let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. Dread

    Dread Putt-Putt Adventurer

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    + 1 to this. Very well packed. I am not a big fan of compressing everything either. Makes getting up and going so much harder. I can get all of my gear for a long trip in 70-75 liters compressed and tight, but I just prefer 90-95 liters of space for traveling. I stopped fighting it. How you pack is as important, if not more so.
    dobby and TOC like this.
  2. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    I compress my tent and sleeping bag but I have to say the new style of oblong compression bags work very nicely.
    Bigger Al and Mr Head like this.
  3. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Nicely done and looks good. But having the same bike and luggage, going solo I'd only need the three cases and the top case would be near empty and that's with carrying an axe, chair, fishing gear and both a tent and hammock.

    2up, I fill the three cases and a Redverz tent would be strapped to one pannier.

    Also, a note on the bags strapped to the panniers. Riding in wet weather and any movement in those bags will have the paint worn off the lids in a couple days.

  4. NorthIdaho800gsa

    NorthIdaho800gsa Bad influence

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    Meh, just paint....you'll live.
  5. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    Agreed, but the paint is thin and others may care.

  6. RJAMT

    RJAMT Who remembered the winch? Supporter

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    Whether or not it's too much stuff depends on whether or not you actually used it. It looks like a lot but when I winter camp my load can get pretty big what with winter clothing, colder rated bag, bulkier shelter, etc.
  7. NorthIdaho800gsa

    NorthIdaho800gsa Bad influence

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    I guess. I buy things to use, not look at. I have seen folks put down a rubber film. Seems to work good. Protects the top of the pannier and provides a non-skid surface. Im giving serious thought to rhino lining the whole thing. Im on the fence though.
    Ladybug likes this.
  8. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie Supporter

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    I travel pretty light these days, but when I was traveling for work on the motorcycle, I had to carry my usual camping gear and work gear plus a big, fat, overweight notebook computer that had a 17" screen and weighed in at about 35 pounds. It just fit in the Jesse.

    [​IMG]

    That is enough junk for a the five weeks I was gone.

    Last year I did four weeks to so, mostly camping. So, a bit heavier than usual,

    [​IMG]

    The dry bags on top of the Zegas are clothes and layers. Tailbag is kitchen and flat fixing stuff. Tankbag has glasses, hearing aids, charge cords, camera and junk like sunscreen and glasses with bifocals.

    The last trip was hotels and a condo so, very light travel. And I knew I'd be riding without the Zegas so, the mailbag carried the usual flat fixing stuff.
    The packed gear looked like the above except nothing strapped to the Zegas. The mailbag was much less full, without the camp kitchen. Both Zegas were not stuffed full.
    Which was good because I bought a new tent.
    The new tent is only slightly larger than the old footprint and poles.

    [​IMG]

    The old tent:

    [​IMG]

    The small bag is tent stakes, they go with the new tent as does the hammer. I need to order a footprint too, but since I don't have anything planned for camping for a while, I can wait.
    That old tent took up most of one of the Zegas, with a little room for hiking boots and a few bits. Floppy hat or something.

    I've also decided to move my flat fixings back to the bottom of the Zegas. I prefer that weight lower. The tail bag could almost be gone, except for those times when I'm going to be riding without the Zegas on, then I need a place for tubes, pump, patch kit, levers and such.
    I'll work on converting to tubeless this winter. That adds tubeless repair kit to the fixings and the rest stay. I could dump the rear tube, but I prefer to have it. Just in case.

    I still like the old tent for winter camping as it is a three season with two vestibules. Roomy and warm. The new tent is all screen so warm weather camping.
  9. Meritlane

    Meritlane Been here awhile

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    This was my setup for a week trip last week. Although it's pretty much the same all the time. I can handle a temperature range from about 30-90 degrees. I have some redundancy in the fact that I prefer a hammock but on most trips there are times I need the tent and sleeping pad. On this trip I was in the hammock every night but on a monthlong trip over the summer there were a couple of times where there were no trees, or (as was the case in Dinosaur NP) they did not let you tie anything to the trees.
    So basically the Ortlieb duffels are camp/sleeping gear. One bag favors the tent set up ie tent, pad, bag, hammer, chair while the other has hammock, underquilt, gear sling, straps, tarp, saw, machete and table. Small Panier has things i wear while the larger one has food, tools, cooking, lighting, ipad, 1st aid, towel etc. I use a lot of packing cubes to keep it all organized. My water is in a bladder inside the tank bag and an ever increasing or decreasing amount is in the dram bag on top of the Pannier. I also carry a 2 gallon gas bladder (usually empty) that lives under the duffles.
    P1020461.jpeg P1020494.jpeg IMG_0233.jpeg
  10. ghedunk

    ghedunk Been here awhile

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  11. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    I very much like that king size bive bag, while I no longer camp or at least very much try to avoid it, my bivi is good but tight, that one is very well sized enough to get all your crap in, very nice setup my friend, who manufacturers that one ?
  12. ghedunk

    ghedunk Been here awhile

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    Uber Bivy by miles gear . Hand made when ordered . He make one bigger than this one .
  13. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    Really nice my next move is to go check, thank you.
  14. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    That is impressive and I think I could easily manufacture aluminum or stainless (probably stainless that way after the basic manufacture I could bend then to the pole curvature, remove 1mm diameter on the cut to length poles at the ends to accommodate the 0.5mm wall manufactured joints, and fix one joint to each pole length as required so no snags or lost joints, would be sufficient so as to make the poles slot together in lengths that fit into the bag to keep it all together in the same bag. No point in having a great big engineering shop at my disposal if I cannot get a bit of homework done now and then, Its official one is on my shopping list thank you again. I have a plan.
  15. jrogers110

    jrogers110 Adventurer

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    Yes! I have the Uber Bivy (for me) and the Pico Bivy (for the wife). Waterproof and no condensation (the biggest problem with bivys). I only use one pole with my Uber Bivy, so the weight is 23 oz. The Pico is 18 oz. Paired with a small tarp, this is a great setup for all weather.

    Also, it's a bit warm, but that's actually a good thing. I find that for any temperature above 65 degrees, no other sleeping bag or quilt is needed. I'd say it adds at least 10 degrees to any sleeping bag/quilt, so I believe the overall weight/space savings of using this bivy is outstanding. It's basically a combination shelter and sleep system, so the multi-use nature of it means savings in both weight and bulk.

    I do not understand why this bivy has not taken over the market for lightweight, low-bulk shelters.

    So far, I've not had that much opportunity to use mine, so I can't personally confirm the qualities of this bivy. But, there are plenty of positive reviews on the interwebs of people who have used their Uber Bivy under difficult conditions, and I've yet to see a negative report (if you know of any, please post the link-- I'd like to read about it).

    The wife and I have big plans for next summer to put these bivy's to the test-- I'll report back when I've done that.

    Good to see someone else out there who's using one!
  16. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    That's cool. Is that thing made out of tyvek, or is the tyvek just a groundsheet. I assume you carry a tarp for rain avoidance?

  17. jrogers110

    jrogers110 Adventurer

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    The bottom is Tyvek, so you don't really need to use a ground cloth (although Miles Gear does provide a second sheet of Tyvek to use as a ground cloth if you so desire).

    The top is made of Kappler ProVent 10,000, a polypropylene microporous material that's similar to Frogg Toggs material.

    While the bivy is totally waterproof on it's own, I do couple it with a tarp for the following reasons:

    --If it's raining hard, I don't want to remove my raingear and get into the bag while out in the open. The tarp allows for some shelter so you can get in/out of the bag in rainy conditions and not get a bunch of water inside. In the middle of a rainy night, it's nice to have that shelter when you need to get up and pee.

    --The tarp provides rain shelter when up and about during the day. The bivy can provide protection as you sleep, but if your trying to, say, make and eat your lunch in the rain, a bivy isn't of much help.

    I have a 5x5 MLD dog tarp (apparently no longer made) that's perfect. Silnylon and 6.5 ounces, it gives 25 sq ft of rain protection for the head of the bivy when I sleep and for any daytime activities such as cooking/eating.

    As I said, I consider this bivy to be about 50/50 shelter/sleeping bag, and I also consider the bivy to include the ground cloth since it has a Tyvek bottom. So my shelter, sleeping bag, bug net, and ground cloth weigh:

    23 oz Uber Bivy w/one pole (ground cloth, sleeping bag, and bug net)
    6.5 oz Dog Tarp (I have a 7x7 tarp when the wife comes along)
    ----------------
    29.5 oz

    If I really want to go light, I use the Pico Bivy. It's a little tighter for me (i'm 6'1, 220 lbs), but doable (if you don't thrash too much in your sleep):

    18 oz Pico Bivy (ground cloth, sleeping bag, and bug net)
    6.5 oz Dog Tarp
    ----------------
    24.5 oz

    About the lightest equivalent system I could come up with would be:

    5 oz ZPacks Pocket Tarp with Doors
    2.5 oz Pocket tarp pole (I just use trees and sticks for a regular tarp, but the pocket tarp requires a specific length and supports/touches the bottom of the tarp-- I think I would not take a chance and just get the pole for it)
    1.6 oz Polycryo ground cloth
    2.9 oz Sea to Summit Nano bug net
    9 oz Weather Shield polypore sleeping bag cover
    -----------------
    21 oz, 18.5 oz if you skip the pole.

    So, the Miles Gear Bivys (in conjunction with a tarp) are ultralight, and totally bomber. The shaped tarps are strong, but, in strong enough winds are at risk. With the bivy, you're not required to use the tarp at all for sleeping, so there is no risk with any wind that's not strong enough to lift you away.

    Flat tarps can also be pitched high, low, or at any angle, so there's more versatility to cope with weather conditions.

    Finally, the tarp gives 25 sq ft of sheltered space, and can be pitched high enough to stand under or low enough to weather nearly any storm, while the shaped tarps provide approximately 30 sq ft that can only be sat in (and then only in the center).

    I've no connection to Miles Gear, but I think their bivy is a bit of a game-changer. They're not too expensive at $200-- about the same as other bivys. However, those other bivy's are not water proof (just splash resistant) and are famous for loads of condensation. I'm talking enough condensation to completely wet out a sleeping bag and creating a risk of exposure.

    I hope others will try it and report their experiences. I as said, I've not all that much experience myself, but I've done a fair bit of study and these things seem to be very promising.

    I hope to have some results myself next summer!

    Some videos:

    Here's Miles setting up the Uber:



    Here's a water test:

  18. thumpism

    thumpism Between bikes

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    My wife purely hates to hear me say those words.
  19. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    Funny, so does my wife, must be a female thing, they all seem to lack faith in us men. I find it better to keep them to myself. What the wife does not know about the wife cannot bitch about.
    MYUMPH likes this.
  20. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    What scares my wife is when I say "I've been thinking...." :lol2