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Michelin anakee wild tire issue / failure

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Suburban_Hobo, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    So this happened today. I attempted to spoon an anakee wild on the the front wheel of my 2018 r1200gs. I purchased the tire last week and left it in the sun for a couple of hours to soften up and applied silicone.

    Has anyone else had this issue? Is the tire toast? Thanks.

    20200628_140542.jpg 20200628_140703.jpg
    #1
  2. Hedonist222

    Hedonist222 Been here awhile

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    I've frankly never seen anything like this

    And I'm glad the morbid manufacturer's defect emerged like this - and not during a ride

    I'd have a very serious conversation with Michelin
    #2
  3. Emmett

    Emmett Been here awhile Supporter

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    What's the manufacture date on the tire? Just wondering if it's an old tire.
    #3
  4. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    I'm pretty sure its 2018. There were zero signs of dry rot or tearing prior to mounting. See picture. 20200628_153330.jpg
    #4
  5. davidji

    davidji bike curious

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    The other side of the tire bead needs to be in the rim's drop center to spoon that last bit on. If you spooned it on with the bead in place, it makes sense that the bead got destroyed. Is that how you normally do it? It's hard enough doing it the other way.
    #5
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  6. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    The bead was not in place. I just went out and checked to be sure (I left it as it was as I was irritated). I heated it in the sun and had a good bit of silicone on it so I'm not sure where I went wrong (if I did). I do know I chased it around the rim which is why you can see the valve where I'm ending instead of starting. Also, I was using motion pro bead breakers and T6 spoon.
    #6
  7. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

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    Yes, manufactured in the 48th week of 2018 per the DOT date in the picture so less than 2 years old. Damage could either be a defect or from incorrect installation. T6 spoons aren't really long so it's more difficult with those to use too much force vs longer spoons. I usually kneel on the bead 180 degrees across the last little bit of bead being levered over the rim and take really small steps to get that last bit of bead over. Were you really straining to get it over or just normal effort?
    #7
  8. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    your picture shows the opposite bead seated, not down in the drop center. If nothing else you can cut little blocks of wood to put between the bead and the rim to keep it from coming up while you’re working that last bit opposite side.

    let’s see a picture of the tire off the rim, you may be able to salvage it with a tube, but if that’s a tubeless installation it won’t seal. Whether to add a tube depends on the bike and how your gonna ride it, may be too damaged.
    #8
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  9. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    Honestly, this one was a struggle hence the dried silicone everywhere. The rear went on relatively easy once warm. If this was an expensive lesson I would prefer to learn from it. On the other hand if its a defect I'd also like to know...
    #9
  10. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    Thanks for the tip on the blocks. Even though it doesn't look like it, the bead was not in the center. I had some 1x2 pieces from another project so I tried to see if that would help. And there was another tear! This time on the opposite side. Not sure what to make of it now. Where the f@#* did I go wrong???

    20200628_162443.jpg 20200628_162451.jpg
    #10
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  11. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    The bead is in the center now (with the blocks), and that’s what you want when you’re spooning the last of the bead on the opposite side. You may need a couple more blocks to get even more of the opposite bead down in the drop center of the rim. That buys you the room to get that last bit over the rim. A warm tire stretches easier, but tears easier, so it’s a trade off.

    The “art” is knowing how much force you can use, but if you’re working that hard and things are tearing, you’re doing it wrong. Last year I was having troubles while I was on a trip spooning a new front tire on my motard, I was right at the point where I thought I was going to injure the tire. I gave up with the spoons and tried the “zip tie” technique for the first time, and the beads slipped right over. Lots of threads here about using zip ties, I’d never tried it before. I have a pneumatic machine in my shop, you can really destroy tires if you’re not paying attention because youre not using any physical strength. I damaged one years ago and I didn’t even know until I tried to inflate the tire and it was leaking along the bead where I damaged it. No structural damage so I slipped a tube in and was good to go.

    The problem with levers / spoons is that you have to stretch the bead even further than you would normalLy in a machine because the lever itself takes up some room and effectively makes the rim wider. That’s why the tools like the Karitmoto work so well, they push the bead over the rim, without getting in the way. But they don’t work for dismounting, so you still need levers for that. But the old tire removal almost never gives you as much trouble as a fresh tire install.
    #11
  12. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    That makes sense with the heat and tearing but I can't be the only one who has encountered although I haven't heard of any reports of tearing when they have warmed up so maybe just my bad technique. What is the mounting tool you speak of? My google search comes up with kaurimoto out of Estonia. Is there anything like it in the states?

    The tire is on a 2018 1200GS. So now I need to decide if I want to trust a tube (which means removing the tpms..."oh no!" ) or tell my wife I made a $165 mistake. Not sure which is the more dangerous of the two...
    #12
  13. Motomantra

    Motomantra Registered Lurker

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    BOTH the upper & lower beads must be in the deep, center part of the rim/wheel.
    I vote install error.
    #13
  14. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    Thanks for the response. Both beads were for sure in the center when the second tear occurred. Have you mounted these tires before? Any other advice or suggestions?
    #14
  15. katbeanz

    katbeanz earthbound misfit, I Supporter

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    I'm running one on my 05, it wasn't easy. You say silicone, like silicone grease? Guys rave about ru-glide, but haven't found it in less than a gallon. Used to use wd40 for tubed dirt bike tires and still use the small spoons slipped inside a leather glove ala JVB.
    #15
  16. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    No, I wouldn’t tube that tire for the front of a GS, I think the structural integrity is gone, keep it for practice.

    Karitmoto is in Estonia, there are hundreds floating around since we did 3 group buys here on ADV in 2013 and 2014. The Baja No Pinch is a cheaper knock off. Post up a WTB in the FM if you’re interested and although it’s a nice tool, and makes up for lack of finesse with tire irons, you don’t really need it. And learning how to spoon tires without damaging the tire, damaging the rim and not working up a sweat is a great skill to have. Especially if you’re gonna travel other places besides Chargebucks.

    I’ve got several take offs in 170/60, wish I had a way to get one to you. But use the damaged one, when you can spoon it on and off without ripping it anymore, you’ll be ready to spoon on a new tire. Or buy a Shinko for 90 bucks until you build up your confidence. I damaged a set of rotors from a GSXR750 years ago when I was learning, not my bike so I got to buy my friend a new set, and since I wasn’t charging for tires back then, it was more than a 165 mistake. But you can bet I haven’t damaged a rim since.
    #16
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  17. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    I used Ruglide, a gallon of it, years ago. I thought it dried too quick and didn’t really make the tire as slippery as I thought it should. I’ll get a pic of what I use now when I walk out to the shop tonite. One thing I do, since my rims are all pretty nice, is wipe between the rim and tire after it’s all mounted but before I inflate. On the side of the road I leave the lube on to help with seating the bead since I don’t have 120 psi at my fingertips. Yours being tubeless most likely you’ll plug it on trip and won’t have to worry about reseating the beads unless you run a long way and break the beads from heating it up while riding with it flat.
    #17
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  18. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    Thanks, I appreciate it. I agree the tube on the front is probably a bad idea and I will definitely be using this tire to figure out where I went wrong.
    #18
  19. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    #19
  20. Suburban_Hobo

    Suburban_Hobo Can you point me to the nearest Starbucks?

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    I have heard good things about Murphy's. I will be buying it in the future.

    As an aside. I thought about the wood blocks and zip tie methods. They are basically all about compression. I didn't have large zip ties but I did have these Dewalt clamps. Four of these, one tire spoon and less than a minute later I had the tire on...no lube, no straining just pure magic. Of course the tire won't seal due to my original tears but problem solved!

    Now that doesn't solve the issue of doing it in the wild but still, I think I solved my shop changes or a while. Thanks for the advice!

    20200628_191845.jpg
    #20
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