Mexico Fuel crisis Baja area

Discussion in 'Americas' started by rnrdozer, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. Phlyn' Phil

    Phlyn' Phil Been here awhile

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    I crossed yesterday from El Paso, only one Pemex wo gas, cause it was still under construction. Headed to Durango tomorrow but I see no problems. A few cars w something about gasoline written on rear windshield, no real problems except they act like I should know Spanish? Go figure
    #41
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  2. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Talk louder and slower, they all understand English.
















    :hide
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  3. jdp52

    jdp52 Adventurer

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    Thanks.
    Hope to keep getting the gas info. Good luck

    QUOTE="Phlyn' Phil, post: 31393332, member: 29768"]I crossed yesterday from El Paso, only one Pemex wo gas, cause it was still under construction. Headed to Durango tomorrow but I see no problems. A few cars w something about gasoline written on rear windshield, no real problems except they act like I should know Spanish? Go figure[/QUOTE]
    T
    #43
  4. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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    Glad to hear you're finding fuel (and that they let you in ;) ). We still haven't seen any issues down here in Barra / near Manzanillo, Colima - sounds like Baja may be a bit different.

    Thanks again for the offer to help out with parts.
    josh
    #44
  5. BigDogAdventures

    BigDogAdventures Fart Letter

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    Is that 1 peso increase per litre ????
    BigDog
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  6. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    I think so, that's about and additional 25 cents a gallon.
    #46
  7. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Baja California and Baja California Sur have slightly different PEMEX pricing from each other as well as the mainland. I saw a chart the other day that made it look like the price increases were not the same straight across the board, I'll try to find the link. It may have been a link from Baja Talk on FB.
    #47
  8. Phlyn' Phil

    Phlyn' Phil Been here awhile

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    Hey no problem!

    Made it to sayulita, no problems, except when I missed the one station I needed, and had to ask for a gallon from a jug at the casetta de Cobra, would have ran out on my own, haha.
    Fishing and beers for a couple days....
    #48
  9. snooker

    snooker AttitudeIsEverything

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  10. Par4pogue

    Par4pogue Adventurer

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    Major protests going on in Mexico City the past few days. Took me an hour and a half to get 10 miles yesterday because of closed roads. Good thing for sidewalks.

    Attached Files:

    #50
  11. rnrdozer

    rnrdozer Been here awhile Supporter

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    We've worked our way down to Scorpion Bay and fuel hasn't been a problem at all. The only small delay we had was yesterday in San Ignacio when we got fuel they were unloading a tanker truck and we had to wait 15 min to use the pumps. I did notice there hasn't been premium anywhere.
    #51
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  12. princess jamaica

    princess jamaica OLD DOG-NEW TRICKS

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    Magna $16.59 / litre yesterday in Mulege.They did have premium,didn't catch the price.
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  13. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Any word on diesel?
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  14. rnrdozer

    rnrdozer Been here awhile Supporter

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    So far
    so far it seems there has been diesel at all the stations that sell it.
    #54
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  15. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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    I understood that this was just Pemex being belligerent because of the deregulation and move toward opening up competition to other gas stations. An end of a monopoly, as it were...
    #55
  16. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Your understanding appears to lack knowledge of the Mexican government's ownership of Pemex, and Pemex's position on the world oil market.
    #56
  17. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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    Sorry, do tell.

    That's what my cousins in Ensenada told me. When they came to San Diego to fuel up...

    Is Mexico's oil Industry not being privatized? And isn't Pemex/GoM PO'd?
    #57
  18. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    Pemex is a government owned monopoly that has been spinning portions off. Pemex's position on the world oil market is a long and complicated story and their current problem has a lot to do with long term contracts and changing oil prices as other political issues.

    I think this article from the Washington Post back in April last year may explain the issue a little better than I can:

    ANALYSIS/OPINION:

    Mexico has taken one more important step to breaking up the monopoly of Petroleos Mexicanos, or Pemex, the grossly inefficient government-owned producer and retailer of oil and gasoline. That’s good news for everybody. Soon the signs of happier motoring will go up on Mexican roadsides. Gulf de Mexico will be the first.

    The world’s 10th largest economy has been growing at 4 to 5 percent over the past few years, well below its potential. The World Bank reckons fewer than 2 percent of the 126 million Mexicans live below the international poverty line, but that may underestimate the reality. The Mexican government estimates that a third of the population lives in moderate poverty, and 10 percent of that lives in extreme poverty.

    Competing with Brazil as Latin America’s largest economy, the country has vast disparities of income. The most prosperous states border the Rio Grande or Mexico City. Remittances, largely from the United States, are an important part of Mexico’s national income. More than $22 billion went south in 2012. The Mexican economy produces tax revenues of less than 20 percent of its gross domestic product.


    Mexico is the sixth largest oil producer in the world, but its exports have fallen dramatically over the past quarter of a century, from more than half of all exports in 1980 to just 7 percent by the year 2000. Most analysts agree that this is largely the result of the inefficient monopoly over its oil resources and distribution. Although it produces 60 percent of the nation’s revenues, Pemex has neither the capital nor the technology to meet demand. But Pemex has long been the holy of holies for Mexico’s left, which has fought against opening the market to competition and collaboration with foreign oil companies. Finally, in 2014, Pemex privatized parts of the monopoly.

    Private companies will be allowed to import gasoline for the first time since the late 1930s. That will permit the 11,400 independently owned gasoline stations, now bound to Pemex, to sell other brands of oil and gasoline. The government had earlier permitted Pemex to form joint ventures with foreign companies to explore for more oil. Given the sleepy Mexican bureaucracy, with its talent for getting in the way of progress, years may go by before the latest technology arrives.

    Opening gasoline stations to other brands will be the most visible change, and should encourage a faster transition to private development. Competition always does. London-based Gulf Oil International will soon put its Gulf de Mexico brand on a few stations in the largest cities, and expects to expand a national network of stations. Motorists will feel relief from the poor service at most Pemex stations; the Mexican consumer-protection agency fields frequent complaints that stations shortchange customers at the pump.


    So, you say Pemex is being belligerent, how can a government belligerent to itself?
    #58
  19. Dan Diego

    Dan Diego Long timer

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    You have the political knowledge. All I have is the nationality, the distrust of the GoM and a useless Poli-Sci degree.

    The GoM wouldn't punish the people for their pleas to privatize Pemex and share the wealth? Pena-Nieto simply states that the price rises were needed to stave off cuts to welfare services.

    I may not know exactly why the prices are increasing, but I assure you corruption has played a role in this. Corruption affects everything in Mexico.

    In 2015, Mexico passed legislation allowing for the privatization of municipal water companies. At the time the legislation was passed, the government said privatization would lead to cheaper prices and cleaner water. Puebla, one of the first states to privatize its water supply, today has the most expensive water of any major city in Mexico. Its prices are about 10 times higher than neighboring Mexico state, according to the National Water Commission. And the cherry on top? The city’s tap water remains undrinkable.

    Now, the government is turning its focus to the oil sector, where state firm Pemex has held a monopoly for more than 70 years. Expect great things! (Not.)
    #59
  20. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    I don't have any political knowledge, I'm a geologist who at one time worked in the oil patch. You are presenting a political view. As far as I'm concerned, politics here in the USA has fucked everything up enough as it is, I personally choose to not get wound up in Mexico's politics either. Similar to the way I feel about the USA, I love the country and the people of Mexico, politics and politicians not so much.
    #60