Lone Rider Motorcycle

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Lone.Rider, Feb 24, 2018.

  1. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    New 2 Person ADV Tent custom made for Adventure Riders

    Check out all the custom biker features here:
    https://www.lonerider-motorcycle.com/products/adventure-motorcycle-tent

    Let me know your must-have feature for motorcycle tents, we can build them into the tent

    Cheers!

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    World Map design

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    ADVTent Without maps

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    North America Map


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    Roadside breakdown hazard carry bag


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    S.O.S ground mat

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    North and South America on one side


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    World Map Europe, Africa, Asia and AUS and NZ on the other side
    #1
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  2. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    I have been lurking on AdvRider.com since June 2010 but a pretty low forum Odometer… As I said, I'm a lurker.

    A little info about me (Andrew) and why I design and engineer MotoArmor products that are designed for the most insane and challenging situations.

    In 2009, I had no idea what adventure riding was

    I thought I was “Adventure riding”

    Two mates and I bought and rode 5 horses and rode across the Patagonian wild with zero riding experience, and a few basic skills to survive in the wild for long periods of time.

    But you learn… Fast

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    Photo was taken a few months into the trip in the wilderness. http://patagonia-adventures.tumblr.com/

    After spending over 2 months cut off from the world, living off the land in Patagonia Argentina. We hadn't seen any news or even talked to our loved ones in over 2 months.

    We went “bush”.

    We survived, living in the wild. The environment was beautiful but brutal.

    The day we made it back to a small town sitting at a gas station waiting for a ride, happy to have made it but sad that it was the end...

    A massive motorbike rode in and parked next to me loaded with gear.

    Eyes wide opened, I asked him what he was doing?

    “I’m overlanding” this dude from Zurich, Switzerland said...

    You what? I asked as he explained to me he was traveling around South America on a motorbike.

    Drooling, my brain buzzing thinking about the next adventure, it was a done deal.

    Instantly hooked

    Time to upgrade from 1 horsepower...

    A few months later, license and bike in hand, a tent strapped to the back and I off looking for the remotest places in the world…

    The last trip was circumnavigating Africa.

    From Switzerland to Cape Town via the west coast of Africa, then back up the east coast back to Europe. 16 months of the craziest roads, people, and counties in the world…

    And I put the bike, gear, and protection to the test.

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    Images from http://facebook.com/wheelieAdventurous

    Most of it got smashed to pieces! But it’s understandable with the amount of daily beating it received. The gear and bike is there to be used right?

    Combined, Fred (Founder of Lone Rider) and I have been on the road, on our bikes constantly traveling the world for over 14 years. All that experience is going into every product, every design, breathing adventure, breathing quality.

    It has to, it needs to do its job under the worlds harshest conditions, it can't fail us either.

    That's who we are, that's why we are making adventure riding equipment because we live it and need it ourselves.

    But that's the short story... More interesting to me is why you adventure ride? Or why you started adventure riding? Natural transition down from a hog, or natural transition up from a dirtbike?


    ahh, in the next post, I will explain how we are making products to possibly help save bikers lives…

    Cheers

    Andrew
    #2
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  3. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    I hope it's going to save bikers lives...

    Below is an example on why and how we design the best possible adventure riding products, that will not only save your wallet from replacing damaged bike parts, but possibly your health too.

    Being seen is one of the most important aspects to reduce accidents, if they don't see you coming, they can and will probably will pull out in front of you.

    So why do so many adventure riders cover lights up with a grill pattern when it can reduce visibility?

    Looks cool?

    Instagram story poll, with 400 votes:
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    After driving through so many countries that do not have the infrastructure to properly train drivers, or they are just blind... I got to thinking how could we fix it.

    Spoiler alert… It’s not possible...

    But, you can prevent a lot...

    Also the answer is simple, DON'T cover the light! Or at least make it better?

    So, in 2016 after driving the west coast of Africa on a motorbike, I added an orange filter to my LED headlight in Cape Town.

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    I felt the difference immediately, cars took notice and kept eye contact with the bike.

    I was amazed but how simple but effective the filter worked

    But when riding at night there were shadows cast from the grill. and the light got so dirty it was not effective enough

    This is what I came up with after so many months of testing in Africa over 2016/2017

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    Soooo Andrew, that still doesn't help when you are riding at night?

    “I still get shadow patterns on the road at night” I hear you say...

    That's the same problem I had, so it was fixed it by making the faceplate detachable and the option to fold it down for night riding.

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    Phases of being open

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    You can have clear, grill or even both. It doesn't matter what type of riding you do because this is a modular system, you can configure the light protection as you need.

    And be seen at the same time…

    Grill for offroad riding, fold it down for clear at night or in states where covering the light is illegal.


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    Here is the concept taken over for KTM and the BMW 750-850 GS

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    And for the KTM 1290 Adventure

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    That's just a small example of how we develop products. The problems are our own too.

    What do you think? Would you use it and what kind of setup would suit you the best?

    I’d love to know what you think, and if we can add your ideas and feedback into the product.

    The design of the grill is not finished yet, the fold down part, I’ll post a few designs soon to see what you think

    Cheers

    Andrew
    #3
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  4. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    #4
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  5. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    #5
  6. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    #6
  7. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Launched a new headlight guard. Heaps of features added, taken form hundreds of ADV riders around the world.

    3 headlight protection styles in one: Clear, grill and a combo of both for night riding

    Full Kit Grill + Clear on webshop: https://bit.ly/2K8vPBF
    Grill System on webshop: http://bit.ly/2K81ALh
    Clear System on webshop: http://bit.ly/2K7BYhr



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    Folded down for when you ride at night, it stops the grill from casting shadows on the road reducing visibility.

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    More details on the webshop:

    Full Kit Grill + Clear on webshop: https://bit.ly/2K8vPBF
    Grill System on webshop: http://bit.ly/2K81ALh
    Clear System on webshop: http://bit.ly/2K7BYhr

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    Making it safer to ride at night.
    ✔️ Two layer protection
    ✔️ Foldable grill system
    ✔️ Polycarbonate night riding protection
    The ultimate headlight guard with 15 new features!

    #7
  8. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Slipping off pegs sux, and it can be quite painful too.

    The other week 6 mates and I where enduro riding in the Cambodian Jungle just near Angkor Wat, there was a stream or small river up ahead I hit it with speed... as you do.

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    My left boot got basically water blasted off the peg, lost control drowned the bike and cleared the rest of the river and hit the other side with a grinding thud... as you do.

    Chicks dig bruises right?

    Yer sure, I was going way way to fast... but damn, you know when you gun it and just gotta push the limits? well, it will always be like that. Plus, these boys were Baja 1000 finishers and it's good to ride with people better than you to up your game.

    So I got thinking and thought to design a better peg than on my Yamaha WR450 F, and use it for ADV bikes too.

    SO...

    First developed this concept:

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    The standard?

    But I got feedback from friends and other riders that the pins come out and even with glue they eventually come loose with heat and hits.

    Replacing parts on the road in remote places is the last thing you want to do ADV riding, you could possibly find the parts but if you are normally on a time schedule, nobody got time for that. Try replacing them in the DRC Congo...

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    Plus, this design has no wow factor, what makes it better than other footpegs on the market? Whats it USP? When making something, its gotta be better and stand out from the crowd.

    Plus, it's not tough enough for the ADV market...

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    So that design was scrapped, the foot peg needs to be fail-safe.

    You have five connection points to the bike, two hands, two feet and ya but...

    That's not much real estate considering those points have to control a few hundred pounds of bike and equipment, gravity, bike power, dodging blind meathead drivers or boulders and washouts in the outback.

    So, this is the next concept, the design has replaceable grips and made from cast metals:


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    The body is made from one piece high-end solid anodized aluminum. The spikes from cast metal and have a rubber buffer for fit. This rubber buffer could be thickened to reduce vibration.

    A good thing is you can change out the spikes when they wear or replace them with more aggressive ones or a different design to suit your riding.

    So...

    I ride every day and know what works for me but that's confined by my type of bike, gear, riding conditions, and skill level to name a few variables. That is no way to develop a product that is world class and makes a better and safer riding experience for thousands.

    That's why hearing from riders is the only way to develop awesomeness. They know what works, send the products for them to test and push to the limits and work beneficiary together.

    As always I asked and go A LOT of response, I never knew the foot peg topic was so hot:


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    IF you wanna see the feedback: https://www.instagram.com/p/BgREBMsB6Xt/?taken-by=loneridergear

    What do you think of the new design? Getting a lot of feedback already but there is so much to pack into one design to make the "ultimate footpeg" it may turn into something that does everything ok, but nothing good.

    Got to prioritize what is important for ADV riders, in what order and hit it like that for sure.

    I'll make a Google questionnaire and post it here if you wanna have your say on what is the best features for an ADV footpeg. I'll post the results here too.

    (I'll do that and post the link here in a few days when my internet speed is faster, traveling in 3rd world countries suck for a reliable connection sometimes)

    Love to know what you think is the most important features that are really needed, and filter out what is personal preference or just because of influenced brand orientated fanboys. Let me know here or better on the above Instagram post.

    Cheers

    Andrew
    #8
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  9. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Howzit @HeidiHo , sounds good. These ones above are for the 1200 GS because I have the bike and can test it. But you bring up a good point about compatibility. Was thinking to make a special plate that is like an adaptor that can be replaced and customized to fit for different bikes including the V-Strom's.

    So if you have a vStorm and a DR you can just by the adaptor and not a whole new set. The footpeg the same, but the connection different.

    I have seen a few companies do it already but haven't had a good look yet, maybe something like this:

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    The red is the peg..

    Dalton highway would be the best place to test them for sure, that road can be hard out... It's on my bucket list.

    Got to get the design down, prototypes made up and some sent out to riders ASAP.

    Cheers Andrew!


    #9
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  10. Drunk_Uncle

    Drunk_Uncle Long timer

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    I really like the red pegs,but in blue. I could test them for you on the Denali, Dalton, and Top of the World Highways for you. I have an 04 1150GS and I believe the pegs mount the same all the way up to Wet Head! I would also love them lowered if possible. Shoot me a PM or email bradley847@aol.com.
    #10
  11. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    @Drunk_Uncle Good to know! Lowering seams to be important, especially on the bigger bikes. Make sure to sign up here and we will send out an email when I have parts to test: https://lonerider-motorcycle.com/pages/motoarmor-register

    #11
  12. Drunk_Uncle

    Drunk_Uncle Long timer

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    Done.
    #12
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  13. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Got the new headlight guard on the bike to test.

    Got to make sure it fits, looks good and complements the design of the bike. The wave pattern is coming alone strong by personly I think its missing something. Needs to be more edgy and aggressive...

    The air intakes of the boxer has a honeycomb pattern, this may be good to bring over into the headlight guard design tieing it all in.

    If you have an opinion, I'm all ears...

    Cheers,

    Andrew


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    #13
  14. AmuleK

    AmuleK On a bike, no one asks "are we there yet?"

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    It's interesting that one row of waves doesn't connect to the next row. It would make the guard weaker.

    Why not connect each row like an elongated honeycomb? That would improve strength tremendously, but would still look modern and let more light to pass through compared to your other design.
    #14
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  15. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Hey @AmuleK I took it away to test it, below is a CAD image of it when its linked as you recommend, also on point with the elongated honeycomb, I was trying something a little different but it's not really working. I too think honeycomb is better, and it is the same as the air intake for the 1200 GS. Appreciate the input! Thanks man -Andrew

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    #15
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  16. AmuleK

    AmuleK On a bike, no one asks "are we there yet?"

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    I agree and like that design better. I see what you mean by matching the pattern on the air intake. I've never looked at it closely.

    BTW, I'm the same person as bountiful_adv on Instagram.
    #16
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  17. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    @AmuleK Here are some other designs getting tested. Thoughts?

    I will be manufacturing these soon, just got to get the grill pattern design down and we are good to go.

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    #17
  18. AmuleK

    AmuleK On a bike, no one asks "are we there yet?"

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    Since you ask, I'll share my opinion.

    In this business of adv accessories, there are tier one and tier two providers. Tier one includes Touratech, Altrider and Wunderlich etc. Tier two includes all those pursuing them by making cheaper products. You often see them (tier 2) selling on eBay. Tier one headlight guards look to be designed as part of the bike, following the cues and lines of the bike's engineering. Cheaper manufacturer's products don't have that feel. Their headlight, radiator and other guards appear like they are thrown together with existing resources. Think chicken wire pattern, or repeating squares or triangles etc..

    Out of the last designs you posted, I like the Option A of the first group, even better than the elongated honeycomb. I'd buy that in a second. It's not a repeating pattern and looks like it's an extension of the form + function we get with 30 plus years of thorough GS engineering out of Munich. It looks like an improvement over the Touratech design, which in my opinion, is the best looking guard in current production.

    Also, I really like the orange filter overlay idea for the LED portion. Great for being seen.

    Attached Files:

    #18
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  19. Lone.Rider

    Lone.Rider Lone Rider

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    Ahh @AmuleK I would have to completely agree with you. (A) is my favorite too. I have the Touratech headlight guard and driven 75'000 km on my GSA and know the patterns it casts all too well. It does have the "adventure look" but still complements the bike. Design is hard, the old "that's so easy to make, I could make it in 10 min" line is true, but if you had to develop it from scratch and solve all the problems it takes months... I'm also sure, many people buy for the looks over function, so from a design point of view, the design and function must complement each other so well there is no compromise between them, super hard but more than achievable.

    For sure I will position the product in the Tier one level, it has taken so long to get this far. Again, thanks for the feedback, appreciate!
    #19
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  20. GB

    GB . Administrator Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    Everything looks like Tier 1 products to my eyes. Very sharp looking and distinctive, not a copycat of what's already out there.

    Does the 1200GS headlight guard have both a clear cover and the honeycomb cover?
    #20