Lets see your lightweight camping setup!!

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by 5 speed, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. BornAgain

    BornAgain Been here awhile

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    I'm happy to see people getting out there and enjoying this sport and enjoying themselves. Thats the important thing to remember as it sure beats the hell out of sitting in front of the TV with which the majority of the population seem to be content. All our needs, budgets, capabilities etc are different, and it matters naught if we're in the latest Klim riding gear or some old Levis as long as we're out having fun. The guy was comfortable with his backpack and it works for multiple disciplines. Good on him for enjoying his ride and sharing his experience.



    That my friends is what its all about. Well said Team!
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  2. Stuskie

    Stuskie Adventurer

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    I agree with you Born Again. It's fun just getting out and using what works for me. I refine my gear after each trip instead of over thinking everything to the point of never actually going anywhere.
  3. mslim

    mslim If it's worth doing... it's worth overdoing

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    I'm embarassed to post after teamftb but here goes for the more casual rider/campers among you.

    I'm an old (in both meanings of the word) backpacker/camper. Moto camping is a different mindset for me. All of a sudden volume matters more than weight. I have an Airhead with a set of BMW Tour Cases and a Wolfman Expedition large duffel I bought here in Flea Market. Since I don't have a tank bag, left hand Tour Case holds quart of oil, extra clothing layer, rain gear, maps, and water. Right hand case holds clothing in a dry bag. The Wolfman duffel is crossed strapped with Rok Straps and holds:
    • Primus Classic Trail Stove: (I also have a SVEA 123 but the gas cylinder is more convenient when I'm primarily just boiling water for coffee and freeze dried)
    • Optimus Terra Weekend HE .95L cookset: (I balked at paying $30 for this but it is well made and works good.) Measuring lines are stamped into the metal and it pours hot water without spilling it. (Just remember to deploy the handles before putting the heat to it or else you toast the silicone coating on them) The HE feature is not a gimmick and it boils water fast.
    • 230 gram gas cylinder for stove and stores in the cookset.
    • 2x Nalgene military format 1 liter canteens
    • some sort of 4-6 liter water bladder for camp (my old Sova bag started leaking on this trip, so I'll probably replace it with a Dromlite or equivalent.)
    • Sea to Summit long spoon: (for reaching into freeze dried or boil-in-bag pouches without getting food on your fingers)
    • Kelty Salida: "2-man" tent (I borrowed this from my buddy Kaviski and it works great for one guy and your gear. I don't know how you could possibly sleep two grown guys in this. I have a Marmot 3p Limelight that could be used for two campers and maybe split up the fly and tent between the two bikes.)
    • Kelty Lightyear XP 20 sleeping bag: (This one is discontinued now but any $100-150 bag that you like that compresses well in a stuff sack will do)
    • Klymit Static V insulated inflatable pad: (I've only got one trip under my belt with this item, but much props to all the inmates that touted this pad on ADVrider. It looks like a keeper. I bought a "refurb" from Klymit on Ebay and saved 50% over the cost of a new one. I can't find a damn thing wrong with this one. YMMV.)
    • (optional) Hennessey Ultralite Asym: (I am still experimenting with hammock camping. My feeling is that if temps are lower than 40 F at night, there is no weight or volume advantage to a hammock. I have the Hennessey and it is well made and sleeps great but I don't have an underquilt for cooler weather.)
    • some kind of LED headlamp for hands free light at night (I have an old Princeton Tec but Black Diamond and Petzl will do just as well if not better.)
    • future acquisition: probably a Kermit chair
    That's the salient items that seem to work for me. As mentioned before, don't sweat it. Put together some gear and get outside. You will soon learn what works for you and what doesn't.

    Slim
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  4. Stuskie

    Stuskie Adventurer

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    You got that right. I'm using a 26 year old Timberline tent, a 440 Coleman camp stove (runs on unleaded), a stainless cook pot, Malita one cup coffee strainer, North Face mummy, Thermarest, a change of clothes, a few tool, spare tubes, some grub and I'm off.
    Jim K. likes this.
  5. GB.UK

    GB.UK Long timer

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    I'm putting my kit together for a trip across the Pyrenees next year. My tent is a big Agnes copy by naturehike, 1300grams, neo air mat 550gms, down bag 1400gm, trangia 860gm plus fuel, all this goes into GL coyote and rogue bag. With room for personal stuff. Tools in a Kriega us 5 strapped to the side.
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  6. Lee337

    Lee337 Things & Stuff

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    How do you find the knock off tent?

    I have been looking at the same one...
  7. Jim K.

    Jim K. Long timer

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    +1 on the Timberline. I finally handed my 22 year old Timberline down to my niece. It never let me down in all that time & it's still doing yeoman service for her & her husband & new baby. I think I paid all of $120 for it back in the day.
  8. GB.UK

    GB.UK Long timer

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    Seems very well made, on par with the colemans I've had before, only used it once so far for the HUBB and was fine, will give it another outing next month.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. Stuskie

    Stuskie Adventurer

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    I think I payed about that +/- in 1989. It's been through many down pours and a few snow camps and has always kept me dry. It even made a good backpack tent in it's day but a bit heavy by today's standards.
  10. Sparrowhawk

    Sparrowhawk Long timer

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    That depends on what kinds of groceries you bought.
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  11. michdave

    michdave Been here awhile

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    Bump this thing up!
  12. Siki

    Siki always n00b 2 sth

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    though hammocks offer no weight advantage compared to one man tents, I just prefer its comfort and space for cooking outside or working on bike under tarp when it rains. Besides, there is nothing like having a drink in your hammock looking into countryside with your bike at your side :D

    [​IMG]
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  13. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Love your post Siki!! Dirt bikes n hammocks, perfect combination!!

    You mention that hammocks and tents are comparable weight, this is correct usually. However this usually does not include the sleeping pad which is a huge variable. The fact is one needs to compare complete sleep systems. A tent requires a pad, cot or something else to sleep on top of in the tent. The hammock does not IF using a bottom quilt. This allows the complete hammock system to pack a lot smaller than a tent even with a lightweight pad.

    Case in point. Here is my double layer Warbonnet Blackbird, not the smallest nor lightest system as its double layer.

    [​IMG]

    and here packed into a stuff sack. Included in the stuff sack is the tarp, both upper and under quilts, all the straps, webbing and suspension. Basically everything needed for me to set-up and sleep come rain or shine.

    [​IMG]

    measures 9 inches tall


    [​IMG]

    by 9 inches wide.

    Now here in comparison is my Army issue Gore-Tex bivy sack and the smallest pad they make, the Thermarest Neo-Air, size small.


    [​IMG]

    This obviously packs smaller than a tent and fly, even a 1 man.

    Here it is in another compression sack.

    [​IMG]

    At a little over 8 inches long, roughly an inch shorter than my complete hammock set-up.

    [​IMG]

    Width is 6 1/2 inches wide versus the nine inches wide hammock.

    Keep in mind the above does not even include the top quilt that i use as it is being used by a friend this week. If the down quilt was included the measurements would be even closer. So by giving up the comfort of the hammock, tarp and quilts in exchange for a bare bones Bivy sack with no zippers or hoops and a size small Thermorest Neo Air pad I would save roughly 1 inch in length and 2 1/2 inches in width. It would be even closer again with the top quilt packed. Now imagine if instead of the Goretex Bivy we used a 1 man tent and tent fly!!! Add poles and you get the idea. In all fairness I believe a hammock set-up when using quilts packs significantly smaller than a tent and pad.

    I've always try to keep my packing to a minimum and I have found the hammocks save me greatly in packed space. I can set-up my hammock, tarp and quilts in about 8 minutes.

    The caveat is you have to be able to utilize a hammock as they are a different breed of fish and take a bit of learning and figuring out compared to a tent and pad which is familiar to most people.

    Best of luck with whatever you choose.
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  14. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    You have a nice light compact system . That looks great for that nice green forest you picture it in.

    But .... unfortunately for me...I often ride in the desert .... difficult to "utilize " a hammock in those conditions.


    Enjoy

    Scott
  15. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    I appreciate the effort you went through to post this, but your premise is flawed as a blanket statement because you started with your gear. If you started again and specifically chose the smallest and lightest gear available then you would see that there is no appreciable difference in bulk or weight between a hammock or tent.

    Nemo Hornet 1P tent - 24 ounces (pack size 19" x 4")
    Klymit Ultralight sleeping pad - 9.1 ounces (2.5" x 5" )
    Sea To Summit Spark SP 1 sleeping bag - 12 ounces (12" x 4")
    Total weight - 45.1 ounces
    Total volume - 414 (cubic inches)


    Your hammock volume (it approximates a cylinder 9" dia x 10" long) - 640 (cubic inches)
    Your hammock weight > 45 ounces...

    BTW, yes I've posted this before so I'm sure it will piss off someone...
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  16. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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  17. Bearded Hooligan

    Bearded Hooligan Moto Addict

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    I prefer my hammock for packability and sleeping, best sleep I've found when camping. However, when things get cold, having an under quilt and blanket adds to the bulk. I broke down and bought a new tent for an upcoming trip since there will be times Ill be camping in the cold, as well as the unknown places of hanging a hammock. I know I can setup my tarp and sleep under it with a sleeping pad, but then I am bringing a pad to sleep on the grand, plus the other things for warmth. For this trip the best choice is a small tent, sleeping pad and sleeping bag. Not my first choice, but like most things is a compromise. Sure wish I could use the hammock everywhere. Ive also run into some places that dont allow hammock camping, didnt stay there and kept moving.
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  18. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    As a hammock camper (warbonnet blackbird and superfly), and a lightweight tent camper when 2 up, not sure I really agree with this.

    I have 2 under quilts and 2 light weight sea to summit and klymit pads. The pads pack and feel as light (without weighing them) as the quilts.

    Tent, fly, poles, bag, pad
    Hammock, fly, quilt, quilt, webbing.

    Both need stakes. I think they are closer than most think.

    My hammock stuff packs smaller, and I carry poles for the hammock.

  19. bronciii

    bronciii Long timer

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    IMG_6914.JPG IMG_6915.JPG IMG_6913.JPG He's mine from a 3 day, multi state ride.

    Wolf man e-12 bags
    Blackbird dbl layer hammock
    Whoopy slings
    Hennessy tarp
    Half a sun shade for bottom pad
    Gsi minimalist pot nested
    eBay stove
    Fuel can
    5 dehydrated meals
    3 cliff bars
    Fork
    Lighter
    Head lamp

    Camp clothes:
    Therma bottoms
    T shirt
    2 pair under panties (gstrings pack down nice)
    2 pairs socks
    Camp shoes
    Beanie
    Frog toggs, jacket only
    Two wash rags/ no towels
    Normal personals( t brush,soap, deodorant,aspirin,etc)

    I carry a camel pack that has an outer pocket that's made to expand for carrying a helmet. It just happens a 12 pack of coors light is about the same size as a helmet :-)
  20. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Haha. Yep, you ain't gonna use a hammock out there for sure. Enjoy the desert. One thing I miss living in Southeast Asia now, are the vast expanses of the deserts I used to have when I lived in California. Long vista views when dropping in from a high ridge-line, you don't get that over here too much.
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