Lets see your lightweight camping setup!!

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by 5 speed, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Naw you're not pissing anyone off, don't worry. I was just posting my findings is all.

    Keep in mind my hammock set-up is faaaaaar from the lightest or most compact out there. If I was to go to the same criteria and look for the ultimate lightweight/most pack-able set-up my hammock mass would be a lot less. For example using a smaller tarp, single layer hammock, shorter hammock etc. You get the idea. I'm not trying to get people to use hammocks as they are an acquired taste for sure. Just posting my experience is all.

    Just as an FYI I tried two Klymit X frame pads for my bivy sack. First night using it in the Sierras in a tent it worked fine. Second night using it in Cambodia in my Bivy sack it punctured. Got to a town and fixed the puncture. Third night another Bivy Sack sleep and it went flat again. When I filled it up and tested in a stream it was another puncture hole, not the repair I had done. Sent it back to Klymit and they gave me another one. Good on them.

    Fourth night on the Klymit pad in Thailand in the Bivy sack. Punctured yet again. Thankfully the ground was not bad.

    [​IMG]


    This time i threw the bloody thing away. Keep in mind the pad was always used inside the bivy sack and not directly on the ground. So out of four nights with a Klymit pad I have punctured three times. Lol!! Now this was two years ago so I sincerely hope Klymit have improved there products Lol.

    Best of luck in whatever everybody sleeps in.

    [​IMG]
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  2. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    But there is a hammock advantage, in warm weather.

    A hammock in warm weather negates the need for a sleeping pad, and you can shed the underquilt.

    In cold weather it is a draw, harder to stay warm in a hammock, and harder to be comfortable and not have wet stuff in a tent.

    been there, done both many many times...




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  3. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    FTB!

    I groan outloud when I deal with my self inflating mats...

    I bought a new one a couple of months ago, it will be for sale soon.
    packs pretty large..hard to roll up, not as comfy as they advertize, and always the risk of a hole in the middle of the night.

    the middle of the night hole has happened to me more than once with previous pads.

    I was really trying to follow the crowd, it just doesn't work for me.. back to the hang.
  4. GB.UK

    GB.UK Long timer

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    Really interesting stuff gentlemen, in the uk it's really hard to wild camp and even harder to find somewhere to hang a hammock. I use a thermorest neo pad which I lent to my daughter who then punctured it but didn't tell me when I went to use it but the repair kit they sent with it worked very well and it's still holding a year down the road.
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  5. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I looked up the gear you listed... light and small for sure.

    Sea to Summit bag....Given the light duty specs of the sleeping bag and comparing it to a hammock camper. The hammock wouldn't need an underquilt in the same conditions/temp. So FTB's post will be closer to the gear you listed.
    Klymit pad.... No way I would own that, that's the silliest design in a pad i've ever seen, and I'm a klymit fan with 2 Static V pads. Still small packed but double the inertia ultralight size weight.
    Nemo tent... nice little tent but i'd prefer a 2p for solo.

    Another thing to consider with the hammock/tarp is the ability to sit in the hammock, lounge back and swing (so one could go without bringing a chair) and cook in rain while under the tarp. So there's that.

    The ability to have tent stuff pack smaller than a hammock may be possible, but not for me given the comfort level I want. It's not all about pack size, but it's certainly a large consideration.


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  6. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    This is response to the last several posts - you all make good points and just to be clear I'm not suggesting tents are a better option. In fact I have a bivy sack, 3 tents and two hammocks and I find hammocks so much more comfortable and convenient that I will never sleep in a tent again unless I have to. I can honestly say that I sleep better in my hammock than I do in my bed at home.
  7. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    I posted somewhere here before, but changed a couple things - really happy with this base set-up for UL moto-camping, bicycle touring and backpacking and therefore have [finally] stopped searching/trying to upgrade. Shelter, bed, kitchen, and water processing are ~5 lbs/10L.

    [​IMG]

    Fits in a fanny pack for an UL overnighter.

    [​IMG]

    Wish I could get comfortable in a hammock - for me it's easier finding trees than flat ground. I have an HH Asym UL, but find it larger, heavier, and more fiddly, while being less protective/comfortable.... for me.

    This rig has also converted me from fixed- floor/door tents to floorless 'mids'. The modular inner tent and footprint are variable between traditional double-walled and giant vestibules (for kitchen, latrine, leave boots on, etc) offering some important advantages over traditional tents or hammocks in really lousy weather like wind-swept rain.
  8. PeteAndersson

    PeteAndersson Swede

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    Nice setup!

    Can you post some info on how you erect this and what kind of poles you use? How does it perform in windy and rainy conditions?

    It looks like a modern version of what we had in the army, it was called "Ensamma Vargen" (translates to "Lone Wolf" in english), back in the day it was considered light weight and simplistic. My modern two man single layer tent is lighter and better than that but yours looks promising.
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  9. frozenpoet

    frozenpoet Valks rule, clowns drool

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    I like my tent setup (BA copper spur ul2, static V insulated pad, enlighted equipment quilt), I love my hammock...but I'm still working on the setup. I like the idea of he Nube system, but it's a bit heavy. The lighter version isn't out yet, neither are particularly cheap. You can stack hammocks in the thing so that's cool http://www.sierramadreresearch.com/hammock-shelters

    While still not the lightest system, for a solo RTW type trip I would bring the clark mark2. Can easily be used as either a tent/bivey or hammock. https://www.junglehammock.com/product/mark_2_bivy_ground_tent_camping_hammock/

    I do backpack, but I'm not worried about being ultra light. At this point in my life I'd rather carry a little more weight and be comfortable at camp, granted I only hike around 5 miles if I'm camping.
  10. Snapper

    Snapper Long timer

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    Thanks!

    You should be able to see the 3-section pole in the packed item pix, but I usually use a trekking pole or fallen branch.

    For set-up you stake 3 primary corners, insert pole, and then stake the door guyline which erects it. Then stake last 2 points, lay tyvek footprint and the inner nest clips in on at the 4 corners and peak. I personally just clip 2 corners and leave the inner nest collapsed until I'm ready to sleep - it gives me more working room and I now find bug nets do a better job at keeping me out, then the bugs out.

    With 6 stakes and 'bottom heavy' pyramid shape, it's great in the wind. You can vary pitch height and so anchor right to ground on a storm pitch on all sides except door (face downwind). Floorless mids are popular with winter campers, partially due to ability to shed snow and wind.

    Floorless mids are best/driest tents I've used in rain - innards can be set-up/take-down while dry under the cover of the fly. With the nest collapsed, and footprint folded back you have giant vestibule to cook in, work on gear under cover from wind-blown rain, and you can even dig a cathole latrine to take a morning dump in before you pack-up and leave (not establish campsites of course).

    I also have the highly rated BA Fly Creek UL2 - almost twice the pack size/weight, yet with less room when it counts - don't like it. SixMoonDesigns and MoutntainLaurelDesigns make good floorless mids.
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  11. SFC_Ren

    SFC_Ren Been here awhile

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    What brand and model of tents and how much for each one?
  12. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Haha, I feel your pain. The Klymit X frame punctured on me three times out of four.

    Where I live hammocks work well as tree's are everywhere. However some people cannot adapt to sleeping in a hammock even if tree's abound. The choice is an individuals when it comes to what they want to sleep in. Like you, I am much more comfortable sleeping in a hammock than on the ground.

    Sleeping in the hammock is much more comfortable for me than sleeping in a tent or bivy sack.

    Where the tent shines is in it's ability to store gear. Buy a tent big enough and simply throw your gear inside. Job done.

    The hammock requires you to either hang it underneath the tarp on the hammock suspension pictured here:


    [​IMG]


    Or just leave it on the ground underneath the hammock. Here I am in a torrential monsoon rain cooking dinner.


    [​IMG]


    All sleep systems are a compromise, pic your poison.
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  13. sprouty115

    sprouty115 Long timer Supporter

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    Big Agnes UL1 Fly Creek - $300 (Canadian) Bought in Newfoundland two summers ago when I was on a trip and concerned about sorting out hammock spots. That never turned out to be an issue so I gave it away to my son last summer. Beautiful tent, very well made and very light.
    Mountain Hardware 2P 3-season (forget the model name, but it looks similar to the Skyledge) - $350(?) Used it for rock climbing trips with the wife. Great tent, at least 15yrs old now. Rugged as hell and still leak free.
    Eureka 6P - $150(?) Wife picked it up in some big-box store. Must be 25yrs old now. Used for family camping for 10yrs. About the size and weight of a small child. Hasn't been out of the storage sack in a decade.
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  14. frozenpoet

    frozenpoet Valks rule, clowns drool

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    Stuff like this is why I'm always broke. Trying to convince myself i don't "need" this poncho. I do want/need a poncho for rain gear.
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  15. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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  16. frozenpoet

    frozenpoet Valks rule, clowns drool

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    How did he like it? They have caught my eye.
  17. mouthfulloflake

    mouthfulloflake Not afraid

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    He likes it, but I think that was the first time using it.

    I am not sure that a warbonnet superfly would provide more tarp coverage, but the integrated skeeter net and storage hammock under the hammock are pretty neat.

    it cinches around the hammock straps too makes a pretty good enclosure
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  18. Krazyone44

    Krazyone44 Adventurer

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    Altrider holster
    2 - Ortlieb 22L PD 350
    Touratech 24L Adventure Rack Pack
    All items use 1" stealth buckles so I bought extra for tie down options
    20170315_165037.jpg 20170316_133335.jpg 20170317_183116.jpg
    Muffler side holster is food/stove bag then sleeping bag/pad.
    Other side is electronics bag and then toiletries,first aid kit
    with tools tucked outside dry bag.
    Top bag is tent/tarp, various easily reachable items water,snack, etc. Plus most importantly my Seattle Sombrero for setting up in the rain.
    30 oz MSR fuel bottle is tucked in each lower holster pocket.
    20170318_155906.jpg
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  19. Krazyone44

    Krazyone44 Adventurer

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    Stormy...
    20170318_184647.jpg
    Not so stormy...
    20170316_123045.jpg
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  20. Tom D

    Tom D Been here awhile

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    a hammock forces you to sleep underneath the trees, that is where i have a problem. for starters a heavy fog, much less rain will keep you awake at night with the constant dripping from the branches above. the second and more important thing is my safety, i have seen many branches come down durning storms and one wouldn't have to be very big to cause you a world of hurt.

    thank you, but no thank you to hammocks. i may be less comfortable in a tent, but at least i won't be under a tree.