for years to save space/weight. The nice ones can pack down into the size of a melon.

    Sleeping setup below. The 550 cord just keeps the bivvy sack's hoop erect during the night. I'm still learning how to use a bivvy effectively -- they need to be staked out to maximize the internal space. Perfectly comfortable in anything but heavy rain, in which case you'd need to rig a fly. I learned that the hard way. (PS the photo is deceiving, the bike would fall well short of my head if it tipped over.)

    [​IMG]
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  7. Davidprej

    Davidprej Davidprej Supporter

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    I was wondering about that! Would turning the bike around be even better? Less chance of tip over?
  8. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Yeah, probably so
  9. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    If you're not already, use shock cord. Very unlikely you'll pull anything over as it stretches.
  10. baveras

    baveras Been here awhile

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    Nice and lightweight setup!
    Here is a suggestion in the hunt for the perfect sleepingbag. Since you're using a bivvy bag a sleeping bag without a zipper might be interresting and at sub 500 grams it's definetley lightweight.
    https://www.haglofs.com/gb/en-gb/l.i.m-down-+1/p/416040-2C5.html?
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  11. BigEasy

    BigEasy Fish Eyed Heathen

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    I'm not so sure about a no zipper sleeping bag. I get the weight minimization thing but I like a zipper for some ventilation. That could very well be a moot point in a bivy bag though, IDK?
  12. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Interesting -- a concern I have is that it may be difficult to control temperature. Either you're in the bag or you're out and it's possible that neither is comfortable at a given time. With a down quilt you could at least open it up. The bivvy itself holds heat very well as you could imagine. But you're right -- 473g is about as light as I've seen in a down bag and it's even lighter than the quilt.

    I wish we had more access to Haglofs in the US -- they make excellent stuff, it's strange they aren't in the US market more.
  13. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah, that along with the pain in the ass it is to get in an out of a bivy, I'm not sure how it would work. Bivy's are great for an ultra-minimalist approach, but they come with a lot of compromises, so my hat's off to anyone who uses one on a regular basis.
  14. milzispete

    milzispete is it supposed to look like that?

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    Love the set up but if your bike gets stolen you will be dragged for miles :)
  15. 919nick

    919nick Been here awhile

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    Being on the east coast, do you have condensation issues?
  16. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Haven't had condensation issues like you might get in a tent even when it's dry outside -- but if it rains heavily and you don't rig up a fly, you'll get damp where the bivy layer is in direct contact with your sleeping bag. In a drizzle or mist it's fine.
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  17. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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  18. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    I have not -- although I would wager that while it would provide some marginal improvement to the waterproof membrane, it wouldn't dramatically improve a bivy sack's ability to hold up to heavy rain (which is the only time the bivy doesn't work well.) Might be worth trying though, assuming it wouldn't degrade the GoreTex's ability to breath.
  19. BikerBobber

    BikerBobber Trying to get lost

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    Not really. I can ground set my hammock. No trees required. Roomier than a bivy.
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  20. BikerBobber

    BikerBobber Trying to get lost

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    Just bring the front tube and a patch kit. Front will work in the rear for anything you can't patch.
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