Metamorphosis: Ugly Goose into Eagle of Zeus

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by sakurama, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. cdndog

    cdndog lurked more,posted less

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    Cool. Of course I had to find out about this over on garage journal on your Mid Century thread but at least I found it. Have at it.
    #41
  2. pennswoodsed

    pennswoodsed lizards,bugs and me

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    Only one of "us" gets that at all :deal
    #42
  3. thejosh

    thejosh Chump

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  4. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    That is about perfect I think save for the stinkbug seat - something the Germans and English seem to like on their "fighters" but otherwise it's a damn close idea to what I'm planning. I like the red too.

    Gregor
    #44
  5. Keith

    Keith Slabbing it

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    I think the MGS-01 has a little less of a stinkbug stance, and it's(...or was) red too. The bodywork is a little boy racer looking though.
    #45
  6. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    The MSG-1 was such a stellar machine. The fact that they never made a street version just tells me that someone was asleep at the wheel there in Mandello del Lario.

    So I'm now trying to double my shop time by working on something small on the bike while I'm waiting to recoat the polyurethane on my cabinets. The garage is too crowded to work on bikes and cabinets so the bikes get rolled out to make room.

    Anyway, today I wanted to tackle that California wheel. I found a scrap of aluminum on ebay (it's the best place to buy material as small scraps that would normally be recycled are sold cheap) and finally had a reason to drag out my giant four jaw chuck.

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    I used the DRO's circle function to make the four holes to hold it to the table and then the five holes for the wheels disk bolt pattern.

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    I then counter sunk the back side of the fixture to flush the heads.

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    And there you go. My rotary table disk fixture.

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    It's got a center hole for a mandrel that drops into the center of the table that gets me to within 20-30 thou...

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    ...but I still use the dial indicator to get me within a few thou.

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    And then I machine off some aluminum. Hopefully I didn't take too much but it will have to wait until the next coat of poly to find out.

    Oh, and I another ebay score.

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    I was thinking I'd make my own rearsets from stainless but I found these broken GSXR ones for super cheap and with the rear master cylinder and I'm very partial to GSXR rearsets (they're on my boxer) because they are always symmetrical, have short perches and are pretty common. I think these are the same as my boxer; Protek. The only thing wrong is the broken mounting plate on the right one (which I'd toss anyway) and the broken peg on the left one (which I'd make new anyway) so they're just perfect. When it gets time to swap components the rear sets that are on the bike will pay for these several times over.

    Gregor
    #46
  7. OConnor

    OConnor Bad juju

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    Ah! Just what I needed. Thanks Keith. :thumb
    #47
  8. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    House work has been frustrating but garage work has been rewarding.

    The stock California wheel is identical to the Lemans wheel save for having the spokes edged with a band sander so they show silver. Sort of a tragic detail that echoes the aesthetic decline of a once great motorcycle company.

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    I used the Fein Multimaster and an air die grinder to soften the edges a little and also reduce the casting marks - you know, while I'm in there.

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    Hard to see in this but the right side is softened and the left is stock. It's a small detail but what the heck.

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    Then I hemmed about what color I should paint it - black or red - and if I should leave the rim silver. I decided to go with the path of less work and just match it to the rear wheel so that I didn't have to also paint the rear. It will also make them easier to sell in the fall when it comes apart for it's real wheels.

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    Sure I've sprayed a lot of two part epoxies and clears but my guns are buried and my paints are still back east. Rustoleum was in the solvents cabinet and in the right color too! Hey, it's all about prep and my prep was good.

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    The only issue I ran into was that the stock rotor bolts could have been a hair shorter - maybe 2-3mm. If I'd had a bottoming tap I'd have used it but all I had was a taper tap so I chased the threads and it went back together.

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    Surprisingly, for going up from a 16" wheel to an 18" wheel the fender only needed to be raised 7mm although it's most likely closer than it was to the tire I actually like that. I turned up some spacers and called it good. This shot is "pre spacers" so don't worry about the fender in the back there - it's even now and a test ride shows no rubbing.

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    And there you have it. The mythically scarce Lemans IV 18" front wheel was no problem to make from the common California front wheel. I took the bike out for a spin and it's certainly slower, the increased trail is rather noticeable but not horrible, and overall it feels much like you'd expect an older Guzzi or Ducati to feel like: a bit more effort to put her down into the corner but more stable when she's there. It's certainly something to think about. As soon as I made a few corners I recalled being at the race track and I wanted to "pit-in" and drop the forks and hike the rear ride height. I think I will drop the forks a bit and see what's gained since there's not much to be done with the back.

    It certainly looks better though!

    Gregor
    #48
  9. Nostaw

    Nostaw n00b

    Joined:
    May 26, 2014
    Oddometer:
    6
    Liking this thread, I've have always wanted a guzzi, one day maybe. Till then I'll just enjoy your project. Thanks for the great thread and top pics. Top shelf work as per usual. (came over from your house thread that I got onto from your KTM thread)
    #49
  10. NorCalslowpoke

    NorCalslowpoke Long timer

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    1,376
    Love the project/skills/attention to detail.

    I've got a somewhat similar Guzzi, but I'm really just a parts changer, with not much vision or, frankly, desire/time to go deep with it.

    Still a couple quick thoughts:

    RE: the 18" wheel

    I have a 17" front on my bastard Tonti fake V7 Sport Guzzi. It turns a bit quicker than the original 18...but Guzzi's are never really "nimble". It, obviously, is a spoked rim. I'm very happy with the handling.

    RE: the chokes.

    You said you were aiming for clean/uncluttered.

    I have the same set up on my 40mm carbs. But frankly, I never use the choke. I just turn the throttle a couple times when cold to get the accel pumps going. Bike starts right up. There are block off kits for the chock spaces IIRC. One of these days I'll remove the chokes and replace with the block off kits.

    Pipes:

    Lots of choices out there, but I like the somewhat muted sound (and look) of my Mistral unpolished stainless pipes. To compare: I had Bub shorties, years ago, and, while fast/light/loud, they gave me headaches..way too loud. I've got a ton of miles on the Mistrals with no maintenance and my hearing is intact.

    I'm sure your project will be stunning whatever you decide.

    Cheers!
    #50
  11. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    below the sea
    Much better balanced!

    You planning on dropping the forks/raising the rear? That worked for me, but I also rewelded the steering a degree or two tighter. Coped with twisties much better.

    The mk111 here came with a longer swing arm, so maybe there were other changes.
    #51
  12. NorCalslowpoke

    NorCalslowpoke Long timer

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    At a quick glance that does look like the longer swing arm (not sure).

    The T-3 swing arm is shorter than some of the later swing arms and handles much better IMHO. I had the longer (and wider) swingarm on my bike for awhile, could not wait to change it back to the shorter one. From my (non expert/non racer) view it handled best with the shorter arm, narrow low profile tire, slightly longer shocks, 17" front rim.

    Guzzi's turn pretty slowly..never twitchy..but all of these make it a bit better.

    cheers
    #52
  13. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    I am thinking about the chokes. I have two options right now that I'm going to explore. One is to go with a BMW left clutch perch and use it's controls and it's integrated choke lever. The other comes from scoring a brake and clutch lever on ebay from a Ducati or some such. This conversion involves going to hydraulic so we'll see how that plays out.

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    It's a decent Brembo lever set so I picked up some lines and fittings from a local supplier and I'm going to remove the linked brakes this weekend and put some bite back into the front end.

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    Across the street from the brake place is an upholstery supply house so I bought some foam, backing and vinyl to try my hand at making a seat cover. I also picked up some fiberglass to make a seat pan as well. I figure once I get the seat pan made I can do the sewing in the evening.

    I thought I'd take the bike off the street for a couple of weeks (dangerous I know) and get the tank repaired. It was suggested that a paintless dent removal guy might be able to fix it. Well, that turned into a can of worms. I ended up talking to about three different ones, two body shops and one hotrod shop. None would touch it save the hotrod shop way out in the country and they said it would be around $8-900 - the cost of a new tank.

    Yeah, that's not going to fly.

    For $900 I can buy all the tools I need to fix it myself and it will probably only take about ten times as long. Meh, I should learn to do it anyway. I'll just wait until winter when the bike is off the road. In the mean time I'll practice my aluminum tig welding.

    While the tank was off and emptied I decided to take apart and clean the petcocks.

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    Ah, so that's why I had no reserve! They were filled with crud.

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    Cleaned in the ultrasonic and then bead blasted they turned out nice.

    Oh, a couple of more things for the bike. For the summer I thought I'd make a simple 2 into 2 shorty system similar to the Bubs but in stainless.

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    I had stainless from my KTM build of the right diameter and just ordered some stainless mega's from Cone Engineering. Nice folks and nice mega's. I'm torn as they make a longer mega that's wider at the ends and I might return these for those. The ending ID on these is the same as the header diameter (1.75") and they seem maybe a little short (12" long) for the bike. Not scientifically but aesthetically.

    And last but not least is the largest headlight I could find which took a long time to figure out. It's from an 84 Suzuki GS1150 and the whole thing is a bit over 9" across. My goal is to accentuate the signature characteristics of the LeMans in an exaggerated fashion so this headlight will balance the monster forks and keep it very meaty and mean.

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    The biggest thing I'm having trouble finding is a 2007 Aprilia Tuono Factory triple clamp set up for the Ohlins. I really don't want to make a triple clamp unless I have to...

    Gregor
    #53
  14. MortimerSickle

    MortimerSickle Semi-Adventurer

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    Uh, oh.
    #54
  15. Y E T I

    Y E T I Unpossible

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    San Diego
    :lurk This is going to be awesome, I can feel it!
    #55
  16. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

    Joined:
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    Thanks for the vote of confidence. Ken may be closer to the truth...


    So one of the things that had been bugging me was the linked brakes. They just had to go.

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    I tore it all out and put on my ebay front brake and then frustrated myself for about an hour trying to bleed the damn thing. I had never had such a hard time trying to get a brake bled. After a while I started wondering if the master was shot so I took it apart and it looked fine but since I had the nice Brembo radial sitting there I thought what the hell - no point saving it now.

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    I put it on and had a firm lever in about 3 minutes. I love those Brembo radial masters - they're the best. The back brake went pretty fast as well. Next up I decided that the faded valve covers could use some love. Not so much love that I was going to polish them but enough to stop looking faded.

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    They were scuffed and primed...

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    Then given three pretty heavy coats of black wrinkle finish and put in a box with a heater on them for the night. A heater or heat lamp is key to getting wrinkle paint to wrinkle.

    With that cooking I looked at the sad old hardware for the valve covers and then dug out some stainless bolts.

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    I tested a few different treatments and went with a 10° tapered head with a back bevel and faced front.

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    And they look great against the new black valve covers. Small detail but a nice one.

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    Today I wanted to ride the bike but also wanted to make some progress on the seat. I picked up a small fiberglass kit and set about taping out the seat on the bike.

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    I used Pledge as my mold release. I also use it to clean bikes, shoes, leathers, cars and anything else I can think of. It's brilliant.

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    Cut the seat pan out of the mess of fiberglass.

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    Glued up some foam onto it and then trimmed it to fit.

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    I also dug out the sewing machine to practice my stitches. I'm not exactly sure how to make the pattern for a seat but I'm willing to give it a try. If it's an abomination I'll have a professional do the job for me but for the summer what the heck.

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    Then I made what turned out to be a crucial error - I washed the bike.

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    I took off to a friends place for the Moto GP party and about halfway there it felt like it lost power. It kept losing power until it just died a 1/2 mile from the party. I have no idea what it is but I'm guessing it's electrical. I'll pick it up tomorrow with my truck and sort through it...

    Gregor
    #56
  17. Scudman

    Scudman Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    699
    Check your float bowls for water
    #57
  18. 16VGTIDave

    16VGTIDave Reaver made me do it...

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    And the battery/charging system. Sounds like what my friends GoldWing did when his alternator failed. That wasn't a fun job, the engine had to come out to replace it! :eek1
    #58
  19. DustyRags

    DustyRags Idiot

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    NooooOOOooooo! I hate that!
    #59
  20. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    It was, as you might expect, a couple of loose wires that came undone in the harness at the kill switch and one of the plug wires came loose from the coil. It's back and running strong again.

    Gregor
    #60