Let's use motors this time: or KLRs around Nova Scotia

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Retired 18Z, Feb 11, 2019.

  1. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    “Let’s think about using motors on our next trip.”

    A few months after that statement we were on KLRs, cruising around Cape Breton Island on the Cabot Trail.

    Some Backstory

    The summer of 2017, our eldest and I rode mountain bikes from Point State Park in Pittsburgh, PA (USA) to Washington, D.C., riding 336 miles, using the Great Allegheny Passage and the C&O towpath bike trails (probably explains why I find the stock KLR seat perfectly comfortable).


    upload_2019-2-11_14-54-54.png
    As we were planning a trip for 2018, Dan said, “Let’s think about using motors on our next trip.” Dan knew that I longed for an excuse to own a motorcycle again but struggled with finding a way to justify the purchase. Before long we started down the road of comparing notes on what bikes to purchase, what gear we would need, and where we would go.

    We settled on “the pig,” “the tractor,” the venerable (and cheap) KLR 650. Dan had owned a Gen 1, as a college student. I had always seen them as inexpensive do-everything motorcycles. Perfect bikes for rural western Pennsylvania’s mix of dirt and no-stripe black-top roads.

    My last motorcycle was a 1986 GSXR 1100 (new… yes, over 32 years ago). I had ridden the GSXR across Canada on Hwy 1, then down the Pacific Coast highway to Monterey, CA in the summer of 1989. So I was already an experienced Adventure Rider/long distance tourer (I mean, it has an “R” in the name, right?).

    upload_2019-2-11_14-55-21.png

    I was tasked with finding bikes and planning the trip, as Dan’s job had him on the go. Oh, I also had to take and pass my motorcycle permit test and inform Dan’s mother, my darling bride, a redhead, that there were motorcycles to buy and ride for this year’s trip. No pressure.

    Leveraging my prodigious inter-web searching prowess, I found a blue (the fastest color) 2008 with Tusk panniers and racks, Tusk foot pegs, Tusk crash bars, the Eagle Mike subframe and through-bolt upgrade, tall KLR windscreen, $0.22 carb needle mod, Two Brothers’ exhaust, OEM Dunlops, KLR lower dash with aux power plugs and RAM mount on Craig’s List for me at $2,800.00 (US) with just under 11,000 miles on her.

    upload_2019-2-11_14-56-2.png

    Inmate @bohica53 sold us his 2013 (green) with SW Motech crash bars, Tusk panniers and racks, subframe bolt upgrades, Oxford heated grips, Seat Concepts seat, Kenda Big Blocks, LED driving lights, KLR lower dash and Ram mount, for $3,500.00 (US) with around 3000 miles on her for Dan (found it on Fbook Marketplace for those of you interested in shopping for or selling your bikes).

    upload_2019-2-11_14-56-22.png

    I’d like to take a moment and thank Inmate @bohica53. During the conversation about the bike he was intrigued by our intentions. He looked at me and said, “Do you have a helmet?” Well, long pause, I had the barely DOT approved helmet from another son’s foray with a CBR 600. Before you knew it, bohica53 runs me down to his house. He bursts through the door and says, “Honey, I’m giving away a motorcycle helmet!” To which his wife says, “Give him two!” lol I not only walked out of there with a motorcycle helmet, but a motorcycle jacket, a KLR, and a new friend!

    BTW, I did pass my permit test and obviously survived telling my wife what we were up to!

    Before this goes too far, let me help you decide if you want to continue reading:
    • Pineapple does NOT belong on pizza (but feel free to put it on a round, thin, flat bread covered with pizza sauce and cheese, just don’t call it “pizza”).
    • Oil? Yes. Tires or Tyres? Yes. Opinions on which are best? No. Just make sure your bike has them (and in the case of my 2008 KLR, add 1 L of oil every 500 mi/800km. Yes the 685 upgrade is on the list).
    • The best motorcycle is the one you own and ride (unless it’s winter, you can’t ride, cabin fever has set in, you are maintaining your sanity by watching endless hours of YouTube videos, and you’re drooling over the new [insert name of bike here])
    • There’s always one more upgrade, farkle, necessary-gotta-have item to buy for your bike.
    • In 1968, we learned the metric system. I’m still waiting for the USA to convert.
    • The 24 hour clock is the only one that makes sense.
    • WWII fighters are the sexiest airplanes ever flown… But, as a ground pounder, the A-10 Warthog will also have my heart.
    • Scotch should taste of peat and peat smoke and take you back to times when you were with friends around a campfire.
    • Corn, corn syrup and rice (yes, rice. I’m talking to you, the “Dilly dilly” crowd) are cheap ways to add fermentable sugars to malt beverages, but do not belong in beer.
    Still interested? Then read on! Trip Planning is next!
    #1
  2. davide

    davide Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    508
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    Keep it coming and, yes, in Italy (my home country) we execute people who put pineapple on pizza! :D
    #2
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  3. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Oddometer:
    110
    Location:
    Ill-Annoy
    Following this one, as I'm in the early stages of planning a trip to Nova Scotia next year (2020). It'll be two-up with the wife, on the Road King, so it might be a bit different from yours...

    Owned a blue 2008 KLR a few years ago. Had some fun rides on it. Oughta put up a much-delayed RR from them... The blue ones are the fastest (for what that's worth; it's still a KLR). The '08s are also ones that go fastest through a quart of oil.

    Mass-market beer with corn or rice, no. In craft beer it can be OK. What do you think of rye in a beer?
    #3
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  4. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    @ScottFree I haven't had a rye beer that has made me go, "WOW!" but I'm willing to keep trying them. I'm learning to advance my homebrew skills by becoming an assistant brewer at a small 3.5 bbl craft brewery in town. I presume, as summer approaches, we'll make a very light American Pilsner for consumption by those who find malt and hops and yeast too distinctive. This trip should fit with the Road King; we stayed on asphalt the entire time.
    #4
  5. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Trip Planning


    How does one plan a trip when they’ve never really done one like this? I mean, I can pack a ruck sack, pack a canoe, pack a conex, pack the family car, but it’s been 30 years since I packed for a motorcycle trip! A smart person would have taken advice and joined advrider.com and read trip reports… That’s what a smart person would have done. Sigh. I did jump on a bike-specific website and pulled down as much information as I could from them, more on this, later.


    Bike maintenance, how to deal with flats, WHERE’S MY 10mm SOCKET?!


    I began with a steady diet of YouTube videos. Mason’s ADV, EverRide, Ryan at Fort Nine. Search terms KLR, KLR 650, KLR maintenance, KLR upgrades, 5 things you need to know about motorcycle touring, change a flat, etc. I wanted to understand the common failure points of the venerable KLR so I could earn my YouTube Mechanic’s Certification in those repairs (and maybe pick up a Chilton’s along the way).


    What is a day on a KLR like? How far can I ride without hating myself and the days ahead. How do we get from Western Pennsylvania (USA) to Nova Scotia, Canada, before we even start riding around? Can we avoid 4-lane highways? Do we visit Cooperstown, NY? Suarez Family Brewery? The Alchemist Brewery? Epic rides in the White Mountains? Oh, look! Mount Washington is nearby…


    upload_2019-2-12_17-55-29.png


    No matter how I sliced it, this trip was going to be two days by bike before the real trip began and two days back home. Less than ideal when you are thinking about trying to do the whole thing in 10 days!


    With Army friends in Standish, ME, another option soon developed. Haul the bikes to Maine, leave the truck and trailer with Mike & Gretchen, and launch the trip from there. Suddenly four days traveling to and from turned into two! Things were looking up.


    I needed to be sure the bikes could fit on the trailer.


    upload_2019-2-12_17-55-44.png


    (No, we didn’t haul the bikes, one facing front, one facing rear… the hauling pictures are later)


    Once fitting on the trailer was confirmed, the mesh deck on the trailer needed to be improved. Off to YouTube! Boom! Self-tapping metal screws, drive them through the 5/8 pressure treated decking and into the steel structure of the trailer. Home Depot here we come!



    upload_2019-2-12_17-55-54.png

    Add some wheel chocks? Harbor Freight! (Note: for whatever reason, I did not use through bolts to secure the wheel chocks. Mistake. The wood screws on one wheel chock pulled out on the way home. Through bolts with nylock nuts and washers are this summer’s upgrade to the trailer.)


    Again, back to YouTube to determine the critical tools and parts. Do I use the Tusk aluminum panniers as seating, when in camp (saves the weight/space of a camp chair)? How many lbs of gear do I need to take? When you are hiking or biking, every ounce is critical. Now that I have a 650 cc engine to help, how much of a luxury upgrade do I go for? How will all this weight impact handling?


    Bike to Bike communications. My first “on a budget” mistake… I bought the Sena SMH 10 comm. unit. It was great, solo. I could hear directions from my phone, make phone calls, etc. Everything I needed. It was great as a bike to bike comm. unit. What it didn’t do well at was bike to bike coms AND being able to hear navigation directions from my phone. Dan got the Sena 20s EVO comm. unit. He could hear navigation instructions AND carry on bike to bike conversations. The shortcomings of the Sena SMH 10 meant that I would spend most of the trip riding trail.


    What to do in Nova Scotia?


    First, why? Why Nova Scotia?

    · It sounded cool.

    · It wasn’t in the USA (after all, this is an Adventure ride)

    · It had some good reports

    · Great seafood

    · Stunning scenery

    · Good breweries

    · A single malt whiskey distillery

    · It gave us an excuse to visit Mike and Gretchen, and other U.S. Army friends in New England!


    Once we settled on Nova Scotia, now what to do there?


    We looked at the Bay of Fundy. Depending on when we left, we could join in the Bay of Fundy Adventure Rally: https://www.fundyadventurerally.com/ As we were somewhat flying by the seat of our pants, we could stop at Hopewell Rocks in New Brunswick or shoot for Joggins Fossil cliffs in Nova Scotia. It’s also pretty easy to find information on the tides, so you can plan when you want to get somewhere with beach access: http://bayoffundytourism.com/worlds-highest-tides/times/


    Cape Breton Island, the Cabot Trail and the Cape Breton Highlands National Park were “must rides.”


    If Cape Breton was a must ride, then the Glennora Distillery was also on the list.


    Could we make Meat Cove?


    Did you know that there are cable ferries along the coast?


    Halifax?


    Eating at the Shore Club in Hubbards?


    Peggy’s Cove?


    And so on. Every morning I would dive into information about Nova Scotia, pour over YouTube and other online resources. Plan, unplan, re-plan routes around the province. Do we go down the west side? Down the east side? Do we take the ferry there? Take the ferry back?


    I jumped onto the bike-specific website, scrolled down to the Canada section, opened up the Nova Scotia tab and posted that we would be traveling to Nova Scotia in September and would love to meet up with fellow riders. Inmate @gemini3 responded with an invitation to camp in his back yard and use his shower and clothes washer! WIN! Dartmouth, NS became an instant stop on the tour.


    After a few shake down rides, Dan and I were ready to pack everything up, load the truck, load the bikes on the trailer, and head to Maine!


    I will stop short of giving out an exhaustive packing list. We had enough stuff, without looking like a pair of vagabonds. No frills. I rode in old black jungle boots and a pair of Carharts with @bohica53 s gifted jacket and helmet. I picked up an inexpensive rain suit (Nelson Rigg). The rest of the kit, most of you have or know or can find reasonably similar lists here or elsewhere.
    #5
    Joris van O and boulet_boulet like this.
  6. B10Dave

    B10Dave Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Oddometer:
    1,818
    Location:
    Kingsmill Corner Ont.
    Looks like a good ride report coming. In!! It's Cape Breton by the way.No N. Waiting for more....Dave
    #6
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  7. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    @B1Dave thanks! Spelling will never be a strong suit of mine. I'll go back and edit the report (and try to do better, next time).
    #7
    B10Dave likes this.
  8. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    #8
  9. BSTT

    BSTT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    131
    Location:
    Braunschweig, Germany
    Hey yes I'm in, cause I like your ideas about pizza and beer.:lol3
    Yes and of course I'm interested if I can remember some places. Some years ago me and the family started from Boston to PEI and back.
    #9
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  10. Tukata

    Tukata ADV Demo Rider

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,736
    Location:
    Canton, GA
    Make sure to stay in Chetticamp at least 1 day.
    My dad and I made a trip up from Georgia and we spent several days in Nova Scotia.

    Update to follow
    #10
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  11. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 1 Western PA to Maine


    I’ve heard critics talk about the first days of trip reports being about riding the slab. I’ve heard critics talk about how trailering your bike is wimping out. So while you two camps get your critical hats on, the rest of us are going to enjoy the trip.


    Hurricane, now Tropical Storm Gordon, was on the move. He was dumping buckets of rain as we loaded the bikes on the trailer.


    upload_2019-2-14_17-24-34.png


    Gitu and Rusty are not enthused about our leaving…


    Technique:

    There are a lot of ways to tie down bikes. I know. I watched about 30 YouTube videos on how to strap down a bike. Because the KLR without a fork brace doesn’t have a way to avoid cranking on the suspension, we had to just go with what anchor points were readily available. A possible upgrade would be tiedown hooks bolted onto the bikes, but that’s for another time.


    We avoided the hooks on the straps all together. We passed the hook around the upper fork, then passed the free-running end of the strap through the eye of the hook, cinching down on the upper fork, creating a somewhat “soft loop” touching the bikes. On the ratchet side, we used a heavy duty carabiner passed through the same loop that the hook for the ratchet sits in. This way, no matter how bumpy the ride is, the bikes are secured by the straps.


    This was the weather radar view the whole way to Maine:


    upload_2019-2-14_17-24-51.png

    The view of the bikes didn’t change much, either:




    upload_2019-2-14_17-25-16.png


    But the company was great (he has a far better selection of music than I do, the old man driving the truck).



    upload_2019-2-14_17-25-42.png



    We eventually made it to Mike and Gretchen’s little cabin in the woods where we were greeted by a Maine Lobster meal washed down with some quality suds, and warm dry beds to sleep off the “puppy belly” from such a wonderful meal.


    I can’t stress enough how nice it was to have friends along the way. From Mike and Gretchen to Squeak (you’ll meet him later), to inmate @gemini3 and the help of inmate @bohica53. All these people contributed to making lasting memories on this trip.
    #11
    snglfin and B10Dave like this.
  12. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 2 On the road to Brewer, ME

    Standish to Brewer, Maine (USA) is not much of a ride. Jump on I-95 and “Bobs your uncle.” We wanted to avoid interstate highway travel as much as possible so we hit the “avoid highways” button in Google maps and took a route that ran us right through the state capital, Augusta.

    upload_2019-2-15_8-39-23.png

    We were hoping to “Rest Over Night” (RON) in Acadia National Park, then ride to the top of Cadillac Mountain to see the first rays of sunshine touch U.S. soil at sunrise #merica. Unfortunately Tropical Storm Gordan’s remnants were clouding the skies giving us zero chance of such a unique sky-show. We exercised our alternate plan and spent the night in Brewer, ME with an old U.S. Army buddy of mine.

    Gordon. Yes, Tropical Storm Gordon and the absolute dunking in water he’d given the bikes…

    After pulling the bikes off the trailer, parking the trailer and the Taco (Toyota Tacoma), we gathered our gear and prepared to go… only to find that my 2008 blue (fastest) KLR would not start. Battery power was good, it would turn over, but wouldn’t start.

    I don’t suppose you can have an Adventure Bike “adventure” without some form of emergency procedure, open heart surgery, or a flat. In our case, it was swap spark plugs (no effect), pull the carb, and wash the carb in Seafoam fuel treatment, then reassemble.

    upload_2019-2-15_8-39-36.png

    2008 KLRs were recalled for a wiring harness issue. Could all of the moisture be causing an electrical problem? This bike was so new-to-me, I had no idea if it had the recall service performed. What I do know is giving the carb a thorough cleaning and replacing it was enough to have her start right up and we were soon ready to go!

    upload_2019-2-15_8-39-58.png

    Note to those concerned… I did swap out the deck shoes and blue jeans before riding.

    Here’s a brief video of this day’s ride:

    The roads were well kept, smooth asphalt, very nice. We got to enjoy rural Maine and see many older homes and farms along the way. Dan, having spent a lot of time in the Pacific North West, really enjoyed the scenery.

    The ride finished at the home of an old U.S. Army buddy of mine, “Squeak.” Squeak and I served together at Ft. Bragg and in Bad Toelz, Germany (yes, I can say “Squirrel’s tail” in perfect Bayrisch). Squeak had steak, great company, frosty beverages and a warm place to sleep for us.

    upload_2019-2-15_8-40-31.png
    #12
    boulet_boulet likes this.
  13. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    @Tukata we stopped for breakfast in Cheticamp... to fuel up before hitting the Cape Breton Highlands NP and the twisties of the Cabot Trail!
    #13
  14. klogger

    klogger John Sawyer

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    83
    Location:
    R.I. coast
    keep it coming, and thanks.
    #14
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  15. RJ44

    RJ44 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2015
    Oddometer:
    205
    Location:
    Thunder Bay, Ontario
    Excellent stuff so far. Looking forward to more of the trip.

    Rob
    #15
    Retired 18Z likes this.
  16. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 3 (Part 1 of 3) Brewer, ME (USA) to Calais, ME


    A planning note… Our window to take this trip straddled the end of “high tourist season.” When we left Maine, it was still considered “high season” but by the time we’d made it all the way around Nova Scotia, to Yarmouth, high season was over. By avoiding the peak of tourist season, we enjoyed much lighter traffic on the roads, a much smoother ride on the Cabot Trail, and saved $50 US ea. on the ferry ride back to Portland. I had received advice to ride Nova Scotia counter (or anti) clockwise, that way one would always be on the ocean side of the road. The timing of our trip dictated that we’d ride around Nova Scotia clockwise. To be frank, I could not tell that there was a lot to be gained by being in the other lane, 3m closer to the ocean.



    upload_2019-2-16_7-43-53.png

    We got up early the next morning, eager to reach Canada. After a warm sendoff by Squeak, we headed up the road for a fantastic breakfast at the Eagle’s Nest Restaurant:



    upload_2019-2-16_7-44-14.png


    upload_2019-2-16_7-44-31.png

    The breakfast stop was good as traffic was heading into Brewer when we hit the road. By the time breakfast was over, the roads had cleared, the sun was a little higher, and it was time to ride!


    Route 9 between Brewer and Calais, Maine was just gorgeous! Amazingly fun and fast. Quaint little towns, classic architecture, trees, mountains, vistas… Well worth the ride!


    Lesson learned… We were maxing out the storage on the GoPros by leaving them on so much. I was also maxing out the storage on my laptop when downloading the uncut GoPro footage. Eventually, I had to truncate and ditch some of the uncut footage from the first few days of riding in order to keep filming and storing. When we hit Dartmouth/Cole Harbor, NS we went straight to a Target and bought an external drive where I could off-load all the video files. Recommendation: If you are going to film a multi-day adventure, then bring a storage device large enough to hold all your files.

    Attached Files:

    #16
  17. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 3 (Part 2 of 3) Calais, ME (USA) to Joggins, NS (Canada)

    The border crossing was cordial and welcoming. Just be sure to shut down your motorcycle so you can talk to the border agent.

    We’d set our sights on Joggins, NS. This meant we would be pounding pavement to get there. We developed a habit of riding until we’d reached 100 mi (160 km), then look for a likely place to stop, refuel, and stretch our legs… maybe grab a bite of jerky or a meal. The bikes could have gone further between fill-ups, but we felt it was just a good “marker” for a break and to avoid rider fatigue.

    At one such stop, in New Brunswick, we ran into a guy who entertained us with his stories of moose hunting. MOOSE! Ah, yes. We were in moose country and would need to thoughtfully consider what to do if we encountered one on the road (fortunately that never happened).

    The highway speeds, wind noise, and the 2 Brothers exhaust made conversation along the way a bit difficult. It was, for all intents and purposes, hammers down, 70 mph, push to Joggins. As our path turned more easterly, toward Nova Scotia and around the top of the Bay of Fundy, the region became more agrarian. Farm land opened up.

    In Sackville we hit our first Tim Horton’s!

    upload_2019-2-16_7-46-38.png

    Shortly after our mandatory Tim Horton’s stop, we reached Nova Scotia!

    upload_2019-2-16_7-46-56.png

    We finally pulled off the slab in Amherst, NS. Right across from the exit ramp, on the way to Joggins is a MANDATORY STOP FOR ALL KLRs, Fundy Bay Tractors! The place was closed, but we couldn’t resist taking a “bike-ie.” I am convinced that every KLR traveling to Joggins, NS must stop here and take a picture. As a side note, the folks at Fundy Bay Tractors are really nice. I contacted them after the trip and ordered a couple of their ball caps and got their logo made into stickers for our own Kawasaki-tractors.

    upload_2019-2-16_7-47-12.png

    The ride from Amherst to Joggins was such a relief, after all that slab. Winding farm roads. Slower pace. Good asphalt. Great scenery.

    Here’s a video of this day’s trip:
    #17
    boulet_boulet likes this.
  18. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 3 (Part 3 of 3)

    Our RON site for the evening was the Crab Apple Inn B&B. Small quaint rooms, great hostess, wonderful breakfast.

    upload_2019-2-16_7-49-25.png

    We had fish and chips at a nearby diner for dinner. A wonderful sunset. The end of a good day’s ride.

    upload_2019-2-16_7-49-41.png

    Attached Files:

    #18
    B10Dave and RJ44 like this.
  19. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 4 (Part 1 of 3) Joggins to Margaree Forks

    One of the Bay of Fundy trip planning considerations was the state of the tide when you get a chance to actually visit the Bay. Seeing the bay at high tide is, well, like looking at a bay. Low tide is the jaw dropping part. We knew low tide was around 8:30 am, so that motivated us to be packed and ready to leave, once breakfast at the B&B was over.

    During breakfast, our hostess let us in on a local secret… The locals do not go to the Joggins Fossil Cliffs official welcome center to find fossils. While that’s nice and there are cool displays, if you want to go fossil hunting you need to go where the tourists do not. Just a little further south along the bay is an access road that takes you right down to the bay and a treasure trove of fossils. Our hostess used the term “Fill your boots!” in reference to fossil hunting there. She remarked of stories her Grandfather told of coal mining under the bay where the miners would blast their way through forests of petrified wood.

    upload_2019-2-17_7-42-30.png

    After a short visit to the official Joggins Fossil Cliffs Welcome Center, we took our hostess’ suggestion and went down the bay a little way and spent an enjoyable half-hour walking along the bay floor, looking for and finding all variety of fossils. No megalodon teeth, though. Next time!

    upload_2019-2-17_7-42-51.png

    upload_2019-2-17_7-43-9.png

    A bit too large for the back of the KLR! Yes, those are 15 yr. old black U.S. Army Jungle Boots (I got real motorcycle boots for Christmas. Thanks, Honey.).

    upload_2019-2-17_7-43-31.png

    Perhaps the oldest fossil we found! lol
    #19
    B10Dave likes this.
  20. Retired 18Z

    Retired 18Z Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    Clarion, PA
    Day 4 (Part 2 of 3) Joggins to Margaree Forks


    For today’s ride we focused on: 1) avoiding highways; and 2) sticking to the coastline as much as possible. The “stretch goal” for the end of the ride, was Meat Cove. I had received strong positive referrals for the camp ground there, the quality of the facilities, and the warmth of the welcome. Another goal for the visit to Cape Breton Island, was the Glenora Distillery and, of course, the Cabot Trail.

    upload_2019-2-17_7-58-24.png

    upload_2019-2-17_7-45-52.png

    Curling isn’t quite a club sport in Western Pennsylvania, USA.


    The countryside of rural Nova Scotia is beautiful. Gently rolling terrain, swooping curves, quality asphalt. Along the coast, the scenery was equally as beautiful and perhaps even more distracting. Kudos to the folks in Tetamagouche, about 10 km outside of town they started posting small, blue, information signs of a mug of beer with “Brewery 10 km”… That made the determination on where we were going to stop for lunch pretty easy.


    The Tetamagouche brewery is that. A brewery. We managed to hit there when the food truck was present so we were able to take advantage of some really nice craft beer and some great food truck food for lunch.


    upload_2019-2-17_7-46-11.png



    upload_2019-2-17_7-46-25.png
    #20
    B10Dave likes this.