Metamorphosis: Ugly Goose into Eagle of Zeus

Discussion in 'Some Assembly Required' started by sakurama, Apr 24, 2014.

  1. waylongway

    waylongway madmax Supporter

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    Some reason ,That full on hose thing scares the hell out of me on these old bikes. :uhoh

    have not put water to mine in 2 years.

    [​IMG]
    #61
  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I've never really had a use for a kill switch, the ignition key works well for me. I disconnected the kill on mine - one less thing to go wrong.
    There's lots of ways water can get into places it is perhaps not wanted. As it rains a lot here I filled all the connectors with silicone grease. Never ever had a problem.
    Maybe you are looking at the more sophisticated rect/reg units and ignitions available now. It is possible to simplify the wiring down quite a bit.

    I rigged a cable operated choke with an old brit style lever on the handle bar, esentially similar to the BMW one. Even when it was sub zero, the bike would start with just a few flicks of the throttle to work the accelerator pumps. Wouldn't idle for a few hundred yards, but that is obviously no problem - just go faster.

    The tank. I worked with an old school panel beater, he had a range of home made tools for doing work on tanks like yours. "L" shaped with various shapes on the end, from balls to spoons. He would feed the tool in through the filler hole and just rub the dent away. He wouldn't let me try - so either its so easy and he didn't want me in on his secret or it took more skill than was apparent from looking. Anyway just thought it may be easier than hacking holes.

    Keep up the good work.
    #62
  3. Fast_Boy_Slim

    Fast_Boy_Slim Don't call me Wighty

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    Hi Gregor,

    I can't see anything on fleabay UK today but if you need to get a set here and have trouble shipping to the US and I can assist with that let me know. We call them yokes here so make sure you set your search engine up for queens english :D

    Or maybe these?

    http://www.topyokes.com/comfort_kit_+_handlebars/37
    #63
  4. MrPopples

    MrPopples Been here awhile

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    #64
  5. slowpoke69

    slowpoke69 Been here awhile

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    What he said, the tank and seat look sweet together.

    I'm in... late as usual, can't wait to see her done. I just bought my 1st Guzzi on Valentines day, an 06 Breva 1100, I already want an additional one, of course keeping my 1st one.

    From what I'm hearing I need a mid 70's one, I'll have to do some research, I'm a big guy, 6'1", 255, so a little sport bike probably isn't in the cards, maybe an Eldo...HMMM.:wink::wink:

    Any ideas from someone more knowledgable?

    Please proceed.:ear

    #65
  6. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    Those would be perfect. I've emailed them to see if they have a set to fit the Ohlins which I understand to be 1mm smaller at the top tube than the standard RSV. Nice find - thanks!!

    While I was searching around I found a great site that has a couple of parts that would be perfect for any cafe project.

    http://cognitomoto.com/collections/fork-conversion-parts

    They make adjustable offset top clamps (yokes) for GSXR forks and they make a spoked hub that's a direct fit to the same GSXR forks. Very slick. I was considering their top clamps for the offset as it would be nice to have some control over trail as opposed to cutting and rewelding the head tube.

    UPDATE: I just spoke to the Cognito guys and their triples are identical on the bottom and 1mm smaller on the top but they said it would be no problem to make the top 51mm for the Ohlins. I guess that would make a nice setup. They're very helpful too.

    I think down the road I'll convert my boxer to the GSXR forks although I have to say it handles worlds better than the Guzzi - in fact it handled better than my R1200S. Perhaps I'm just used to it but it's a good handling bike so the Guzzi has a high bar to live up to

    Anyway...

    The other day after putting a coat of poly on the kitchen cabinet drawers I thought I'd spend a little time to tackle the seat.

    [​IMG]

    I made a paper pattern...

    [​IMG]

    Cut out the pieces on the vinyl I picked up...

    [​IMG]

    Very carefully sewed the ribbing onto my backer with nice straight lines but the backer pulled to the side...

    [​IMG]

    Got as far as putting the sides on and realized - what the fuck am I doing? Don't I have enough going on in my life that I don't need to learn how to sew up a seat? It's bloody hard to get it smooth and straight and my machine is not for upholstery and simply isn't good for it. On top of that I have to say I don't have the interest to learn this part of building. Not right now and not when I know a good person. My friend Scott used to say, "Don't waste time building something if someone else has already solved it." And that's true for rearsets and certainly for upholstery. Thanks Scott!

    So, with the cover half made I rode out to my upholsterer and showed him my "idea" and made an appointment. He thought I'd done a good job but I told him there was no need - I wanted someone to do it right.

    I'd rather spend my time welding or machining.

    Gregor
    #66
  7. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Sewing is not so hard.... Usual thing, just needs practice. You know how to learn stuff!

    There was a guy on your side of the pond who had a source for car seat type fabric (he made scooter seats)
    with Recaro woven in.
    Just like a Porsche seat.
    And easier to sew too.
    #67
  8. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    I agree Nick, it's not so difficult but I'm at my limit of time (and patience) for learning skills with the house project sucking my energy. This, unlike an exhaust or frame mod, is easy enough to farm out.

    Gregor
    #68
  9. duckman

    duckman co conspirator

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    I am in awe, you have tremendous skill. my ducati needs you.
    #69
  10. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    Thanks Slim for the tip on these top clamps... err, yokes. I got in contact with them right away and they were super helpful. Not only do they have the right clamp for my forks but when I mentioned that they were to be going onto a custom cafe bike they offered to machine them without the ignition mount to make them cleaner and send them unanodized so they can match the look of the vintage Guzzi. Very nice guys and super responsive and helpful.

    Clamp should be here in a few weeks and I'm really looking forward to putting this front end together. It's going to be just perfect with a set of fat bars. Each time I ride my boxer it reconfirms and reinforces that I want this bike to be different and my design will revolve around the concept of a "cafe fighter" - the attitude and comfort of a fighter with the look and style of a cafe bike.

    Don't worry, I promise this will work out and not be the abomination you might imagine. No stink bug seats or darth vader headlights...

    Gregor
    #70
  11. Fast_Boy_Slim

    Fast_Boy_Slim Don't call me Wighty

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    and no painting the entire engine green or pink either ! or knuckle duster mirrors....:D
    #71
  12. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    Yeah, what's up with that? I don't get some of the colors and paint schemes they use on the fighters.

    Anyway, it rained today so I had a limited amount I could do with my kitchen and in between I put a bit of time to the Goose.

    The original megaphones that I ordered from Cone Eng. were just too short (12") and too small looking. I wish I could have heard them as they might be a good choice for the Triumph that's laying in wait but the Guzzi begged for something larger and more aggressive. I exchanged the smaller 12" mega's for more open 17" ones that have a 1.75" ID but a 2.5" outlet so they are very meaty and proportionate. The only thing I didn't like was the mig welded seam on the reverse cone...

    [​IMG]

    Perfectly functional but mig always shouts "cheap assembly line" to me.

    I made a tight fitting cap for the end that fit over my live center on the lathe and then laid down a cloth to cover the ways so sanding grit wouldn't get on them. The first thing I did was just use the lathe to remove the largest amount of the bead.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then I hit it with a file to just round it over a little and then I spun it while sanding it down with successively smaller grits until the weld was gone and the sand papers grain matched the original grain - which was about 320.

    [​IMG]

    Finally I hit it with grey scotchbrite. The trick is being careful to not go too fast across the pipe so the grain stays perfectly straight. Slow and steady.

    [​IMG]

    I may go back and dress them a bit more with my tubular belt sander (it wraps around the tubes) but I am waiting on more grits for that. For now this is a marked improvement. Hopefully this week I'll get the chance to knock out the rest of the exhaust for the bike before the weekend. I'm looking forward to a more booming Guzzi.

    Gregor
    #72
    Z50R likes this.
  13. slowpoke69

    slowpoke69 Been here awhile

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    Marked improvement my arse, they look great, MY Guzzi is no longer on speaking terms, she wants one too!!:lol3:lol3
    #73
  14. russbryant

    russbryant Long timer

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    Gregor,

    I'm following this thread and the one on GJ. Both are fantastic. Quick question and this coming from a guy with an EE background not mechanical. I want to dabble in some metalwork so wonder what you did first...lathe or mill? Would you recommend one over the other to start with?

    Thanks,
    Russ
    Tucson
    #74
  15. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    Thanks Russ!

    Theoretically the mill is more useful. I was once told a mill is the only machine that can make itself or something to that effect. Practically the lathe gets more use and is easier to learn. While a mill can make many round parts with a rotary table or similar it always seems I'm using the lathe far more. I would start, and did start, with a lathe.

    Two books I found extremely helpful are "Machine Shop Essentials" and "Machine Shop Know-How". But more than anything was learning by watching friends and asking a boat load of questions. Lots of good deals out there and the bigger the machine the better the deal and the better the cut. Hobbyists all want small machines that can go in a basement workshop. My little Rockwell mill could easily fetch the same as a Bridgeport and it's half the size but at 1300lbs it's far easier to move than a 2800lb BP. But someday I'll own a Bridgeport...

    Hope that helps.

    Gregor
    #75
  16. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    #76
  17. sakurama

    sakurama on an endless build

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    I'd not seen that sight. Lots of cool stuff.

    I found a set of rearsets that were crashed but only parts I didn't need were hurt so I'm going to use them eventually.



    Right now I want to get the exhaust going. I'm hoping next week I can put a bit of time into that. I'm also excited to get the front end going although that may be more than I should worry about during the summer when I'm supposed to be just riding it.

    Gregor
    #77
  18. Katoom119

    Katoom119 Mmmm....Orange Kool-aid

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    Man I wish I could throw a bunch of random parts on my workbench, snap a picture, and have it look that good.

    :lurk
    #78
  19. russbryant

    russbryant Long timer

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    I seriously doubt they are random. Professionals always use a set stylist :D

    Russ
    Tucson
    #79
  20. Lupin 3rd

    Lupin 3rd Raygun Gothic

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    #80