Let's talk sleeping bags

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by BaRRaCuda1974, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. Bikerboy

    Bikerboy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2003
    Oddometer:
    263

    Got the same bag. It’s a great bag. Really recommend it
    #21
  2. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,498
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    I have to second the Costco down quilts. I took one with me on my recent 3 week ride from TN to UT. Damn thing is amazing as a supplement when at higher elevations. It does need a smaller stuff sack though and a small compression bag would be even better.
    #22
  3. Motor7

    Motor7 Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,498
    Location:
    East Tennessee
    #23
    BaRRaCuda1974 and Helibee like this.
  4. scratchypants

    scratchypants Loathes the impolite

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,892
    Location:
    Quebec
    Casually shopping around it seems that the REI (equivalent to MEC here in Canada) branded bags are a hard value to beat.

    As for quilts, I can't imagine not having a hood - even with a hat I'd freeze. I like to cinch up my mummy so that only my nose and maybe one eye is exposed.
    #24
    SmittyBlackstone likes this.
  5. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Oddometer:
    2,568
    Location:
    Boston
    Yup - though on a bike I wonder of the compromise matters. My synthetic 32degree (F) CAN pack down to the size of 2-3 fosters cans, but now I just stuff it in a bigger bag, squeeze it around stuff in my duffle, and then roll down, compress, and strap the duffle. Don't notice any size difference. It's gotten wet a couple of times due to rain, windshift, vent scenarios, and I didn't even notice until I saw it when I woke in the morning.

    I guess a few things come into play: how much care are you willing and really going to give your gear, how important is speed when setting up and tearing down, does a little extra bulk matter, how much cash do you have, will it get wet. The first should be considered: apart from storing stuff loose when I get home, and not overstressing gear in set up/teardown - I don't want to think about it - no special washing, no ointments and magic sprays - I just want to pack it and go, and know it will work. So far so good.
    #25
  6. Manray

    Manray Killing Time

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2011
    Oddometer:
    424
    Location:
    North America
    I like Western Mountaineering down bags. They have a huge selection of bags for different temperature ratings and being down filled, they pack very small for their temperature rating. Still, you can reduce the size further by using a compression dry sac. Here is a SummerLite (32F) with the factory sac compared with the sleeping bag in a small (10L to 3.3 L) compression sac.
    DSCF0038.jpg

    Here is a Badger (15F) with the factory sac compared with the sleeping bag in a large (20L to 6.7L) compression sac.
    DSCF0039.jpg

    The compression dry sac's I'm using are made by Sea to Summit. They are waterproof/breathable and come in various sizes:

    https://seatosummit.com/product-category/dry-storage/compression-dry-sacks/
    #26
  7. theloop

    theloop Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2013
    Oddometer:
    1,266
    Take a look at Under Ground Quils. I bought a 10 defree 800 fill duck down from them and ordered the extra wide 55 inch and 78 inch long and it came in at around $225 with shipping. You can order them with 850 and 950 fill goose down for more money since each quilt is cutom made for you. Also check out their garage sale, sometimes they have some great deals.
    A picture of mine.

    Attached Files:

    #27
  8. MoogLover

    MoogLover Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2014
    Oddometer:
    358
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    #28
  9. RJAMT

    RJAMT Who remembered the winch? Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    Belleville, IL unfortunately
    Since you seem open to quilts I'd like to recommend Jack-R-Better. I have an Old Rag Mountain that I have used comfortably to 15 deg both on a pad in a tent and in a hammock with their Winter Nest under-quilt. I could have gone colder in the hammock.

    The top quilt has a velcro strip at the bottom that seals and forms a foot box when desired and a snap at the top that wraps it around your neck. When both are used it causes the whole quilt to form a cocoon around you that traps heat in. A warm cap is recommended for your head but if its cold I'm wearing that already so no extra gear.

    If it is warmer just open the quilt up and leave it laying flat on however much of your body is needed for comfort.

    The lack of a zipper means that can't break or get stuck. It also makes it much easier to roll out of bed for the bio-break I always seem to require these days.

    I gave up on paying for the insulation on the bottom of a bag that just gets crushed under my body anyway and does nothing for warmth.

    As a bonus, I can keep the quilt wrapped around me while hanging around outside waiting on my coffee to be ready.
    #29
    SmittyBlackstone and Snake Oiler like this.
  10. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,558
    Location:
    below the sea
    I have used a down bag - the same down bag - for over 30 years. Always use a liner to keep it clean. I have a meraklon technical liner that really does add a season or will work on its own when the temps are hot.
    Air it every day while you ablute and again in the evening as soon as you pitch camp. Lets it plump up.
    Mine has been wet and recovered. It was one of the early hydrophobic adopters. It was expensive at the time, seems excellent value 30+ years on.

    Down packs smaller. It is stuffed, not rolled. Gives better thermal regulation - my experience is that syntheric either fails to keep you warm or just keeps getting hotter and hotter until you sweat enough to wake. Down seems to be much better self regulating, hence more comfortable.

    My zip is double ended so you can vent your feet, or open it completely and use it as a quilt. Admitted a tapered quilt.

    As you see from all the responses, the right sleeping bag is very subjective. And the usage and expectations vary so much.
    Having had a few bought and used once, ie all the synthetic ones I bought, I would only buy where I could try. All that sending back malarkey would do my head in.

    And yes, you need a mat or pad.
    #30
  11. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2013
    Oddometer:
    3,896
    Location:
    Швеция
    Foot box, different temperature zones, mummy wrapped, sounds like a sleeping bag to me!


    Same thing can be done with a sleeping bag featuring a full length (or close to it) zipper.


    Agree that zippers can get stuck and they require a bit of care, but it’s not that big of a deal.
    Keep a flask in the sleeping bag for that ”bio break”, no need to leave the tent and it will give extra warmth for some time if you keep it next to your body = win.


    What you pay for is a close wrapping that keeps the warmth better than a blanket...
    But hey, the quilts are cool in a hipster like way :lol3


    An open sleeping bag does this just as well :-)
    #31
  12. beemerphile

    beemerphile Unreconstructed Southerner Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,719
    Location:
    Danielsville, GA USA
  13. calico jack

    calico jack Pro Trigger Puller

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Oddometer:
    124
    Location:
    Middle Georgia
    I got into ultralight backpacking a few years ago and it has dramatically decreased the amount and weight of gear that I now load onto my bike. I tossed my old USMC Issue sleep system and got a ultralight down quilt from Enlightened Equipment. I got the "enigma" model and it has worked flawless for 2 years now. It packs down to the size of a softball weighs in at 15 ounces and is good to 30 degrees. I am a hot sleeper and I have used the enigma down to 20 with thin socks and leggings. It is different from a sleeping bag as it does not have a back to it. I use it in conjunction with a Thermarest z lite SOL and it has worked perfect.
    #33
  14. Snake Oiler

    Snake Oiler If the world didn't suck, we would all fall off

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2016
    Oddometer:
    3,516
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, but living in a toy hauler full-time
    Size does matter for the post above. The less weight means less space. The bike handles much better and less to repack in the morning. But if your sticking to the slap and sleeping in camp grounds who cares. I like to roll at first light and beat the brush back out to the rode. To each their own.

    Too the rest who agrees, I'm enjoying all the different types of sleep system. Also I totally agree on goose down. Our for Father's used citters they know best
    #34
  15. DCrider

    DCrider Live from THE Hill

    Joined:
    May 7, 2008
    Oddometer:
    7,704
    Location:
    Washington, DC
  16. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
    Oddometer:
    4,748
    Location:
    Arlington, Texas
    Nothing works better than goose down that I know of. Used a North Face Gortex Expedition on McKinley(Denali) down to -50f. But you have to have a good closed cell foam ground pad under any bag and an air mat if you want comfort.
    #36
    DCrider and Snake Oiler like this.
  17. RJAMT

    RJAMT Who remembered the winch? Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2014
    Oddometer:
    763
    Location:
    Belleville, IL unfortunately
    I ditched sleeping bags as pretty useless to me but if you prefer one then that's what you should use. Doesn't matter to me either way.

    There are plenty of people who toss and turn too much to keep a quilt covering them. Those people would be better off with a full bag they can't twist out of.

    Quilts aren't for everyone and I never said they were.


    Also my "bio-tool" won't fit into any flask I've ever owned. It needs at least a soda bottle!
    :jack
    #37
  18. beemerphile

    beemerphile Unreconstructed Southerner Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,719
    Location:
    Danielsville, GA USA
    #38
    RJAMT likes this.
  19. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Oddometer:
    2,585
    Location:
    denver
    #39
    DCrider and Snake Oiler like this.
  20. Anders-

    Anders- 690R

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2013
    Oddometer:
    3,896
    Location:
    Швеция

    Soda bottle :rofl
    I guess flask might not be the proper word, but you got the point :lol3

    As for tossing around in bed, that's one of the things I like with a bag, no gap/cold air on the back.
    Also like being able to use the top of the bag like a hoodie, helps to even out the heap of clothes used for pillow.
    #40
    RJAMT likes this.