let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Agreed, good warranty and service are worth a lot. Marmot has warrantied products for me too and have been very good. No matter what you paid for something if the company won't support you when you need it you'll never buy the brand again.
    ADVRKD likes this.
  2. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    As our camping gear set progresses over time a trail of discards and trial efforts lays out behind us...
  3. Gestalt

    Gestalt Been here awhile

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    As our camping gear set progresses over time a trail of discards and trial efforts lays out behind us...

    Never more true words spoken LOL, they do just get better and better.
  4. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    Unfortunately, my "discards" and trial efforts are stuffed in a walk in closet in my spare bedroom. Well, also on shelves in the spare bedroom. :lol2
  5. markinthailand

    markinthailand Long timer

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    The warranty stuff is real. I've had amazing experiences with Patagonia and some others for gear, including Klim, and it is one of the reasons I've found it worth it to get quality gear.

    That said, making do with what you've got is the name of the game! Doesn't matter what you've got, get out there!
    Kinsman and arr2 like this.
  6. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Swap meets are a great way to unload unused gear, like ladybug was saying this might give someone else with less $$ to spend a way to get new gear. Keeps more shit out of landfills too and opens up your closet space.
  7. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Mosko R40 and a Nomad tank bag.

    [​IMG]

    Deployed.

    [​IMG]
  8. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    How do you like the Nomad on that bike?
  9. SEK_Nick

    SEK_Nick Been here awhile

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    I am shopping for a new tent - I got about 3 years out of my $30 wal-mart special, enough to know that I'm ready to upgrade to a "real" tent. Right now I'm looking at the Eureka Suma 2 person. I'll be solo-camping. I like to bring my boots and whatnot in at night. The pics I've seen indicate that there should be plenty of room for me and my gear in the Suma 2.

    How is Eureka as a brand? Good warranty service & customer care?
  10. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Depending how big you want to go I have an MSR Hubba Hubba and love it for Moto camping.
  11. Dread

    Dread Putt-Putt Adventurer

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    I've had three Eureka tents and they are a good value brand. In fact my first one was a single walled Zeus 1 model, no longer made, and it is still going after 12 years. They are on the lower end of the "real tent scale" and there are other good tents out there to look at. But I do think it is a fine brand, lots of folks use them.
  12. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    I really like how organized I can keep a lot of gear. I carry electronics, cords, toothbrush, toothpaste, multitool, documents, snacks, sunglasses, wallet and some other things I need quickly. On the Acerbis tank, it kinks the vent hose, but that has not caused a problem, yet. There is a 90-degree vent hose somewhere to buy on the interweb if I ever find it to be a problem.

    You can see there is a little dead space between the Nomad and the tank.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    In the future, I may utilize that dead space for carrying my rain jacket. I think it will fit in the space fine.

    I took in on my GSA on the MABDR where it rained on my wife and I every day but one day (9 days out total) and the rain cover kept everything dry.

    [​IMG]

    Swapping between bikes will necessitate the purchase of a harness and attachment straps for each bike if you don't want to swap those between bikes.

    Gas stops are pretty simple. I loosen the side straps, unbuckle the harness, fold the bag onto the seat, then reverse when I am finished.

    I don't use the water bladder anymore because it is too little water to hassle with the loading/unloading of the bladder. But, I consume a lot of water, usually no less than 1 gallon per day, so my 3L camelback suits me better, is easier to fill at gas stops, and easier to filter water straight into the bladder at creeks. If you require less water, you may have a different experience.

    Now the real test: Can I get up on the pegs for steep, technical climbs? Well, mostly. The profile is low enough that I can straddle the tank bag, but I worry what might happen to my junk if I am ever in that position and encounter something that...well, you get the picture. It hasn't happened yet, but it's always in the back of my mind. For just normal on-the-peg riding, it does not encumber my riding.

    This was some techy single track I rode with the Nomad and R40, fully loaded for camping off the bike for a couple days. It got much worse than what is in the photo, but I made it through.

    [​IMG]

    Video of that trail (not mine). The switchback in the above photo is at 00:40.



    This was another over-nighter where I was trying out some new gear. I rode stuff like this all day and do not feel like the Nomad inhibited my riding, but there was nothing super steep or technical. Mostly just bushwacking seldom-used single track until the trail became impassable. I wasn't really trying to go from point A to point B, rather just testing how the gear would ride.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I have a love/hate relationship with tank bags. I have used at least 7 different tankbags over the years. Love the convenience, but hate how they get in the way of standing while riding. I think the MM Nomad has been the best compromise so far. Previously I used a GL Buck and Roll on the 500, which was great except it was like a bathtub in torrential rains. If I have a trip planned where I know I will be on lots of steep and technical climbs, I will use the Buck and Roll, but need to store everything in zip-locks.

    The Buck and Roll:

    [​IMG]

    Probably a more verbose answer than you wanted, but it's cold outside and there isn't any football on tonight.
    WRW9751, globalt38, Maggot12 and 4 others like this.
  13. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    I already have a Nomad that I'm running on 3 bikes, BMW R65 LS, R1100 S, KTM 640 Adventure. It works great on street bikes and I too really like the organization. I'm just waiting to get the Acerbis super tanker for my 525 for Siberia and am looking to run the Nomad on that too. It fits about the same as yours on the MDX and Clark tanks but as the motor is out right now I haven't had a chance to ride with it. Pete and I were talking about the Pico at the MOA rally and he felt the Nomad would be better on the 525.

    As for gassing up I just pop the from 2 buckles and slide the bag back, I find it easier than undoing side buckles.
  14. Rock709

    Rock709 Been here awhile

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    On my 1290R I use Touratech Zega Pros 31/38 and a Pelican 1500 top case for camping trips. Everything fits inside the waterproof cases except my Helinox Chair. The storage bag for the chair has a loop on each end that fits the grab handles on the back perfectly. The nice things about the Zega Pros is that they have a coating on the aluminum which keeps your gear clean from the aluminum. And the racks are painted stainless steel.
    IMG_0420.jpg


    My every day riding I switch out the 1500 Pelican for a 1400 Pelican. And nice of Pelican to offer these cases in KTM orange :super
    IMG_1041.jpg


    A good tent is my most important thing to have, good quality, light weight, quick setup and packs well. But most importantly, the MSR Hubba Hubba has 100% of the walls made with mesh, therefore there will never be wet/damp walls from condensation or rain. The FULL outer fly keeps all the moisture from getting inside.
    IMG_0501.jpg IMG_0510.jpg


    Below is my OLD vs NEW sleeping pad. Lots of space and weight can be saved by shopping around. My old pad was a self inflating mattress, which was too long to pack in my cases, not light and not much better than sleeping on the ground alone. The new one is a Nemo Cosmo sleeping pad. Some of the nice features:
    -built in manual pump, inflates quickly
    -dump valve releases air instantly
    -thermal material
    -folds small and light weight
    -comfortable
    IMG_2096.jpg
  15. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    Years back I some how lost an aluminum ring from one corner of my old Eureka Timberline. When I got home I emailed them, not expecting much (the tent was 20+ years old). An hour later I got a reply...replacement was on the way. 48 hours later it slid through my mail slot at home, free of charge. Needless to say, my next tent was a Eureka.
  16. doc moses

    doc moses fearlessly flatulent

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    I have early memories of my dad hooking up a Korean conflict vintage "Army Officers Tent Stove". That stove heated canvas tents all over Ohio hills and Va mountains and eventually a small cabin my parents built. Then some time after I left my parents home it disappeared. In 2000 or so I found an online place selling the m1941 stove (with liquid fuel manifold and solid fuel grate ) shipped for under 150 and I figured that was cheap a piece of nostalgia as I could find. It came in the original box with wrenches, 12' of 4" stack, a manual and 10' or so of 1950s rubber fuel line; and it was painted/caked in cosmoline. I used it in my garage for awhile. Then it went into dry storage. This past July we bought our last forever home whic DP0A0495.JPG h has a big room (its a ranch house built 1958 with the great room addition built '73) and yesterday I dry fitted the stove to the new room. (I had not done a stove install since like 1990 and I still hate everything to do with working around a damper it turns out) . Anyhow, where was I? I love this thing.
  17. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil.

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    That is very cool. The one I saw and used for a short period of time was different. It was square and sat horizontally.

    [​IMG]
    It was like this one. A Yukon stove M1950. I thought that it was very cool and the whole stove could be packed up in itself. You can see the drip tube on this one. We could attach that directly to a 5 gallon Jerry can outside the tent to feed the fuel. I only saw it burning diesel but it was supposed to run on lots of other fuels as well as coal and wood if necessary. I was very impressed with that stove.

    KR
  18. doc moses

    doc moses fearlessly flatulent

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    So this led to going down a rabbit hole this morning! I wasn’t aware this style stove burned multi fuel also. I wasn’t aware this style stove was a US military thing at all. Definitely helps explain a conversation I had with an older guy two days ago. In the early 1960s he operated the day to day stuff at the salvage facility for USAF at Minot. ( sounds like a cool job). He was talking about square stoves. Makes sense now.
    CavReconSGT likes this.
  19. globalt38

    globalt38 "A Fist Full of Throttle" Super Supporter

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    Both types of stove still heated canvas army tents I slept or worked in during the 90's. One of those things that, at least at the time, the Army apparently believed "If it ain't broke - don't fix it"
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  20. Pathfinders

    Pathfinders Long timer

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    I know that stove kept me and a GP Small tent warm in the 80's and 90's. We had it so hot one winter in Germany that the stove pipe was red and looked like a beacon for dumb Army privates.
    MickeyDee, CavReconSGT and globalt38 like this.