Let's talk Rekluse RadiusX Auto-Clutch on the KTM 790 ADV

Discussion in 'Parallel World (790/890)' started by TrailTrauma, Oct 22, 2019.

  1. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Chris Parker at Rottweiler absolutely raves about them, citing the various reasons he puts Rekluse auto clutches on all his bikes whether enduro or adventure. Everything from decreased basket notching to rideability in the rougher, technical stuff.

    I've never ridden anything with an auto clutch, and I'm not sure I ever will, but I am still curious to hear from anyone who has ridden a RadiusX in particular to try and establish an overall list of pro & cons.

    Questions coming to mind..

    * Will the 790 even let you start the bike and ride off in gear, or will it sense being in gear and not.
    * Would the RadiusX have an angel gear, which prevents me from parking in gear to keep the bike in place? Thats the thing I love with the heavier bike - parking up or downhill in gear, and getting off to scout etc. Wouldn't a Rekluse auto clutch leave a bike rolling forward to backwards.
    * Continuing to develop more endurance with clutch play on the 790, would the Rekluse interfere in any way, or would it go unnoticed if I rode as I always do, but get me out of a pickle when needed?

    Discuss...
    #1
  2. AdvRonski

    AdvRonski They call me......Ronski

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    From my experience with a RadiusX in my 950, for the most part, it's operation goes unnoticed most of the time. You can use the clutch lever normally, or not. On the 950, it starts to engage just above idle speed, but I don't know what rpm they are using for the 790.
    It will freewheel with the engine off, so parking on any kind of a hill is an issue. They give you a velcro strap to wrap around the front brake lever, but that's not a simple thing to do when the situation gets intense.
    The biggest drawback I have found is the service life of the EXP clutch assembly. The ramps that the weights slide on is aluminum, and I am on my 3rd set of warranty parts. One set only lasted 1500 miles before the weights began to stick. When that happens, it no longer functions as an auto-clutch, but it still allows normal clutch operation. Still, for 800-plus dollars, I expect a longer service life than what I have seen. No Rekluse in the 790 for me.
    #2
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  3. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Thanks Ron. And I guess you can assume that those aluminum bits ended up running through the engine? Not cool..
    #3
  4. chippertheripper

    chippertheripper motorcycle junkie Supporter

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    I had a rekluse in one of my 300’s for a while. While great as an anti stall device, and hole shot grabber (kick and WOT in 2nd would pretty much yield instant takeoff), once the fibers on the ring wore and it started getting sloppy I took it out and never looked back.

    the $60 camel gizmo yields a true 1 finger clutch. If you know how to use it, you’ll never miss an auto clutch, even in the nastiest of terrain.
    #4
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  5. Thumper Dumper

    Thumper Dumper Been here awhile

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    You can’t start the bike in gear with an auto clutch unless you pull the clutch lever in as per normal operation. None of the safety devices are affected by installing a Rekluse.
    The clutch can be used normally so it won’t interfere with your “clutch play”
    Leaving your bike in gear when stopped will allow the bike to free wheel. Definitely a con.
    I’ve had a EXP auto clutch in my 690 for over 5000km and the clutch works perfectly and has never given any problems. Correct free play is essential and needs to be checked frequently (simple procedure before setting off) Initial set up is run in is also essential.
    I love my Rekluse and have one on order for my 790.
    I personally think they do what they claim and are good quality but I guess everyone has their own opinions.
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  6. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second... Super Supporter

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    TT....get a Rekluse later....like years later...

    1) You seem to be enjoying your learning curve....clutch control is essential to getting to the next level..

    2) I used to put them on the 500s....wish I hadn't....as you cant fully ride a 2 stroke with a rekluse...I went rekluse free a few years ago...my ability to control the bike has increased significantly....

    3) They rob power....they increase heat....

    4) They are amazing for people who have injuries or are riding less than challenging terrain...

    5) Chris at Rottweiler has one because he has spent so much time racing baja that now he just goes down there for fun and sun....If he raced a bike again he wouldn't have one....

    6) They cannot be adjusted to operate like a normal clutch....close but nope...there is a reason no pros race with them....

    So.....they are cool....I have had them.....you should get one someday....perhaps master the clutch and then when you are bored....get one
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  7. TrailTrauma

    TrailTrauma Nemophilist

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    Thats the biggest impediment when I consider an auto clutch; my burning desire to just stay the course, and continue developing. CTS and other neuropathies have always been a roadblock, but last ride out was perhaps a rubicon - I had a blast pushing it through a few hundred kms of mixed trail, mud and slab and for the first time in a decade I wasn't forced to pull over to or slow down to regain feeling in my hands. The biggest contributor was seat time on the 790, and the second was stepping back, and leaving rally ThR and trying offroad ThR which took the edge off the neuropathy and allowed me to shed as much tension as possible while continuing to ride. This extended, surprisingly, to being able to ride standing while also releasing pressure on my hands and wrists. Seat time = less tension = significant reductions in peripheral neuropathies. 'Bout bloody time. That last injury still needs to be properly investigated and imaged, and I figured it would necessitate 'aids' sooner on the bike, but this last ride offered me insight into what next season will look like, and it's going to be a real hoot.

    Anyone else reading this living with neuropathies from CTS (carpal tunnel syndrome) etc try these behaviours I employ below. They may make all the difference.

    * Sleep hygiene - get proper rest. Sleep disturbances increase neuropathies (in my case anyway .. like night and day)
    * Purge tension while on the bike. I will pull in the clutch when I find a down grade so I can coast and drop my right arm to shake it out. The left is easier for obvious reasons.
    * Buy a $20 plastic cruise doohicky to use whenever you feel you really need to reset. Cheap medicine.
    * Ride a gear higher, or find any means possible to decrease bar vibes (bar mounts etc as well)
    * Practice becoming 'weightless' on the bike, riding in a neutral position.
    * As above, become clever at anticipating terrain changes, braking or hard accelerating, and shift your body a bit prior to these jolts versus having your arms jerked.
    * If one arm is worse, learn to give it a break by doing your 'hanging on' with the other...whether hard accelerations, or launching back over the rear seat when you're caught by a washout unexpectedly etc.
    * Exploit gripping the seat with your boots, lower thighs and knees.
    * Explore #2 again .. purging tension. I regularly roll my palms up off the grip, then lighten my remaining index finger and thumb and continue whether standing or sitting like this for stretches a thousand times a ride until it's now becoming unconscious. 20 seconds of that will unload enough tension to get me 60%-90% to resetting my neuropathy depending on how far I've let it go or how technical a ride I'm on. Difference between pulling over and being able to ride on.
    * Big one here - don't give in. Don't give up whatever passions you may have. Instead take an inventory, and look for work arounds, and tactics you can employ to get you further with more enjoyment.

    Good luck!
    #7
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  8. coloktmGS

    coloktmGS Been here awhile

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    These are not race bikes...I put one in my 790r and it’s awesome. Trickier to adjust than the hydro clutches on the dirt bikes.

    if you’re learning to race...get a 350 and rip it.
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  9. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second... Super Supporter

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    Who said race?

    TT strikes me as a guy who wants to up his offroad game... lift the front over rocks .... logs etc.... I think he would benefit from waiting... learning to clutch... then decide if he wants to go lazy...
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  10. Some_Dude

    Some_Dude Been here awhile

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    IMO...

    If someone is a bit older and really wants to up their game over the winter, invest in a barbell and a squat rack.
    #10
  11. AdvRonski

    AdvRonski They call me......Ronski

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    This is one of those statements that just sound ignorant. Who gets to decide what is or isn't a race bike? Pretty sure it's not you. I've been racing in various disciplines for almost 50 years, and have seen a lot of bikes that most people would not classify as "race" bikes do very well. That's what I love about motorcycle racing, it's much more about the rider than the bike. I wouldn't hesitate to race my 790 in a cross-country event. We just had an RMEC race in the desert here, where I ran one of the out checks, and I had a great time riding the course afterwards. If someone wants to have another tool to aid there riding, then consider a Rekluse. I have one in my 950 to prevent low-rpm flameouts in tight terrain, but I haven't had that issue with the 790.
    #11
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  12. sideup

    sideup Been here awhile

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    TT : good advice. My problem isn’t CTS it is ulnar nerve compression leaving my ring and little finger on my left hand constantly at a 10% numbness. It is a pain and actually have noticed my left hand and arm getting weaker than my right over the years. I am left handed. About 10 years ago I had a ulnar nerve decompress surgery that did not help at all. I have ridden trials bikes for ever and now I notice when going up big step I must keep my entire hand grip the bar to hold on were as normally I always ride with one finger on the clutch. I am going again to a hand docket or to see if a ulnar nerve relocation surgery my help or is the damage done irreversible. I just don’t want it to continue to get worst. You are right the best thing I have found is to keep active. I ride mountain bikes, dirt bikes and adv bike and I find it always makes the pain less after a ride.
    #12
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  13. ramirin

    ramirin Ready to push

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    I've had rekluse in 250 4T (was there when bought) and 690 (bought myself). Onroad it provides comfort on parking lot, trafic lights etc.. and offroad:

    Pros:
    - You have three hands is bushes if need to use left hand to move twigs
    - You can walk (push) the bike standing on right
    - You can use higher gear in difficult terrain to make bike more stable
    - Helps a lot with not stalling when gassed out
    - It does actually work as promised, you can do wheelie from stand still without touching lever and clutch blibs work as normal
    - Adjustable directly outside clutch slave

    Cons:
    - If you're serious into learning clutch control / technical riding it does change clutch feel in idle / very low rpm. Need to run higher revs for decent feel but why put you're money into system you don't wan't to use.
    - Stalled bike has no gear brake but just rolls like clutch pulled. Can be annoying in steep uphills.
    - Has no motor brake if running idle on downhill, to gain motor brake you need to blib throttle
    - Needs adjusting sometimes, in offroad it's not always obvious when clutch is slipping and when just something else is slipping
    - Cost money

    @TrailTrauma Totally agree with @Nowwhat as I have got the expression that you are enjoying a lot of learning proper bike hadling and really thinking what to do on diffenrent situations. Put rekluse when you wan't to go into woods but not able to stay accurate on the clutch anymore. Don't know your age but we have come to a conclusion in our riding group that everyone below 50 can only mount rekluse on doctors order ;)

    At the moment I have zero rekluse installed and haven't even crossed my mind to get one. Some of my rides I don't even leave home just play with few logs and lumps on my property, try to balance standstill and work on that clutch control.
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  14. CalamariKid

    CalamariKid Been here awhile Supporter

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    I’ve had a Rekluse on 2 bikes so far - a WR450 and my current KTM 500 EXC. I use it because it makes riding more enjoyable for me - ridden for years and years without a Rekluse and don’t have one on my GS - and I’ve ridden that poor GS in places a GS really should not go - so I’m comfortable using a clutch in various terrain, just enjoy ‘cheating’ by using the Rekluse. I don’t see drawbacks to folks using it and it impacting their skills - as long as they continue to use a Rekluse. I used to ride a lot more than I do now - used to be a daily thing, now more a destination thing (go spend a week in Mexico, or a week in the Rockies, etc) so after several hours of technical riding, not having a tapped out left wrist is awesome.

    To me it is sort of like traction control and road racing. Before traction control the guys that got a big edge up seemed to be the guys that had some experience sliding thing around, like Nicky Hayden and Colin Edwards. Once traction control got dialed in, that particular talent was not as valuable. Nice to have, clearly an amazing skill, but technology reduced (not eliminated - reduced) its importance.

    Heck, in another 10 years electric dirt bikes will probably be moving into this segment with much greater penetration and I doubt those will have a clutch at all - every bit of torque you want on tap immediately - just will need to gauge really well how quickly you twist that throttle.

    So for me, with a 790 Adv R on order I’m interested, especially with what I’ve been reading here about folks experiences with stock clutch issues, some feeback on the Reckluse on the 790. Given the experience I’ve had with it on other bikes I expect that it will do just fine.

    Just wish there was a robust way to deal with that lack of engine breaking when the engine is off issue on steep terrain - not an issue until it is.
    #14
  15. kubcat

    kubcat Been here awhile Supporter

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    I run one on my 350 exc, but I am very skeptical of having one on the 790, because of the angel gear phenomenon. When I was first learning to ride with it, I had several scary moments when the bike rolled backwards at an uphill stop - feathering the clutch between grip and slip to keep it stationary until the traffic was clear like I do with a traditional clutch only resulted in a scary backwards roll followed by a panic throttle roll-on which nearly killed me from bursting forward into traffic. That's when I realized "Ah thats what everyone warned me about". Starting out in the middle of a steep rocky trail isn't so much of a problem because its so light, and I can get forward momentum and rpms up pretty quickly. But I am afraid it will be a much different situation on a 475 pound bike. And when you need the tranny engaged to keep it from rolling as you mount up on a steep side hill, I think I would be swearing at the Rekluse then.
    #15