let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    Yes, the chair (I've got the same REI Air chair) is a game changer! Even with an expensive ultralight pack and tent, I'm bringing the (lightweight) chairs. It makes sitting around the campfire a lot nicer than sitting on the ground or even on my sleeping pad.
    NorthIdaho800gsa likes this.
  2. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    Alas, that is not always true. At least not when "better" is measured by "more expensive". :bluduh
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  3. Mr Head

    Mr Head Adventure Hippie Supporter

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    I've used a Jesse bag or lately a Zega Pro to sit on. Fine when it's warm out, but sitting on ice-cold aluminum? :vardy
    The butterfly chairs I have, I bought at REI, but used bonus money I got from work. They would give us bonus bucks vouchers that sometimes we could convert to useful $ for real stores, not just overpriced company logo junk. I managed to twice convert to REI cards. Now, I see the chairs with the forward foot/leg/loop are no longer made. So, you balance on the ball connector. Still light and simple. Folded and stuffed in their bags they are only slightly larger than:

    [​IMG]
  4. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Kinda funny. As I've gotten older, I want lighter, smaller to pack, and easier to handle. I'm done with overweight bikes, and tons of "comfy" gear that make it a struggle to ride. I want to enjoy the RIDING. I've also progressed on the types of gear I camp with. I've found plenty of light weight, easily pack-able options that are very comfy. I ditched a sleeping bag for a top quilt. Got a very light and small packing insulated pad. When I do use a tent it's a simple 2 man backpacking setup. Usually I go with a hammock instead of the tent. I do carry a Helinox chair. I keep the cooking stuff to a minimum. And clothing, thanks to the use of smart wool and some super synthetics, hardly takes up any space or weight.

    Over the years I've downsized bikes. I started years ago, on a pig heavy GS, these days, I have a CB 500X. While I'm not too happy with the Honda, so I am looking at even smaller/lighter with the new KTM 390 Adventure.
  5. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    Experience has told me, small and light equals great expense, if it is to last. I guess, it all comes down to personal preference and the willingness to drop wads of cash on probably replacing existing and useable gear ? No right, no wrong, me I now feel camping it no longer my things and chose hotels as that works for me given my location in Thailand and then hopefully the rest of south Asia. Each to is own. I still however keep my camping gear and from time to time add to it as I both enjoy having the best equipment I can find and the odd camping weekend, although those are few and far between and undertaken in China which is far less hot than Thailand. Snugpak being my current favorite. No kids, just the one wife, I deserve nice things and she deserves the odd weekend break away from me (She has no interest in camping or bikes).
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  6. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    I disagree that lightweight = less comfortable.

    I have a ground set up that is at least as comfortable as my bed at home, and weighs less than 10 lbs. I posted the items and weight here.

    I am also experimenting with hammocks. I'm looking for something that is comfortable, is easy to pack, and ideally packs small. Most who convert to hammocks say they're at least as comfortable as their regular bed. Entire hammock set ups typically weigh in at 7 lbs or less. I'm experimenting with this as an option for at least as much comfort and less pack volume and weight. I'm at 85 oz (5 lb) for a hammock, 20 degree down top quilt, 25 degree synthetic under quilt, 7'x10' tarp, 6 stakes and some zing-it cordage. I just ordered the UQ, but I believe it'll all fit in a 20L bag.
  7. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    Hammocks are good if you have trees, very easy to use and pack I have however also noted you need a good insulator under you as they are quite cold under you (Obviously if it is cold or cool weather, otherwise they are god to go), far more than you may think, maybe it all that air circulating. This was my answer although there are hundreds of options (Cocoon). I have used this and I have used a bivi bags as well as tents. I prefer the bivi as it can be used anywhere whereas the hammock is useless if there are no trees (Like Dubai). But a hammock if you have trees is probably the best all around (Like Romania) in my not so humble opinion. I have a fly sheet to cover this setup and keep the rain off, but to be honest have never used the fly sheet as it has never rained while I have been using the hammock, snug as a bug, works well. This cocoon unless it very cold indeed does away with a under insulator and a sleeping bag, its all in one, I used this quite a bit in Romania, some of the guy initially laughed at me, funny however as more than one soon followed. There are always the smart ass's

    Capture5678.PNG Capture56787.PNG
  8. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    It all depends on where you're camping! Northern Thailand, especially in the mountains is nice most of the year, ironically quite cold at night sometimes during hot season up in Nan. One of the coldest nights I've had camping was in the Western Forest Complex -- pretty far out in the forest so it cooled down fast. Camping on the beach in Southern Thailand while sea kayaking is hot, even with a hammock...

    But yes, the gear matters, both in terms of comfort and durability. I really like to have gear that can be either used backpacking or on the motorcycle, and some of the newer more innovative equipment really can do double duty very well.
  9. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I tried hammock camping but couldn't do it. Yes, they are very comfortable, but I'd quickly fall asleep, snore and wake myself up. Cycled all night. At home I sleep on my side and stomach. After two trips with hammocks, went back to tents. (or motels) I've struggled with getting enough sleep whenever I motorcycle camp, so I motel whenever I can. Took a two week western loop a few years ago. Sent camping gear home on day 5. I think I miss a lot by not camping, but I think its safer to get some sleep.
  10. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Old Dog

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    Yes to the beer!


    Mehhh to the chair choice
  11. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Yes to the beer, no to the hammock and priceless is not the only determining factor to quality but they often go hand in hand. sometimes it takes little extra research to find the best.
  12. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    I'm a side sleeper as well, but always sleep great in a hammock. Last trip I did was a combo of motel and camping. I forgot the cord to my CPAP on that trip so I was without it the whole time. I could barely sleep in the hotels because of my sleep apnea, but in the hammock I got much better sleep. Still had issues, but over all it was a much better sleep.
  13. dstutz

    dstutz Long timer

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    First trip I ever did in 2008:
    [​IMG]

    I had a laptop bag with laptop, a full size camping chair...no food or cooking equipment, no tools other than factory kit. 2 32L sidecases, a Helen 2 Wheels dry bag with sleeping bag, full size pillow (!), and a self-inflating pad.

    This year's trip:
    [​IMG]

    Homemade dehydrated meals, jet-boil clone, carrying some spare oil (It *is* a KTM) and tools, and the top 22L bag is maybe half-3/4 full.

    Like you all said, it's an evolution...Not bringing nearly as much spare clothing (owning more than 1 pair of Moto-Skiveez is too decadent for me) and upgrading to waterproof gear so not needing to stash liners really helps.
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  14. flei

    flei cycletherapist

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    Yes, I am aware of (relatively comfortable) state-of-the-art ultralight camping gear, and I have it.

    I also have (very comfortable) state-of-the-art large, heavy gear.

    I can choose which gear I want to bring. It's nice to have options.

    Scenario: It's 45F and raining; I want to cook dinner, then hang out, have a few beers, and read a good book before I change clothes and crawl into my bag. I'm old, so in the middle of the night I need to pee.

    Guess which gear I want to have with me in this scenario?

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    (P.S. this photo is missing my full-sized folding chair in the vestibule)
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  15. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    Id rather have the hammock ( with a larger tarp though) in 45 and raining.
    I certainly dont want to pack up that 200 square meteres of wet and heavy tent in the morning haha

    I can hang out, cook, read, drink beers, sleep well and piss under a hammock fly in 45 degree rain, no issues.
    Brutalguyracing likes this.
  16. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

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    For me, the cost is a HUGE concern. When I started camping from my motorcycle, in the late '70s, I learned from the other riders and they were concerned about the cost too. I don't recall there being nice nylon duffle bags available reasonably priced, if at all. I do remember a friend started making compression bags out of ripstop in the '80s and I learned to make bags from her. Looking back at my packing it is almost embarrassing but everyone else that I was around packed the same way.

    Today the cost is still a HUGE concern so I use inexpensive items and make them work. Until about 10 years ago I used the sleeping bag my Mom bought me when I was 12. I finally splurged and bought a Big Agnes bag which isn't holding up near as well as that old Coleman did and I used the Coleman a lot more in one year than I have used the BA.

    The first 10 years or so I slept in my tent with no pad and was fine doing that but then I had an accident and was a bit sore and needed to use a thermarest. I discovered I stayed warm doing that too. I also learned about heated grips and gear and now won't go without them now.

    When riding more than a day I carry full camping gear, including cooking things and food.

    My riding is miserable if I haven't had a good night's sleep so I carry what is needed to sleep well. A pillow is a necessity for me, I have tried camp pillows which are too small, stuffing clothes in a stuff bag which is too lumpy so I bring a full-sized pillow although one that isn't too full of stuffing.

    While I have aged I'm lucky I don't have too many aches and pains so I can still use the cheap stuff and do fine with it. It might be a little bulkier but if I can get it on the bike I'm good. I don't ride technical trails so the weight hasn't been a problem.

    Last year I hosted a campout for Beater Bikes, motorcycles that were obtained and made into running street-legal bikes for under $750. The goal is to introduce a way to have fun motorcycling without spending a large sum of money. A few older friends and I have decided to expand on the idea and we are going to have workshops this year. Some of the older riders are willing to pass their mechanical knowledge on to the newer riders. The goal is to make it possible for people who have tight finances to be able to enjoy what we enjoy.

    Reading most motorcycle forums, including ADV, it appears you have to have a lot of money to ride. ex: Klim Gear, KTM, MotoMosko packs, $500 tents, etc. etc. etc. It's nice if you can afford it but not everyone can.

    The link to the 2020 event is in my signature line and if you have any cheap suggestions I'd be happy to receive them through a PM

    Sorry - I got off subject so I will give you some pics of my bikes loaded. This is my progression and it changes often

    My '77 Yamaha XS750 - Just learning to camp from the MC. It ain't pretty but it sure was fun. :lol3
    XS750.JPG

    I learned to make bags and set up my '85 Harley FXRD for 6 months on the road camping the entire time with the exception of a few motel nights when the rain was coming down in buckets and flooding the area I was in. Full camping, cooking, tools and service manual. I didn't take much in the way of clothes but I took plenty of camping gear and I used it all. My old Coleman tent is with me on this ride.
    1990 4corners.JPG

    BMW F650GS packed for 10 days going to AK - I added more while in AK and the load wasn't near as neat on the way back. Most of the camping gear is in the boxes. When we left Spokane it was close to 100 degrees and I knew it was going to be colder where we were headed. On this trip I started wearing my mesh gear and in two days I had changed into my regular gear, electric jacket liner, and rain gear. I was glad I had the option. I stayed in the warmer gear until the day before getting home and I changed back into mesh.
    1bc-M[1].jpg

    Suzuki DR200 ready to go on the Best of Montana 1000 which was actually 1900 miles by the time I got home. A rotopax with a gallon of gas and another with a gallon of what was taken on this ride.
    a1.jpg
    This isn't camp from the MT ride but this is how I enjoy camping. I do have a small foldup table if there isn't a convenient piece of wood available.
    89-L[1].jpg

    Packed for a 5 day ride on the Magruder Corridor and Lolo Motorway. Extra fuel and water were taken on this ride too.
    23-X3.jpg
    Camp on the Magruder Corridor. The tent at the back is one of mine that I use when I need to take something small. It doesn't give me much room inside and it doesn't really pack up much smaller than my other tent.
    1239621_10200587171868985_1152495834_n.jpg

    My newest bike. Harley-Davidson XG750 Street which is marketed as an around-town bike. After the break-in miles I headed to WI. It was a challenge finding a way to pack for traveling & camping but I did it.
    103.JPG
    As you can see I make do with what I have and what I can get affordably. I'd rather spend the money on buying motorcycles and putting fuel in the tank so I can ride.

    I have a habit of buying bikes and not selling very many of them. The Harley hadn't been added to the stable yet so I need to take a new family photo. :clap 1.jpg :D

    Happy Riding! :clap

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  17. Dread

    Dread Putt-Putt Adventurer

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    THIS IS WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT!!!!!

    I love this post!!! I have an old 1991 KLR that I got super cheap, with lots of mechanical problems. I have been steadily working on it getting it back up to touring speed. It is hands down my favorite bike. No need to break the bank to adventure!!
  18. Sunday Rider

    Sunday Rider Adventurer Wanabe

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    Awesome post Ladybug.

    Thanks for the inspiration.
    Ladybug likes this.
  19. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    But if you don't spend it why make more?:lol3
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  20. ADVRKD

    ADVRKD Dharma Bum

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    Product warranty is important when buying gear. I bought a used Marmot tent in 2010 from an inmate. After using it two seasons some of the velcro attachments on the inside of the fly came off. I called Marmot and they said to send it to their warranty dept. I received an email shortly after they received it stating that in addition to the velcro bits falling off, the coating on the fly was de-laminating and since they did not have a replacement fly they were sending me a new tent. I've never been one to complain...

    After 7 years of use of the replacement tent, the tent fly began showing it's age. It started leaking at one of the seams, again the velcro bits were coming off and the last time I used it, the "tear drop" window just fell off. I sent the fly to the Marmot warranty dept. It took about a month, but they happily sent me a new fly. So my tent is refreshed and ready to be put back into service. This fly is made of heavier material and the velcro bits are sewn in. I'm a happy camper.

    Kudos to Marmot!


    Packed heavy...

    [​IMG]
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