Lets see your lightweight camping setup!!

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by 5 speed, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    I dunno about that, do you really wanna be that close to all them dudes? :imaposer
  2. nuggets

    nuggets It's all my fault...

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    While there's beer.... :kumbaya
    After the beer runs out, you gotta get under your own tarp :deal


    Awww... what the hell...

    I'll share my backpack story. You didn't ask, but anyway... :D

    I wore a backpacking backpack one year, with all my gear in it. About 30lbs for a week offroad/forest road trip. If I set the straps right, I could rest the bottom on the seat so it was less tiring. I could ride standing up, but it was harder. I made it work.

    In one water crossing, I ate shit, pretty much a belly flop right into the rocks. That 30lbs of backpack following me down and putting another hit on me didn't feel too great either.

    Now, you can wear a pack or not, and that's fine with me. I won't feel the weight of your pack. :ricky
    GravelRider likes this.
  3. jackbyo

    jackbyo @sunnysideup_mc

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    I've used bungees and rok straps, and the rok straps are far better.

    GCAG straps look even like an even better design than rok straps
  4. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    ok, so rok straps for the jet boil

    bungees for the Coleman stove

    and Green Chili adventure straps for the gallon of Rotella!

    got it, thanks!
  5. chris73

    chris73 Been here awhile

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    Double d ring straps will ensure the penzoil will not spill, causing your tkc80s to spin out, resulting in a high side crash and subsequently crushing your msr dragonfly...














    Which is stored unsafely in your backpack because you didn't want to bring your aluminium panniers due to the fear that you would destroy your ankle in a low side.
    mouthfulloflake likes this.
  6. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    as long as you stand up on the pegs to lower your center of gravity, while counter steering, and wear only a $8.1 million helmet for a $398 head.
  7. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    So let me get this straight. I can't use a backpack to carry my Rotella so my engine locks up. I'm stranded miles from nowhere and die from dehydration because I couldn't carry a backpack with a hydration bladder because it's not safe.:roflI didn't realize how unsafe I've been all these years guess its a good thing I haven't taken an advanced physics class.
    Pch123 likes this.
  8. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Any chance at this point we can let the backpack discussion die a lonely, undignified death?
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  9. Albie

    Albie Kool Aid poisoner

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    You'll be OK, so long as you bring a tarp. If you do take along a hydration pack, just don't drink too much of the Rotella, it'll give you the runs.
    ben2go likes this.
  10. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    Agreed. Unless someone's got another backpack pic to share. Especially one carrying rotella in the backpack.:imaposer
  11. Sitheach86

    Sitheach86 Long timer

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    Don't be talking bad about rotella! I run it in both of our work trucks. 2003 with 1.7m miles and a 1998 with 2.3m miles.
  12. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    I'm guessing you didn't drive those kind of miles while wearing a backpack.
  13. motomecha

    motomecha Adventurer

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    Was an awesome thread......now ruined ha ha ha
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  14. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    It'll find its way again... always does.
  15. AGrant

    AGrant Been here awhile

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    So a backpack and a gallon of Rotella walk into a bar...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  16. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    Ok now back to our regular scheduled program. 20160801_183111.jpg
  17. CloudSplitter

    CloudSplitter Putterer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Northern West Virginia
    Cooking: I'm with the no-stove contingent. Have 2 Sveas, but bought a Whisper Lite for doing the TransAmerica Trail. Used it once, but it killed time. Now I just carry food to eat cold.

    Campfire: Don't do that, either. Grew up in Oregon, where we always had a cheery fire, but living in the Northeast has a different ethic. Could build fires, but it uses up the local wood supply.

    Pots: No stove and no fire means you don't need pots. Well, in the Northeast, you kind of need them to protect your food from mice, or they'll chew holes in your tent, backpack, etc.

    Tent: used to have a cheap, one-wall, puptent, with a vertical pole at each end and mosquito netting all over one side, and a flap to cover that. Wish I could get another one like it. Now I have three different camping tents, and am not real happy with any of them:
    1. One-man tent: this is nice and light, but just too small for comfort.
    2. Two-man tent with mosquito netting on both sides, and a fly. Would be good, but the bottom of the netting is too high. You can't see out while lying down.
    3. Four-man Timberline: a great tent, has lasted about 50 years, and new ones cost a fortune, but way too big and heavy for solo camping.

    Clothes: Three spare changes of underwear and socks. I normally wear briefs, but found the bottom seams cause big, long, blisters after a few days. Now I alternate between white boxer shorts one day, and motorcycle shorts the next.
    The socks are all over-the calf length wool blend, mostly Smart Wool, but a few other brands are as good, except for the neat stripe around the heel, to help align them when you put 'em on.
    If you ever get your calf hard against a hot exhaust, while wearing synthetic pants, you'll know why I use long wool socks.
    One light pair of long pants, in addition to the motorcycle pants I wear all day. One long sleeve shirt, in addition to the one I wear all day. One Tilley Hat, for rain in camp.
    One motorcycle jacket liner, and one wettable vest (light and warm when dry).
    One Frog Toggs rain suit.
    One silk balaclava (when expecting real cold, I add a wool balaclava and mittens)
    One pair spare gloves.
    One pair synthetic long johns.
    One ADVrider polo shirt.
    One of each of the above clothes goes in a day pack, all in zip-lock bags. Total weight: about six pounds.

    Tank bag has a pint of engine oil (for chain and tipping up), two tire irons, a front-tire-tube, a bicycle pump, a collapsible aluminum "stick" to support the bike opposite the kick stand, an emergency starter battery (fuel injection means hard to start with dead battery), some food, small "goggles" for backup, two spare lenses for my motocross goggles, and electronics for motel use.

    The 40-liter dry bag, in back, holds tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, spare parts, a second bicycle pump, clothes not in the day pack, first-aid-kit, survival kit, and a block-and-tackle on long trips.
    If I stop in a motel, this dry bag usually stays on the bike (hasn't been molested, yet).

    All valuables in pockets, including one mobile phone for each type of service (GSM and CDMA).
    Spot on top of the day pack (new this year, to give me more peace of mind).
    No camera (bought one for the TAT, but only used it twice, and couldn't post the pics 'till I got home -- all other pictures were with my smart phone, which makes them easy to post)
    Two or three water bottles in each chest pocket of motorcycle jacket (when traveling light, only a 10 oz bottle and a half-full 12 oz bottle on each side). These give a LITTLE chest protection.
    .
    overlander, kmhamlin and ProLeisure like this.
  18. MotoBoss

    MotoBoss Old Dog

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  19. Stuskie

    Stuskie Adventurer

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    3 weeks ago in the Sawtooth Mountains, near Stanley Idaho. Not ideal for light weight but comfortable. DSCF0372.JPG DSCF0388.JPG
    mouthfulloflake likes this.
  20. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Everyone does what they like in regards to packing. Strange how some get on their high horse about whats the only way people should be packing.

    Years ago I rode with a large backpack.

    [​IMG]

    Getting the KTM 525 off the other side of the Mekong river in Laos.
    It worked and was reliable. Something I can say not all name brand luggage I have experienced display sadly. All my riding is focused on off road technical riding. It got through fine. Was it perfect, no........then again no luggage I have tried has been: Giantloop, Altrider, Kriega, Dirt Bagz etc. all have their downsides.

    I'm happy to see people getting out there and enjoying this sport and enjoying themselves. Thats the important thing to remember as it sure beats the hell out of sitting in front of the TV with which the majority of the population seem to be content. All our needs, budgets, capabilities etc are different, and it matters naught if we're in the latest Klim riding gear or some old Levis as long as we're out having fun. The guy was comfortable with his backpack and it works for multiple disciplines. Good on him for enjoying his ride and sharing his experience.

    I was looking for an ol picture and laughed as I found some riding pics from a few years ago. here is about 2007 packing for a month long off road ride through 3 countries.

    Look how I packed then:

    [​IMG]

    and loaded into the very first Giantloop Coyote. Made from Cordura with small zippers to access the pack. Bombproof but not ideal. It worked and my important stuff remained dry. Though bulk was rearing its head haha.

    [​IMG]

    Flash forward 10 years and see how the streamlining has had it's effect . Here packed for 3 weeks off road in Cambodia.

    [​IMG]

    Shoved into Kriega Overlamder 30's.......sadly they failed miserably on me during the trip.

    [​IMG]


    A lot less bulk yet same capabilities. Even ol dogs can learn new tricks.

    Excited to see how everything gets packed on the bikes in another 10 years to experience life and have fun with mates on the bikes in the future.