let's see a picture of your camping setup and how it all fits on your bike... please

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ClearwaterBMW, Jun 8, 2007.

  1. a2zworks

    a2zworks Trust me, I'm Pablo

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    I thought those tents were really expensive, but they are not really and look really nice.
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  2. tomcat125

    tomcat125 Lazy Bum

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    Thanks for that, just found those stakes on Anazon. Got some on the way.
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  3. BLucare

    BLucare What could possibly go wrong?

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    I thought the same thing, and so kinda wrote them off as I didn't mind my old tent, which wasn't that old anyway. Some of the other BA bikepacking tents are indeed like $500+, but then I found this one and couldn't pass it up. I think it is a bit heavier than the Copper Spur and others, which might matter for more for backpacking, but for motocamping this is just fine.

    Good stuff! I have some very similar TNH Y-shaped stakes that I got a few years ago. The Y-shape/tri-blade shape makes a huge difference over the cheap aluminum hook style. It works especially well if you angle them toward the tent, so any resistance is pulling upward against the direction of the stake. It's like concrete.
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  4. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    MSR Groundhog stakes have been around a long time. Swapping out stock stakes for the groundhogs when getting a new tent was common for me until I got my last tent. It came with V-peg stakes which are almost as good as the Groundhogs.

    [​IMG]

    I did add pull strings from paracord to make removal easier.
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  5. tomcat125

    tomcat125 Lazy Bum

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    I have some y shaped ones but they are a bit too thin. I have bent a few by accidentally stepping on them at night. One of them barefoot! Ouch! Put a nice v shaped hole in my foot. Not fun riding the next 3 days with foot bleeding. :lol3
  6. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

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    I bought a Big Agnes Tiger Wall UL2 tent and I love it, actually I got the three person version. I had a hard time justifying to myself spending that much money but I finally did it. I bought it through Moto Camp Nerd using the ADV discount code that can be found in vendors.

    It has all the feature I wanted and the stakes are so light and work great.
  7. BLucare

    BLucare What could possibly go wrong?

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    Yep, I really like that model, too. It's great that BA has answered the call that moto-campers have been making for years: Give us a more easily packable, lightweight tent, please :D

    We all know the saying: Buy once, cry once. :lol3
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  8. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    I run the Big Agnes Copper Spur HV UL - also a 3 person. I've been using 3 person tents for motocamping for 20+ years. I have found a 3 person is the perfect size for me and bringing all my moto gear inside. The $500 price tag was painful - but it packs far smaller than my cheap 1 person tent.
    It comes in a brighter color option but I went for the stealthy option in case I need to camp somewhere I shouldn't :D

    It literally takes "zero" space because my sleeping bag gets put in a round stuff sack and then put in the panier and then the tent fits in the "airspace" between the round stuff sack and square panier wall - so I still only take up the space my sleeping bag takes :norton

    I also really like that the fly, poles, and tent have color coordinated connectors so there is no "which way does this go". Connect the grey to the grey, the copper to the copper - job done :D

    Photo from last weekend (no stakes used - tent freestanding) :
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  9. Ladybug

    Ladybug Bug Sister Supporter

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    I totally agree about the 3 person tent so it's big enough to bring my gear in. I don't leave things under the vestibule since that is still open for insects to be able to get to the stuff. My tent is also a blah color (beige) which is fine by me.

    Another thing I really like about the BA is how the poles clip into place when setting it up. No more wild pole coming out of it's ring just when I think I have them all in place.

    Right now I'm on a month long ride and in one of my side bags is a chair, tiny table, tent and bike cover. The bags aren't that huge but it all fits.

    I haven't achieved minimal but I have everything I need. This is my street/traveling bike.
    9-28-21 Midpoint.jpg
  10. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    The Hubba Hubba says 2 person tent but the 2 vestibules make it totally good with plenty of space for gear. The red makes for a reasonable colour. Plenty of height to sit up of kneel up. Same the fly is colour coded for connections and agreed the clips work well on the single pole setup. I find it a very well built quality tent but the last time I was in the rain I had water inside so I'm not sure the fly is still waterproof.
  11. DSquared

    DSquared Dilly Dilly! Supporter

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    I like my Hubba Hubba but the moisture I have found was due to condensation. Opening the vestibule zippers from the top and bottom about 6"(150mm) helped mitigate a lot of that. Obviously the ability to do that depends on the forecast and how much you have stored in the vestibule.
  12. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    New items added to my moto camping kit that had a big impact this past weekend:

    [​IMG]

    -Gigapump: Blowing up my air mattress has always been one of my least favorite things about camping. We often camp at 11,000+ feet and there's no freaking oxygen :DThis little usb-rechargeable lithium powered pump filled my q-core deluxe air mattress in under a minute making me way happier than I should have been :wings . It also has a diffused light and a "hanging loop" so I stopped carrying my in-tent lantern and now use this instead.

    -Tesla lighter: USB rechargeable lighter. I used to carry a traditional lighter but of course you run out of butane, the flint wears out, it won't ignite at altitude, etc. The one works 100% of the time - even at altitude. I never have to worry about butane again. It also has an LED light so I use it as my camp flashlight since it is already in my pocket

    -USB Lithium Power Brick (with solar): This particular one can charge 3 devices simultaneously and has a phone wireless Qi charger built in. So in my tent at night I plug my Cardo in and sit my phone on top of it and I'm ready to go the next morning. It can also recharge both of the devices listed above. It also happens to have a flashlight if the other two die :D

    -Leatherman flatbits: My toolkit has a habit of bloating with redundancy. I picked up this screwdriver bit set for my leatherman and replaced ALL of the screwdrivers I had. It has all of the torx bits matching the screws the BMW is covered with.

    @RyanW
  13. globalt38

    globalt38 "A Fist Full of Throttle" Super Supporter

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    Nice post with some great thoughts/tips!
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  14. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Hold fucking fast Supporter

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    Brand of the power brick please and thank you?
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  15. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    I got it on amazon... Blavor
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  16. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Hold fucking fast Supporter

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    Thanks!
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  17. dasgaswolf

    dasgaswolf bruh. Supporter

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    Does the solar actually work? Doesn't seem like that tiny panel would do much?
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  18. Geek

    Geek oot & aboot

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    :dunno
    I think it puts in some ridiculously low amount like 300mah - so it might recharge itself fully in 6 months? :rofl
    The entire brick charges off of USB (I can charge it while riding) and it'll charge my phone something like 4 times.

    ...except in that situation where it is the end of the world, my lighter is dead, my battery is dead, and in 3 or 4 weeks I'll be able to recharge the tesla lighter and start a fire! :gdog :photog

    (I bought it for its capacity, the ability to charge 3 devices simultaneous with 18 watts of USB output, and 10 watt wireless phone charger. The solar just happens to be there :D ).

    :beer
  19. ScottTheFalcon

    ScottTheFalcon Been here awhile

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    A very good solar panel of that size will produce about 2.4W for about 5 hours per day (13.5Wh). If it's a 10,000mAh battery that's 37Wh. In a really ideal world it would take 3 days to charge, but with charging losses, the battery pack will get hot in the sun, cheap solar cell, and many more "and so on" factors - I'd guess a week would do it. So for the Zombie Apocalypse I think it would help...
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  20. BLucare

    BLucare What could possibly go wrong?

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    Another vote for investing in a quality power brick/portable USB battery pack thingamajig. They come in all different sizes. We bought one made by Anker a couple years ago before a two-week trip to Europe, large enough to charge a phone probably 4-5 times, but small enough to fit in a pants pocket while out walking. It was a lifesaver, and really eliminated any anxiety about phones dying. It fits easily in a tank bag, and recharges fully within a couple hours on or off the bike.

    As a specifically nice feature for moto travelers, it can charge devices in a tank bag out of the rain, without needing to run a cable into the bag from the bike. It's great if you already have one device plugged into an external USB charger on the bike (GPS, most likely).