Mexico Route Planning Advise Needed

Discussion in 'Latin America' started by Jammin, Sep 12, 2007.

  1. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    Good idea there Bananaman. I have one such flask and clear spirits to fill it with. Maybe I'll bring back some rare agave juice :grinner

    Yup, If I can hook up with someone in Bato or Creel, then I'll head out the back way. Thanx, that route sounds good as I do want to ride more dirt before hitting all tarmac.
    #41
  2. acejones

    acejones Long timer

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    Kiko is right about med evac insurance. Read the policy closely. Most will require that you be admitted to a hospital first, then evaluated. Note the word hospital; most small towns and villages don't have hospitals, only clinics. So, you've got to get to a place large enough for a hospital first. Read the policy closely and know what you are buying.
    #42
  3. boother

    boother Been here awhile

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    Wish I had the time right now to go and I would suggest we could meet up and take my truck with the bikes. Take turns driving and drive straight thru, there and back. Get there quick and well rested. Then have a lot more fun South of the Border. Sure you don't want to wait until November or after the first of the year? :evil Work is just too hectic right now.

    As far as only taking 2 weeks, screw it. Take whatever time you have and go for it. Sure beats not going. I know that a lot of the members here must be independently wealthy, retired or something because many are always taking several week/month trips. Good for them, I sure wish I could. 2 weeks is all I'll ever get off work so I will have to do some careful planning. Maybe I could take a medical leave...temporary insanity! :D

    I want to do this trip and I want to do Alaska/NWT. Best bet for me is to buddy up, drive the truck as fast as we can (switching drivers), find an airport with long term parking for the truck and then make the most out of riding the bikes.

    So defintely let us know how it goes!
    #43
  4. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    Yup, I've read the fine print and know that even I get a broken foot and am not considered in-patient, then I won't get the flight back home. But I guess this is still good in case of a really serious accident (I'm thinking like, getting shoved off a cliff by two on-coming trucks :ddog, or getting hit by other traffic :huh). Let's hope I don't have to use it :brow

    I totally feel for you boother. Sorry man, but I gotta go now because of work schedules and also made plans to meet some friends down there, but I'm up for an Alaska trip next year... and your plan sounds good.
    #44
  5. gageezer

    gageezer Been here awhile

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    From my experience, it looks like you've gotten some really good advice, none of which I disagree with, so I just thought I would mention my favorite 3 routes in my limited travel in Mexico.

    Durango to Mazatlan Highway 40

    Queretaro to Bernal to Xilitla. Stop for lunch in Bernal.

    Delores Hidalgo to Guanajuato. Short trip, only about 35 miles, but very nice. Lunch in Santa Rosa.

    Email me if you're near San Miguel and we'll have a beer.:D

    Oh, and if the roads don't look interesting and you have a choice, take the quota. They're expensive but much safer than dodging those trucks.

    Ride to eat,
    Eat to ride.

    Art
    #45
  6. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    Excellent, thanx Art. I might be heading into San Miguel, I'll pm you.

    Guys, I need some advice regarding my first few days in Mexico. I'm planning to reach the border Presidio/Ojinaga this Sunday night. Should I cross the border at night and stay in Ojinaga or is it better to cross the border in the morning? Just want to know from other's experience.

    Also, from there, my first destination is Batopilas. Looks to be about 300 miles from the border to Creel. From there it's another 5 hours to Batopilas, right? Can this be done in one day or would it be rushing it?

    Or should I spend the night at Creel and then spend a whole day getting to Bato?

    After that, I'll get a feel for how many miles I can ride in a day without rushing it.
    #46
  7. rous44

    rous44 Long timer

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    #47
  8. tlgreen

    tlgreen Dirty adventurer

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    I don't know, I can't turn this thing around...
    Hey Jammin, if you are still heading to Guadalajara, stay in Tonala at the Hacienda del Sol. It's a great little town right on the outskirts of Guad & for about $10 bucks you can cab it into the city & they will look after your bike in a secured parking lot for the day. Plus they have an internet cafe downstairs with great coffee, then you can update us on your trip at the same time.:nod
    Also, if you are doing the coastal route down, try going south from Puerto Vallarta past Tenacatita & Barra de Navidad. Great beaches, awesome food & lots of Canadians to party with. From Barra you can catch the main highway to Guadalajara.
    Have a great trip!!!!
    #48
  9. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

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    If you get there late I'd stay in Presidio and cross in the morning. Presidio isn't a great place but Ojinaga is worse. There's a fairly nice-looking (didn't stay there) little motel on 67 on the north end of Presidio. The closer you get to the border, the less apealing the town is...in my opinion anyway.

    I definitely don't recommend crossing in the evening and continuing thinking you'll find a place to stay "further on" into Mexico. There's damn near nothing for the first 100 miles or so. You'll end up pulling into Chihuahua City at midnight tired, and then almost certainly get lost trying to find a motel. Not cool.

    Yeah, you're looking at 300 miles to Creel on the shortest rout (through Cuauhtemoc). The time will depend on how lost you get in Chihuahua :lol3. If you're just trying to make time, get on the "quota" (toll road) in Ojinaga. It'll make the ride to Chihuahua somewhat faster. The "libre" is a very nice curvy road through the desert mountains if you have time.

    Ask here for directions through Chihuahua city. I'd offer some but I dont' think I've ever pulled it off without getting somewhat lost :huh

    You can ride Creel to Bat in less than 4 if you don't stop much and are comfortable making good time on the good stretches of dirt. It's about 40 miles of quality paved curves then 40 on the dirt. The first 15 or so on dirt is fairly fast, then you start down the mountain.

    So, would I try to go from Presidio to Batopilas in a day? Probably not but I'm a lazy ass and really like the scenery. I'm sure it can be done if all goes well and no significant delays with the border crossing or in Chihuahua. Leave yourself the option of staying in Creel if it gets late. That ride down the mountain would be very...uhh..."interesting" aftr dark.
    #49
  10. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

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    A bit more. When you come into Creel you'll be given the option of straight or veering left towards the town. If you're staying there, go left. You'll make a couple turns and then cross the tracks (where me and my GS decided to lay down in the middle of the road...long story :lol3). Just past the tracks is a 3-way stop. If you go left or right there you'll be on the road with most of the restaurants, bars, and motels. If you go straight there, you'll come to my recommended motel, Margaritas, just ahead on the right. Dinner and breakfast are included but the food isn't outstanding by Mexican standards. It's still a bargain IMO.

    If you plan on blowing through Creel, go straight at the split and it'll take you on out of town but, importantly, past the only gas station in town.

    After you cross the bridge into Bato you'll imediately turn left. The town seems long and you'll sort of start wondering if you're lost, but the main road will take you (after a couple turns) to the main square. At the far end of the square you'll see a place on the right with a bright orange gate. That's a very nice and recommended motel. The gate is where you can lock your bike up for the night. If the owner takes you down the road, it's because he owns another very nice one just a block away. Either one is great.

    You can sort of see the orange gate in the background...
    [​IMG]

    The upstairs porch/common area at that motel...
    [​IMG]

    The room in his "other" motel. It's a bit cheaper if I remember right.
    [​IMG]
    #50
  11. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    VR, thanx for all the good info. Yeah, I'm trying to avoid the cuotas and only take them towards the end of the trip if I'm running out of time. I'll take the scenic libre route. And sounds like I'll plan to stay in Creel and then take my time down to Bato. Thanx for the detailed route description, just what I was looking for. I guess if I get there early enough, I could try and scout the back way to Urique just for fun, to see if it's doable. I'll let the motel owner know that I'm heading out that way so in case I don't return by night, something's happened. :shog

    I have the auto-routing Bicimapas. Would that be enough to get me through Chihuahua? :scratch If not, can someone share some directions through there. I'm heading in from Ojinaga towards Creel.

    Excellent, thanx for that good info. Yup, planning to head to Gauda.

    I'm actually thinking right now after riding from Durango to Mazatlan, head down the coast to Sayulita, then east to Tequila and Guada, back to the coast near Manzanillo and then down the coast to Zihuatanejo, then inland to Teotihuacan (going around Mex City), then up to San Luis Potosi and Monterrey. How does that sound?
    #51
  12. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    Route question: is there a recommended route from Zihuatanejo to Teotihuacan that avoids the congestion of Mexico City? Or do I have to ride through the DF to get to the ruins? I know it's north east of the city, so trying to go around the southern part of the DF.

    That's going to be my southern most point, as I wont have time to make it down to Oaxaca :waysad
    #52
  13. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    +1

    Definitely do not plan to penetrate the canyon (1) at dusk/dark (2) when tired. Why would you want to not to be in anything but in a super-fresh state of mind/physical condition and (hopefully) under a bright blue sky when you are about to enjoy one of the most beautiful and desired vistas in the world? Stop often during the descent to take photographs and catch your breath. You'll have to pinch yourself to believe what you are taking in.

    If I were you, I'd cross at OJ on Sunday when you arrive, and get the paperwork done. Then either stay there or come back to Presidio and stay there until the morning. Either way, you can leave Presidio/OJ first thing fresh, and with everything taken care of.

    You could make it to Creel in one day from OJ - if thats what you want to do. It will be a long day. But it's Mexico, I wouldn't rush it. Take the libre road and enjoy the twisties through the desert and hills. Mexico has its own patina, a special flavor that needs to be savored.

    Take reasonable time, and be safe above all. :thumb

    Bob
    #53
  14. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

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    Getting the paperwork done the night before then crossing early in the AM is a good idea. I thought it was open 24 hours.

    Yeah, no reason not to head up that road a ways just to see what you think. If I remember right, you won't go far before you see some of the ugly climbs. Should you decide to go out that way, make sure you leave with some directions and plenty of water. The first 20 miles or so is confusing.

    Auto routing will most likely help. My biggest "lost" episode in Chihuahua was because of something going on that had the road blocked. Typical of Mexico, they had a sign that said "desvio" (detour) with an arrow but then absolutely nothing indicating what to do beyond that. "Detour" simply means "don't go this way". :lol3 I didn't have a GPS with me at the time.

    By the way, here are my two trip reports on the area if you're interested:
    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=237428
    http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=103609
    #54
  15. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    Ok, I think I'll just cross OJ first thing in the morning. I'm an Indian citizen, so I dont have the luxury of crossing back and forth across the US border. Everytime I enter or leave the US, lots of paper work :twitch Plus, I only have a single entry Mexican tourist visa. Yup, I need a visa to visit every country in the world :tough

    Maybe I'll make it to Cuauhtémoc on the first day and then Bato on the second. That sounds reasonable and enjoyable. And that flavor sounds pretty tasty... can't wait!

    going through them now...
    #55
  16. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

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    Ah yes, we do tend to forget that it's not as easy for everyone. Your plan sounds like a good one.

    By the way, I'm in Tulsa which is about the half-way point between Chicago and Ojinaga. I'll send my phone number to you in a PM. If you need anything while you're in NE Oklahoma, tools, local recommendations, a beer, something critical that you forgot, etc, give me a call & I'll do what I can.
    #56
  17. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    #57
  18. bananaman

    bananaman transcontimental

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    I don't know how long you've been in the US but could I suggest becoming a citizen? I have dual US/Panama citizenship and it comes in awful handy. Sometimes it's nice to have the Panama passport, sometimes it's nice to have the US passport. Panama doesn't care if I'm also a US citizen- Panama is one of those countries that does not recognize any kind of "citizenship revocation."

    I would have said "+1" to the paperwork at night/cross cross again in the morning idea.
    #58
  19. Virtual Rider

    Virtual Rider Traveler

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    Wow, thatnks. I love hearing that someone reads and appreciates the reports ane even more so, the pics.
    #59
  20. Jammin

    Jammin Integrating back into society

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    :wave

    Trust me, I would if I could in a heartbeat. I love this country. Been here since 99, but it's just such a bloody long process to do it legally through college and now work. Oh well, will keep chugging away at the paper work. I should have my green card in about 2 years and then it takes another 5 years to get citizenship :eek1

    It would make travel oh so much easier. I think I'll need it before I set off on my around the world trip. Otherwise, visas for every country would cost me too much :lol2 Do you know a tourist visa to Panama is $85 and single entry to Canada is $75!! :loco At least Europe is only like $35, along with Mexico.
    #60