Lets see your lightweight camping setup!!

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by 5 speed, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. Wayne Weber

    Wayne Weber why are we stopping?

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    Here's our set up for 2 up camping. It all fits in 2 Jesse's, no strapped on stuff.

    [​IMG]

    Main points:

    1lb Western Mountaineering down bags
    1lb Thermarest (ultralite 48")
    no stove etc.
    Mountain hardware Hammerhead II tent. 7lbs but it works great.
    Teva's for town/camp shoes.

    I could pack lighter, but this works.
    #21
  2. tbirdsp

    tbirdsp REMF

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    Holy cow, 25 MPG?!
    My DRZ would go 200+ miles with a Clarke 3.9
    Haven't ridden my KLR much yet, but I think it will get 40 MPG at the worst and it has a 6.1 gal tank.
    #22
  3. dwrads

    dwrads Right Wristed

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    Hey Blueman the first picture is in Baja near Mikes Sky rancho.

    I almsot never use prepackaged dehydrated food. Tastes like crap and isn't all that great for you. When moto camping we often get food at the last gas stop/town. Fresh food is best though it weighs more, but since I plan on consuming it soon after purchase it's worth the weight. There should never be a problem gatting and having enough substance. Fresh food can include a steak or whatever! We use the foil cooking with tortillas and salsa alot becauseit's easy. No equipment required, as long as your in a where you can have a fire.

    As for range it all depends on were your trying to get/go. Multiple days without gas is pretty hard to do. I doubt that most need the 300+ mile range some here have been discussing. With my XRR the farthest I've gone between food and gas is 1 1/2 days and 300 miles. Yes the packs were heavy but not for long. Just get out there with what you have and don't be afraid to get by with less.

    One more good thing about a lightweight approach to camping, it's easier to camp just about anywhere and the impact to the site is much lower. Of course different parts of the country have different limitations to what you can do.

    DW
    #23
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  4. ditchbanker

    ditchbanker Owner of dull user line

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    I'm going to throw out some wisdom from the voice of inexperience. I tried my first camping trip last weekend and learned just a couple things that I hope I can save another inexperienced rider from experiencing.
    First, don't push the limits of your sleeping bag. 5 degrees + 20 degree sleeping bag=frostbite+no sleep.
    Second thing: I tried to be cheap by packing all of my equipment on the bike rack in a giant duffel bag. Plus the fact that I had some stuff I didn't need (giant freaking tarp chief among my space wasting) made the handling terrible. On paved corners, it leaned way sharper than I intended, on dirt it made the riding way inferior. I had to be concerned about what the load was doing on whoops, wondering if I was stressing my sub frame, etc. I'm going to be getting some real luggage so that I don't have to stop and address those things as much. Get the weight low.
    #24
  5. rapiti

    rapiti IOR Veteran

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    That's when you carefully select a rock from the fire, wrap it in your shittiest garment, so it doesn't melt your bag, and warm your toes back up.



    ...Or there's that cowboy movie technique :bluduh

    Yup :thumb
    #25
  6. ditchbanker

    ditchbanker Owner of dull user line

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    I had tossed a pair of grip warmers in my pocket before I left. I put those between sock layers and I think that kept the 'bite to a minimum. Trust me, by the time my feet were that cold, the rocks from the fire were downright frosty.
    #26
  7. GaM

    GaM Long timer

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    Small Ti Pot and everthiing small fits in it such as pocket rocket stove, stainless steel cup, small led headlamp, pocket knife, tea, coffee, bandanna; Big Agnes SL2 - 3lb. 6.0 oz (fly, pole, body); Western Mountaineering Megalite bag - 1 b. 8 oz.; old 3/4 length close celled foam Cascade designs pad- don't know but it's about a light as you can get. I don't like it because of the volume, and volume is a bigger problem than weight. I have a big Agnes Aircore pad, which has a very low packed volume, but mine has a super small leak which I can't find. I put the (**& thing in the bath tub and can't find a bubble trail the leak is so small. I blow it up at night and it's flat when I wake up in the morning. I was using a Bibler Anawahnee that I have many many years and spent hundreds of nights in all over the country. The zippers finally gave out, it is still perfectly water proof, they said replacing the zippers would proababy cost as much as a new one. I'll probably get another Bibler, its give a great feeling of security that no matter how bad things get, it's not going to come in on you. That brown bag next to the water bottles is an MRE, I buy them by the case.
    [​IMG]
    #27
  8. SteveBroskey

    SteveBroskey Teach me this knowledge

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    that looks glorious
    #28
  9. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah, what DWRADS said about food. Most bike trips involve plenty of road, so eat before you hit the trail & plan on buy a can of soup before you leave the road. Yeah, I usually carry Rycrisp, Fig Newtons, gorp, etc and I always take my stove & coffee pot (and a flask of Bushmills) no need to be uncivilized.

    I also try to have enough gas to do what I want no worries, and not carry any extra. A half tank on the KLR is more fuel (weight) that a lot other bikes have when full.
    #29
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  10. Doghouse_Riley

    Doghouse_Riley Wannabe Adventure Tourer

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    I've incorporated Jardine's philosophy into my backpacking and by extension it'll be part of my adventure motorcycling. As it pertains to motorcycling I believe that two things are paramount: 1) ditch the tent and get a tarp and 2) ditch the sleeping bag and get a quilt. Alternatively I say ditch the tent and get a Hennesy hammock and ditch the sleeping bag for a Big Agness sleep system. Tent and sleeping bag are two of the heaviest and bulkiest items and will have the biggest effect on scaling down your camping setup.

    The next thing I plan on trying is a coke can stove so I can retire my MSR Whisperlight.
    #30
  11. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    Maybe a side note but here's what kills you the quickest in the wilderness if you don't have it (in order): First aid, shelter, water, food. An arguement could be made that water moves up one notch in a pure desert environment.
    #31
  12. ditchbanker

    ditchbanker Owner of dull user line

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    Could you tell me a little more about this? It seems that a lot of people are "kind" enough to leave "stoves" wherever one could possibly need one. Do you just fill it with gas and go?
    #32
  13. rokklym

    rokklym one man wolfpack

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    Have you ever used one of these? They are pretty cool! I was at a mountaineering class last fall and they made some, but I showed up late and didn't want to hold them up, so I didn't make one myself.

    Here is what is says on Wikpedia:
    A beverage-can stove is a homemade, ultra-light portable stove. The simple design is made entirely from cans (typically soft drink or beer cans) and burns alcohol (typically denatured). Countless variations on the basic design exist. Pepsi-brand aluminum cans are often used because they have a bottom shape that lends itself to securing the stove's inner wall, and because of this the stoves are sometimes called Pepsi-can stoves. The stove weighs 0.4 oz (10 g) and will boil two cups of water in five minutes with two tablespoons of fuel. Total weight, including a windscreen/stand can be less than one ounce (30 g). Due to the low weight compared to some commercial stoves, backpackers can reduce some pack weight with this stove, which makes this design popular among ultralight backpackers. This advantage may be lost or reduced on hiking trips that feature longer gaps between resupply stops, however, because the stove is less efficient and requires more fuel than alternatives such as Esbit tabs, especially when cooking for more than one person.

    Link: includes instructions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soda_can_stove

    My snowpeak gigapower setup is so small that I think I'll use that most of the time though.

    Soda can stove:
    [​IMG]

    Snowpeak stove: everything fits in the cup
    [​IMG]
    #33
  14. beerjonny

    beerjonny Planning mode...

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    Well I've learned alot over the last several years as the number of times I camp per year has gone up along with the dificulty rating of the trails we drive while camping... If I knew how to post several pictures in the same thread I could show you a little. :ear I'll get my packlist as well...
    #34
  15. ekaphoto

    ekaphoto Been here awhile

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    I pack pretty light for my camping trips. I usually just take a credit card. :evil

    Just kidding. The Hennessey Hammock for warmish weather or for cold climates the blackdiamond mega lite tent. I have a couple of diffrent bags depending on tempture. My last camping trip (non motorcycle) I took a queen size inflateable bed and threw a pad on top for insulation. My buddy in the tent next to me had a hard time sleeping from my snoring. :rofl
    #35
  16. d2wing

    d2wing Been here awhile

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    I use a small Eureka backpacker tent, a Therma-rest pad, a sleeping bag with a stuff sack, inflatable pillow and a tripod folding stool. All this fits in a
    bag that goes into my trunk or can be tied on depending on where I'm going and what else I bring. I like to bring firestarters, little chemical heaters and poly long johns for cold nights. Wetwipes are great if you need to clean up without water. Another thing is to bring old undies and toss 'em instead of washing. Buy new as you go if you need to.
    #36
  17. 5 speed

    5 speed Long timer

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    Guys all great suggestions. I actually bought a pepsi can stove for 4.00 and its riveted to add some strength. about all I plan on doing with it is heating up some precooked food and some coffee in the morning. The sleeping bag thing is very much known to me and I have frozen my tail off before. I always use one rated at least 15 degrees F. below the coldest I expect. I am going with a candle lantern to save some weight and lexan utensils. I need one small pot or cup really would be good enough. I cant wait to try it out.
    How about wildlife at night? I know there are black bears, pigs, rattlesnakes and then all the usual critters. I have a small boat airhorn that I figured would scare the bears away if the come snooping and I dont plan to have any food in my tent and certainly none that is not prepackaged regardless. The main meal will be long gone by that point with no remnants.
    #37
  18. Doghouse_Riley

    Doghouse_Riley Wannabe Adventure Tourer

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    My philosophy on wildlife is I leave them alone and they leave me alone. Works here in the west anyway. The exeption is black bears. I bear bag my food and toiletries. I've thought about getting an ursack: http://www.ursack.com/
    Also, when the weather is warm I'm more vigilant about watching for rattlesnakes when I'm hiking. I've come close to accidently stepping on a rattler a couple times when they're sunning themselves on the trail I was hiking on.
    #38
  19. Johnny KLR

    Johnny KLR Woefully Adventurous

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    Better yet...

    not so carefully select all the rocks from around the fire, put them in a very shallow pit about the size of your bag and put dirt back over them. Lay bag on top of dirt, and enjoy a heated bed.
    #39
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  20. Sqwap

    Sqwap WYO ADV Rider

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    Not show: clothes or food

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    #40