1. Adventure Rider Print Magazine!
    We're doing a print magazine this November - 128 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase a copy for $9. Limited copies still available.
    Dismiss Notice

Long term KLX250S review

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by bmwhd, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. MaverickAus

    MaverickAus Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,219
    Location:
    Heaven on Earth
    Man if you find pavement with pegs check for road rash :lol3
  2. MaverickAus

    MaverickAus Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,219
    Location:
    Heaven on Earth
    easy to make it a 300 :wink:
  3. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,163
    Location:
    Japan
    Very responsive in corners and the suspesion soaks up any bumps with no problem. It's a very different feel (for me) having a street bike with dirt suspension; major thumbs-up! I really want to get her unplugged as soon as possible though.
  4. okiswede81

    okiswede81 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12
    Location:
    Lynnwood, WA
    Good to hear, I must say that you have way more options than we do over here when it comes to aftermarket stuff.

    Whatever you do to your bike, let us know, I would like to hear what the Japanese aftermarket stuff is like.
  5. tremor38

    tremor38 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,163
    Location:
    Japan
    One of the items I've been checking-out, and probably will buy is the "comfy seat" made by a company named Daytona here in Japan. It's available in 'low' and 'high' versions. I'll probably opt for the low version because of my 32" inseam. Customer reviews all say that the seat doesn't wear-out your butt in one hour like the stock one does. Apparently the foam is firmer, but distributes the weight more evenly.
  6. backwoods

    backwoods Field & Stream

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Maine
    Hi all, I 'm new to this site and I want to first start by saying the information here is incredible. This is the best bike forum I've ever read.
    I'm looking to buy a KLX250s or ? this week. I'm 6'3, 215lbs. I have several questions.

    Will the bike be big enough for me in the size dept?

    I need more dirt bike than road, but is the bike good on the road?
    Sometimes I will have travel 60 miles on the highway at 65 mph.(not interstate).

    Can I buy a bigger fuel tank?

    Will I need a bigger skid plate/engine gaurd?

    Any opinions or info is greatly appreciated.

    Backwoods.
  7. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    I think you are the only one that can answer that. There are plenty of tall people that like this bike just fine, but it really depends on what you like.

    It will get you there, but not the most comfortably. This bike wants to be in the dirt and trails. It will tolerate roads to get you to and from the trails. Once on the trails, you'll have a great time in the dire. I also use mine to commute to work, but that's only 15 miles each way, no interstate. Works fine for that.

    Yes.

    Not mandatory of course, but I'd recommend it. It's a relatively small investment compared with the expensive components it protects.
  8. backwoods

    backwoods Field & Stream

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Maine
    Thanks for the reply nobrakes. I guess what highway distance I'm prepared to ride will be trial & error for me.

    Any ideal of top end speed and rpm?

    Can someone tell me where to order the skid plate and bigger fuel tank with part #'s.

    Will the KLR650 windshield fit the klx or be made to fit for my 60 mile highway journey too and from that I make twice a year ?

    backwoods
  9. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    This weekend I performed the 300cc upgrade on my KLX250S. It was two evenings total, taking my time. I had one major snafu, totally my fault. During the final stages of reassembly I accidently jabbed my radiator when cutting the zip-tie from my timing chain and cut a small slice for a pretty good leak. So my testing of the 300cc cylinder was delayed another day while I embarked on Radiator Repair 101.

    After that little diversion I was back on track. It fired up on the first crank. I broke in the cylinder using 3 heat cycles / cool downs of about 1/2 hour each, doing run-ups and and back down 1st through 3rd gear and 1/2 throttle on the first followed by 1st through 4th gear and 3/4 throttle on the 2nd and 3rd cycles. Then I changed the oil and filter and today took it for a longer test ride hitting some light trails and some road.

    If you are wondering what the 300cc feels like, the closest thing I can think of would be the gearing change mod that many have done. It actually feels better than that, but the analogy should give you and idea of what to expect if you've already done a gearing change. I changed my gearing a while back from the stock 14/42 to 14/49. While I loved what it did to the bike, I did not like losing the high gear - basically this change took away sixth gear and was like riding the bike stock but never shifting into sixth gear. Of course, you gained a gear down low which was great, but losing the equivalent of sixth was unacceptable to me so I reverted back to stock gearing.

    The 300cc kit feels similar to the way the bike did after that gearing change, except I'm running stock gearing so I don't lose anything on the top gear. There are a few hills around here and I can accelerate up them in sixth gear now where before I'd generally need to gear down to fifth. There is more power across the whole RPM range which is expected. Most noticable is the increase in torque across the range, low RPM as well as high. Definitely it is making more horsepower, how much is anyone's guess. I'd love to dyno it - perhaps I'll see if I can find somewhere to do that.

    The front end comes up much more easily now, even with stock gearing. If I sit back a little and pull up a bit on the handlebars and blip the throttle when the bike is around 2500 to 3000 RPM, the front will pop right up with a little tug. I don't have a lot of practice at wheelies, so I'm not brave enough to keep it up and ride it out so I let it drop back down. Those that have gearing mods would most likely find it _very_ easy to lift the front end.

    Regarding the torque all around - it did something today that it has never done. Mind you it was raining and the roads were a bit slick, also I have the harder compound Kenda 270's on which don't have the best road traction. However, I was in sixth gear going about 45 MPH up a hill and I figured I'd see how well it accelerated up the incline. I was about halfway up when I laid on the throttle. The rear wheel broke traction with the road! I know the road conditions had a good bit to do with it, but it has still never happened until this upgrade.

    So to summarize - more power across the board, from first through sixth. Front end lofts much easier. It feels similar to what you might have felt when moving to higher gearing ratio - somewhere along the lines of 13/45 or 14/49'ish, but with the stock gearing. This is not a perfect analogy because it also feels snappier similar to the jetting / pipe mods. Basically it's sort've like all the mods I've done to date (airbox, jetting, pipe) times 2. So think about how your bike felt the first time after doing all those mods and call that 1 notch. The 300cc kit will notch it up again.

    I hope this helps anyone considering this upgrade get a feel for what it does. To me this was definitely worth the money and effort, especially since I didn't care for the higher gearing mod since it tended to reduce the roadability for me by losing sixth gear, which is why I run the stock gearing.

    Cheers,
    -Brian
  10. Nobiman

    Nobiman Orange... the color of insanity.

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    732
    Location:
    La la land... republik of Kalifornia.
    Nice write up Brian. :clap So no major issue's with installing the 300 parts? They really just simply bolt on?

    Thanks, Randy.
  11. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    They do. Here are the parts:

    [​IMG]

    Here's the new cylinder and piston in place. And the infamous zip tie.

    [​IMG]

    From the outside you can't tell anything was even done - everything's on the inside.
  12. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Just to add to that a little bit, installation was straight-forward - no surprises. There's a good bit a disassembly though, but you don't have to open the crankcase - just the top end. You need to remove all the plastics, seat, fuel tank, drain the oil, drain the coolant, disconnect the coolant hoses, remove the valve cover, cam bracket, cam tensioner, cam shafts. After all that, there are 4 8mm cylinder head bolts that you'll need to muscle off - they are tight - 46 Nm torque each. Then it's ready to come off - cylinder head first, then cylinder - use a plastic mallot to loosen them up. Once those are off, stuff some rags into the engine opening so you don't drop any parts in there, then remove the piston snap rings, pull the piston pin, then remove the old piston itself. Get some good cleaner and clean off any gasket material. I actually quite a bit of time cleaning the mating surfaces and prepping the new cylinder - cleaning off all the heavy gooey factory oils. Use a _very_ light coat of 10W40 on the inside of the new cylinder. Then reassemble in reverse.

    Again, no surprises, a little tedious, but if you've done this stuff before you know what to expect. This was my first time this far into an engine. I'd adjusted my valves before so the farthest I'd been was the valve cover. This was a good bit more, but not harder, just more of it.
  13. Nobiman

    Nobiman Orange... the color of insanity.

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    732
    Location:
    La la land... republik of Kalifornia.
    Sweet, Thanks dude!

    Randy.
  14. MaverickAus

    MaverickAus Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,219
    Location:
    Heaven on Earth
    Yes ... and in case you missed it he did a 6th gear burnout !!!!!! :eek1
    albeit on a wet road ... but I'm still impressed ... hmmm where the hell did I put my 300 kit :evil
  15. backwoods

    backwoods Field & Stream

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Maine
    Well I purchased the KLX250s today at my local dealer. All I can tell you is I love it. I think I will need to do some mods though.

    A guy who bought the only other one the dealer sold was at the shop when I picked it up. He told me he drilled out the 1st baffle with a 1/2" bit in the muffler when he got his home and noticed a little change in sound and thought it reved out a little more. He said he has ordered a KDX snorkel air box and that's going to be it other than a jet change. Does any of this sound right. I will drill out my 1st baffle but I'm worried about screwing up the back pressure. This guy said there were other baffles still in it and the last one shouldn't change anything. I want to keep it as stock as I can but I don't mind obtaining all the free mods.

    Thanks,
    backwoods
  16. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Yes, that sounds right, backwoods. However, I wouldn't do those mods until you re-jet the carb to run a little richer. The stock bike is running pretty lean and with restricted air intake already to meet EPA restrictions everywhere. When you open up the exhaust and the airbox but don't rejet, you will be running leaner still which can damage your head in extreme cases.

    Here's the stuff you need from Kawasaki (or an online parts source
    like BikeBandit.com):

    1) N1TC needle (pre-'05 KLX300 49-state needle which is Kawi part
    number 16009-1912)

    2) Needle clip (92037-1401). Put this in slot 2 down from the top of
    the needle

    3) Needle collar (92143-1667) - Goes on top of the clip

    4) #125 Main Jet (92063-1069)

    5) Airbox snorkel (14073-1577) high flow unit

    Look back through this thread for photos and other instructions such as uncapping the pilot screw and turning it out 2.5 turns, drilling the slide vent hold to 7/64th's, etc.

    I recommend you do all these at the same time. It makes a world of difference for this bike. Whatever you do, I'd definitely be careful about doing anything that will make the bike run leaner such as installing the high flow snorkel without doing the above carburetor adjustments, though.
  17. Alleycat

    Alleycat "03"

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    39
    Location:
    Midland Ont. Canada "A"
    I finally heard from Muzzy, it was sent out on Friday after two weeks of waiting( back order:eek1 ). So this week:evil . I was just reading Brians write up on the 300cc kit that sounds like a really big power increase congradulations on the new bike. I also travel in sixth gear alot, is there a site I could look more into this upgrade ? or if you dont mind.. how much the kit is worth.

    Matt
  18. nobrakes

    nobrakes Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,369
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Thanks, Alleycat. The kit was around $470 buying the parts from Ron Ayers. You might have luck with e-bay and save some money - dealers in Australia seem to be sweetening the deal on the new KLX250S by including the 300 kit with the sale, so there are bound to be several that show up on e-bay. I've seen a few there, but as luck would have it I was always a bit too late to bid. If you buy the parts individually, you need the following:

    From Ron Ayers: http://www.ronayers.com/

    1 x 11005-1983 - CYLINDER-ENGINE Price: $309.93
    1 x 13002-1109 - PIN-PISTON Price: $9.63
    1 x 13008-1071 - RING-SET-PISTON,STD Price: $36.66
    2 x 92033-1054 - RING-SNAP Price: $0.84
    1 x 11004-1314 - GASKET-HEAD Price: $37.31
    1 x 11060-1740 - GASKET,CYLINDER BASE Price: $5.16
    1 x 13001-1463 - PISTON-ENGINE Price: $62.64

    Total: $463.03

    I had my parts within a few days, but they are pretty close by where I live.

    Your best reference is the service manual. Definitely don't attempt this without the service manual as it has all the torque specs for those ever important bolts like those of the cylinder head, cam bracket, etc, etc. I did post some more photos over here, though, if you are interested:

    http://www.kawasakiforums.com/m_49288/tm.htm

    -Brian
  19. Crilly

    Crilly Long timer Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,194
    Location:
    Wi
    :D My tires have developed green line on them. (1500 miles). Do they mean anything?
  20. backwoods

    backwoods Field & Stream

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    16
    Location:
    Maine
    Thanks nobrakes. I appreciate the replies and info supplied. I'm looking at doing the re jet#125, baffle drill out, snorkel kit, and needle, needle clip & needle collar. How much of a noticable diffrence?

    Do I also need to drill out the air box if I buy the snorkel kit? I'm pretty green with this stuff and it will be done by an after hours cowie mechanic.

    backwoods