Lost on the way to the End of the World

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by El Explorador, Aug 6, 2012.

  1. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    Yo, El Ex! Awesome update! Sorry to hear your back was giving you some problems, but hope all's well with it now. Close call with that cam chain! A blown engine would be no fun at all! Don't sell yourself short when it comes to trading stories with other adventurers you meet on your journey - you have done some amazing thing! Page one! Thanks for the update....the photos are strikingly beautiful. Best wishes, as always!
  2. poolman

    poolman Gnarly Poolside Adv. Supporter

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    Love the photos, no complaints here about rez.

    What is the time differential between your ride report and real time?

    Thanks,

    .
  3. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    Hey Blader, thanks for the wishes, good to see you still along for the ride... and Poolman, cheers, I personally dont like scrolling through a photo that won{t fit on screen but it is nice to see the detail the good old DSLR can catch. As for time differential, haha, check out the first post... Chronologically, the next one is Halloween 2012...
  4. Trip Hammer

    Trip Hammer It's not the years, it's the mileage Supporter

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    :lol3
    Great update, El! Been following since the beginning. You've got a great writing style with the pics to match. So, not sure I understand the last response. ..you're still in Mexico or just really behind on the report? :photogSorry. .I'm a little dense today :lol2
  5. cyberdos

    cyberdos Easy Bonus Loop ♦♦

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    Hey Blake. :wave
    Since you're using Flickr here's what you do.

    once you're on the picture you want to post go to the bottom right hand corner and select this (circled in red):

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    That will bring up this popup below. Before copying the link, click on the drop down and select a smaller image size.

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    Always great to see you post again. :beer
  6. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    Hey Capn. yeah I'm rrrreeeeeeeaaaaaaallllllllllyyyyyyyy behind... but let me tell you, it only gets better. Man, it gets so fucking good I kept going for three years on this ostensibly six month sojourn. Much appreciate the props amigo, more to come!
    Trip Hammer likes this.
  7. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    Gracias señor Dos! Always good to hear from you, that camelback is going strong but the ladyfriend's beagles _finally_ made me retire the bladder. High sierra, would buy again at that price hahahaha.
  8. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    Coastal Roads.

    On a motorcycle those are are special words that hold the promise of a journey with no need for final destination.

    Everyone said I absolutely have to go to Sayulita, so of course I crossed it off my list. But the enchanting roads hemmed in by lush tropical jungle put me in a mood to stop for any excuse and I decide to slow down and check it out. The little town is as cute as its name, tourism has made it a comfortable little cove and the rocky coastline cliffs limit the real estate enough that it hasn't been able to grow out of control. A local tells me that there are almost empty beaches a few kilometers to the south, so I go exploring down the highway in search of hidden treasure.

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    I follow a mostly dry riverbed to a beach and am not disappointed – I'm the only one I can see.
    Still, there are signs that the coastal rush has made it here. An opulent beachfront home caps the North tip of the beach, and a large building that can only be a resort hotel, barely a mirage at the south end. But in between is nothing but sand and sea, I walk along the line where they meet no different than if I had come out of the jungle a hundred years ago.

    The sand is hard packed and it occurs to me I might be able to ride it...

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    A smile wide as the horizon says it all, the salty air whips and curls through my hair, the bike deftly maneuvering along the narrow margin of rideable sand packed between the soggy sea and soft beach. A couple of waves come up high and remind me not to get too confident as I struggle to keep Lost from being swamped. At the South end I discover construction competing with the hardy beach vines. Flowers adorn the concrete carcass and invite me to come take a closer look. Poking around I actually discover a few almost finished rooms with mattresses and everything.

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    I'm tempted to consider it a temporary home, but mistrust the thick moldy smell. This vagabond has health standards. From the roof I can see that there is a large finished hotel attached, complete with security – who looks right at me and starts running.

    This is always my favorite part.

    I've been planning for the fastest way out the whole way in. A hop here, a slide there, and I have the bike started before security is anything more than bootsteps echoing closer through the cavernous abandonment. People who say they're too old to play tag are just too old for life in general.

    Roaring back to the riverbed leading to the highway, the strip of rideable beachway is narrowed and treacherous, I barely make it back and realize I got lucky the guard prompted my exodus before the tide came too far to make leaving an option.

    I head back to Sayulita for some food where I meet Eduardo, the closest to a gourmet taco purveyor I've met. Fresh and creative salsas, delicious and varied fillings... the prices aren't the cheapest but I don't regret it; I'll even it out tomorrow. He introduces me to Damien and Eve, a couple from San Francisco who are about to open their resto-bar here to join the expat community. They're cool people and convince me that tomorrow, Halloween, is the day to be in Sayulita. It's a love-hate thing I've got going with these gringified towns. On the one hand, they encourage oversterilized and watered down attractions so that tourists of all stripes will enjoy. On the other hand, places like these attract the types who believe that sharing the best parts of their adopted home is a great business model, and you get a cultural incubator of sorts that attracts musicians and artisans who bring their crafts to trade and share. Sayulita seems to lean in favour of the latter, and I am intrigued.

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    Every time I see the stereotypical revolutionary icons, I think of the university professor I met in Chihuahua city who expressed her disgust to me against the system of hero-creation that has seen mercenaries and thugs branded as heroes in retrospect to promote nationalism.

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    The next day I buy a big loaf of bread then set to wander and make friends, learning about the gringo invasion, ecstasy-fueled maritime cuddle-puddles, and what it's like having to import real butter. There's marlin tacos... but I've already blown the food budget and decide I can imagine real hard how good they are while eating my bread.

    At night I meet up with Damien and Eve again, and as he's professed to be a rum connoisseur I bust out the big guns – a flask of 23 year old Zacapa Centenario, from my beautiful Guatemala. I'll refill it down there, but there's a long way to go and a tall shot is all I spare. There's still lots of people who need to be introduced to this magnificent hooch. Wandering about I meet up with characters from all over, and park myself a while by a songstress from France with a voice that leaves many frozen midstride, not caring where they were just going. The town is surprisingly lively for its size and the tourists have certainly outdone themselves for being stuck in a beach town – almost everyone is in costume. I'm dressed as a modern Magellan...

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    I meet a girl stealing a horse, and decide to store the chains and saddle she's removing at the place I'm hanging my hammock. Her sense of responsibility goes as far as removing those before setting it “free” on the street. We go play on the beach a while, and sure enough when we get back there are people waiting for her. The horse, or course, returned to its owner as soon as it was left to its own devices. When her friends saw the horse she “borrowed” from the drunken local who was making the poor thing dance for tourists all night, they noticed the missing hardware and assumed the worst. The owner, well he claimed to be worried about her. Fortunately I was the only one who could speak both languages, so my version of events where I rescued his gear and talked her out of riding the horse away goes uncontested and he thanks me while everyone berates the girl for being irresponsible. We share a good laugh when everyone disperses, and I decide Sayulita has been a success; tomorrow I will leave on a high note to see the Day of the Dead celebrations in Janitzio, where supposedly the most elaborate celebrations take place.
  9. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    Just got back stateside and found this installment waiting for me! Thanks, El Ex! Awesome stuff, as always. Just wondering....what to the locals in the now-gringofied towns think of all the change?
  10. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
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    The upside down text says "If you hate Mexicans the why the F**K did you move here!?

    Says it in English... thats a lot of levels to parse. The Gringo is a bad word here, but it gets tossed around pretty casually at all white guys because the taint is there. The locals can't stand a certain class of "buy-it-and-fence-it-off" types, but there are a ton of people who bring in financial stimulus and genuine enthusiasm and love for the culture. It's a little gentrified, to be sure, but people appreciate when someone invests in say, a skate park or water sanitation. As a whole though, the name gringo applies to most white people and that says it all about the general attitude. They may like you, but you need to earn your way out of that title, and even if you do it's ingrained in the culture to a certain degree. It's just a name, but it's attached to a way of thinking that is probably going to last as long as people keep snapping up what was once public beachfront and closing it off to those who didn't come in by private jet.
  11. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer Supporter

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    a lot of San - Diegoins buy land cheap and commute. It must be galling since day in and day out for decades people are dying trying to get across the border to make enough to feed their families.
  12. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    I have heard a few people talk about being "trapped" inside their country (the implication being that not being able to get in the USA leaves you with only worse options to the South).

    Not sure how I feel about it. I think you need to take some responsibility for your community instead of just escaping to where the living is easy. On the other hand, that's a hell of a lot easier to say when you already have North American citizenship and can leave your people to their own devices as the government mostly takes care of those who can't... I think there's also a need for responsibility on the part of anyone investing in a country, but as the above sticker shows there are those who just want to take your ball and leave the game...

    I've seen a lot of successes in Mexico, there's a ton of money moving around. You don't need to leave the country, just make an opportunity. But that can involve lots of risks and it's hard to gamble your money on financial independence when failure means a hungry family because the state doesn't send enough money to social services in your home. Wage-slavery is at least somewhat reliable. What's really fucked up is the piso, the money you have to pay to have a business in certain cities and towns. It's "or else!" insurance sold by gorillas with cold eyes and lots of blood on their hands. Makes a few sadists at the border seem like a small bump in the road by comparison.
  13. RhinoVonHawkrider

    RhinoVonHawkrider Long timer

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    Mas por favor

    Awesome stuff, but I require more of your time typing it up....

    Stay Safe & Keep on Keepin it real
  14. WHYNOWTHEN

    WHYNOWTHEN where are the pedals?

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    closer to Baja
    Thank you for the great RR so far.
    What happened to most of the pics? I can't see them any more.
  15. OnTheWay

    OnTheWay Rock Liu

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    Good stuff!Thanks for taking the time sharing delights on ur way.
  16. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    I require more time, period. I'll take a spare hour if anyone has one lying around.

    I read a short story once that went, "Today, I learned the secret to eternal life. The phone rang, and a voice at the other end asked politely, 'Hello, may I have five minutes of your time?' - I said yes, and the voice said 'thank you,' and hung up"
  17. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    My pleasure mate!
  18. El Explorador

    El Explorador Radical Explorer

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    Location:
    Guatemala City, Guatemala, and going down!
    Hmm that's weird. Refer to www.thevagabondjourney.wordpress.com for backposts, I may have moved some pics and the links went with them?
  19. TonsOfFun

    TonsOfFun Been here awhile

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    Western Oregon
    It's been a year, were are you now?
  20. Blader54

    Blader54 Long timer

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    The time stamp on his first post is 4 years ago. He may have moved on with his life. If so, all the best, El Ex! Thanks for letting us share a bit of your ride!