Mikuni vacuum fuel pump install and battery relocate

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by Somewhere Far Beyond, Nov 22, 2014.

  1. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]So I've finished up on a project I'd thought about doing for awhile, and circumstances sort of forced the project upon me. I fired up my 04 950 Adventure and let her run up to temp. A couple minutes of smooth running, followed by a cough and sputter, and finally she died. Would crank, but not restart.



    Fuel pump was my first thought, and my hunch turned out to be correct. Power to pump? Yep. Pump cycling? Nope.


    Pulled the pump apart to inspect the points and found this...


    [​IMG]




    Gotta say, I am completely and utterly surprised that this thing was working as long as it did.


    At the point this happened, I hadn't had the bike very long or put very many miles on it. A little over 1k maybe. I have a Dr. Bean kit that I was planning on using to rebuild the pump with, but seeing this I decided to push towards a different solution I'd heard about. After some emails back and forth and a few days' time, I had an AlternateCycle Mikuni vacuum fuel pump kit delivered to me.


    I decided that at this time I would also upgrade the battery and relocate it to the mostly unused storage compartment under the seat.

    Here's what the battery looked like when I pulled it out.

    [​IMG]



    Yes, that's the negative battery terminal laying on top. It physically seperated from the battery case trying to remove it. Junk!



    I decided since I was moving the battery up to the storage compartment under the seat, I would go with a lighter option. Entire the Shorai. Most people seem to put a LFX18A1-BS12 in there. Shorai themselves recommend the LFX19A4-BS12 on the website, so that's the one I went with.

    The Mikuni vacuum fuel pump install kit can be found at http://www.alternatecycle.com/ktm950fuelpump.html

    To be honest, I found this kit inadequate to my install. It included several lengths of fuel line hose and some pinch style clamps. I didn't take pictures of what you get, sorry.

    Here's a picture I had taken of the pump, though. The large brass fitting pointing straight up in the pic is the vacuum port, and the arrows on the pump case show the direction of fuel flow. One inlet, two outlets.

    [​IMG]

    The idea of two fuel outlets is that each fuel outlet would go to one carb. The instructions tell you to mount the fuel pump on the back of the airbox, drill two holes in the back for fuel lines, and run those lines from the two fuel outlets each directly to one of the carbs, eliminating the "y"-shaped connection to the carbs from the original fuel pump. They don't adequately explain how that works in the instructions, and though the lengths of fuel hose they provided me were the correct length per the instructions, there was no way in hell they were going to reach the carbs from the pump.
    That is odd, but fortunately working in an automotive shop I have access to various fuel hoses in bulk, so I made use of what I needed from that.
    Another thing that bothers me about this pump and kit is that everything in the kit is 1/4", and all the stock KTM hoses and fittings are 5/16". So to make everything work the way I wanted, I had the obtain seperate brass fittings to go from 1/4" to 5/16". The only piece of hose that was right in the kit is the vacuum line provided.

    I also decided that to minimize modification to the airbox, I would Tee the two pump outlet ports together and run them into the stock "Y" shaped inlet to the carbs via a brass T connector. I saw pictures here of another inmate that did the same thing. It works, and there's less plumbing because of it.

    Here's the pump with brass Tee and pinch clamps in place.

    [​IMG]



    A nice, clean install.

    Now, I went ahead with mounting the pump on back of airbox as suggested, however instead of using the hardware provided and drilling a couple mounting holes in the airbox, I used one of the holes already in place for the SAS mounting bracket and stock hardware.

    [​IMG]



    Note that the SAS mounting bracket was left in place. Why? Because it has those nifty rubber bufferes for the airbox that you see on the sides there. I simply ground off the tabs for the SAS stuff and put the bracket back in place.

    The pic above shows all the lines hooked up to the fuel pump. The vacuum line runs to a small vacuum fitting on the rear cylinder intake just below the airbox on the right hand side of the engine.


    Remember that I mentioned all the vacuum pump fittings were 1/4", and the stock KTM hosing/fittings/petcock are 5/16". Not much difference, but enough that I didn't want to run 5/16" hose onto 1/4" fittings and hope they would seal, even with pinch clamps. So to run from the left tank petcock to the pump, and from the pump lines to the carbs, I fashioned up some brass fittings from Napa to make the join.

    Here they are on the left hand side of the airbox.

    [​IMG]


    The fitting on the bottom is from petcock to pump inlet, the one of top is from outlets to carbs. I chose to tie them in here because it makes them easier to access for service. I used worm clamps instead of pinch style because it allows me to disconnect the lines easier if I need to. No leaks as of yet!


    To be honest, that's about all you need to know for this pump install. I should get more pictures for you guys and some part numbers in case anyone wants to know. :lol3


    I then continued on with my battery install. I opted to move the wiring around a bit to get things up and out of the water. I wanted the battery rectifier and starter relay moved up, and kind of had to since I wanted to remove the battery box as well, which the brakects for the rectifier and starter relay are mounted to anyways.

    So remove all of this crap.

    [​IMG]




    That's the battery box pieces and electrical brackets.

    I then removed the battery rectifier and starter relay, and moved the main harness wiring upwards a bit to where it was still out of the way, but I could hook up the rectifier and starter relay easily enough WITHOUT stock wiring modification.

    Moving up the wiring...

    [​IMG]



    In the above picture you can see the main harness hanging out as well as some small wiring for battery tender. I bundled the harness wiring alongside the airbox on the right hand side of the bike, above and behind the oil tank. This way it minimizes interference with access to some of the cooling system and oil hoses.


    On my bike, right hand side above the oil tank attached to the frame is a small metal tab that something was supposed to have been mounted to. I don't know if this was for SAS (when I got the bike all that stuff was already removed) or fuel injection stuff or some such thing, but I decided to use that spot for the starter relay. I used rubber pieces from the old stocker fuel pump mount and ziptied them to the relay, and mounted it thusly.

    [​IMG]


    The white bubbly stuff on the tab is Liquid Wrench. :deal Works great for lubing up that rubber. You can see the main harness ziptied behind the relay to the frame. The white connector near the hole in the airbox there is where the rectifier hooks up. More on that in a minute.

    Now, I know that the relay is mounted right behind the radiator with not much clearance. Maybe 2 inches between radiator and relay. I was at first concerned about mounting the relay there, but some professional buddies of mine have suggested that it won't likely be an issue. Time will tell.

    Moving to the left hand side of the bike, I moved the rectifier wiring up behind the oil tank and in front of the airbox.

    [​IMG]


    This leads me to the one part of this install I do not really like and would like to improve on in the future when I have time. I put the rectifier here.

    [​IMG]


    It is not mounted to the airbox, rather it is sitting on top of the airbox between the breather hose and the airbox snorkel. Trust me, it's not going anywhere. But I don't want to leave it there. It was pretty much the only place I could think to put it given the limitations of the stock wiring. For now this is temporary. Does anybody else have any ideas? I may have to extend the stock wiring and just move it to the front behind the fairing. For now, it is safe.

    The new battery in the airbox. I used a generous amount of the foam padding provided with the battery to keep the battery firmly in place. Moreso than you see in the picture, yes.

    [​IMG]




    I had a local battery shop make me a new positive cable and new negative cable for the battery. I did this for two reasons. One is that the stock cables were too corroded for me to want to reuses. The other is that the stock cables were too short anyways. :lol3

    The cable that goes from the starter relay to the starter was reused, however, and turned out to be a good length from where I mounted the relay.

    [​IMG]



    I drilled a hole in the front of the airbox for the battery cables and tender wires to pass through. As luck would have it, I had a rubber grommet lying around that fit the hole perfectly.

    [​IMG]


    Tender wires are routed along the left hand side frame rails up to the handlebars where my tender connector is mounted. Battery cables route down the right hand side frame rails.

    [​IMG]


    In the above picture you can see the vacuum line routing under the airbox to the vacuum fitting. The is a vacuum fitting on the same side on the front cylinder that needs to be capped off.


    [​IMG]


    The above pictures shows that the negative battery cable has been grounded at one of the starter mounting bolts.


    No more battery box down there!

    [​IMG]



    I reused the fuel hose that ties the two fuel tanks together and ziptied it to the holes where the battery box mounted before.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    After all this, I put the bike back together. Took several cranks to get enough fuel up to the carbs, but the setup so far is working perfectly!


    That's about it. Not much of a writeup as I don't have a lot of step by step pictures for you guys, but I hope somebody else thinking about this will find this informative.

    Perhaps somebody can give me some pointers on where to put the rectifier as a final position or make suggestions to make these mods cleaner.

    I welcome all questions and comments as I'm still learning the ins and outs of the big Katoom myself, and want to try and help others as much as possible. In the meantime, I think the bike is more reliable that ever and ready for some nice, hard miles once the weather warms up! :norton
    #1
  2. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

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    Hal Of Wisdom nomination! Nice job!
    #2
  3. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Thanks, Chuck! :clap
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  4. Qwik

    Qwik Adrenaline Addict

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    That space in the belly pan would be a good location for a spare tube or a pump or.........?
    #4
  5. HeatXfer

    HeatXfer Bad knees

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    Very nice. If my 990 didn't have abs I'd love to relocate the battery there. Have you considered the possible effect that engine and radiator heat might have on the starter relay? The stock location keeps it in a relatively cool place.
    #5
  6. AJ990R

    AJ990R motorcycle guy

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    Nice job.

    I don't like any of the electricals down there. Since I don't have ABSon my 990 and have a open air box, a CPR storage box would do the trick to keep & move my tool kit.

    Interesting, recently found that this company ....makes a bashplate with battery relocation necessary. 8mm thick. Believe it's kinda designed for their 2-1 exh
    http://twalcomusa.com/ttr-hard-enduro-engine-guard-950-990adv.html
    #6
  7. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Qwik: It's a good spot for lunch! :lol3


    HeatXfer: I have considered this, yes. I doubt any serious effect will be had on the starter relay, but time will tell. I will likely eventually relocate that relay under the front fairing. For now, this will suffice.


    AJ990R: Thank you much. I eventually plan to get a CPR/SW7/Rottweiler setup, and when I do, I will make updates here. Probably fab up a special bracket to relocate the pump. :wink:

    That bash plate is pretty neat, but I notice that the mounting parts are seperate pieces from the plate itself. :huh Not sure how I feel about that. Guess if you can replace individual mounting pieces that might bend up, it could be worth it.
    #7
  8. Qwik

    Qwik Adrenaline Addict

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    SFB, be sure that you turn off your fuel at the end of every ride. You can hydrolo I your engine if you don't. If you forget, put the engine in fourth gear, then roll it backwards a few feet and pop the clutch to clear the cylinders. DAMHIK
    #8
  9. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Yeah, I've been doing that. Had something interesting happen though.

    Had the petcock closed and the bike sat for a few days on the center stand.
    Bike was flooded when I went to start it. Almost like the fuel in the lines expanded. :huh
    So I ran it a bit, then closed the petcock and let the bike run for a few moments before shutting it off. Maybe with less fuel in the lines it won't do that.
    #9
  10. trob6

    trob6 Adventurer

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    Hello there, great write up, I to have fitted the same fuel pump as you and I initially put it on the back of the air box as you have which worked great in the colder months but in the summer I went out for a weekend camping and got stuck in some traffic and the pump got really hot and the bike cut out I think the fuel was just to hot, had to cool the pump down with wet rags and 15 minutes later all was well , it almost happened again on my way home so I moved it back to the stock location and since then it hasn't missed a beat as its nice and windy down there, just thought I would let you know.
    #10
  11. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    trob6, I remember seeing another post on the forum mentioning that same issue. Duly noted. I will have to make changes eventually if I go with a SW7 intake anyways. I've heard that the mikuni pumps do well in the stock spot even when dunked.
    #11
  12. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

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    Have you made any changes to your battery mount since this posting?
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    VTwinner likes this.
  13. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Not at present. Been putting focus on resealing the rocker cover and rebuilding the water pump on my 640 Adventure. :wink:

    I've been toying with different ideas for the rectifier. Since I don't like the position sitting on top of the airbox, I'm considering moving it a bit more forward, around the ECU. Some custom mounting may have to be made.
    #13
  14. Chuckracer

    Chuckracer Jerkus Maximus

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    I'm doing this to mine now and don't have an airbox so the rectifier will have to go...somewhere!

    Need to figure out where I'm going to get battery cables from. Maybe Motoelectric can sort me out. I've got lots of time to sort it out.
    #14
  15. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Might have to alter the wiring for the recitifer to make it work out. I've considered this possibility myself. I'll have to pull the glovebox tomorrow and inspect. I'll let you know if I think of anything!
    #15
  16. mgorman

    mgorman Crashing since 1964

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    I'm installing a new harness on mine, may be a good time to make the same changes
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  17. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    I'm still trying to think of a good way to adjust position of the rectifier.

    Haven't had much time to address it. Finally got my 640 Adventure back together after the rocker cover reseal and water pump rebuild. :lol3
    #17
  18. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    So how is the battery relocation of the battery and the fuel pump working out? I'm really wanting to do these mods myself.
    #18
  19. Somewhere Far Beyond

    Somewhere Far Beyond The Narrator

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    Hey flux.
    That bike is, unfortunately, sold. To a member here that I'm keeping touch touch with. But for the duration I had it these mods held up super solid. Thinking on it, currently the only alteration I had in mind would be to replace those brass fittings I used with fuel quick disconnects for ease of later removal. The brass fittings were a cheaper option though.
    #19
  20. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    Thanks for the update! I think I'll give it all a shot in the future.
    #20