Misadventures of a Hoosierbilly Motorcycle Tramp

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by JB2, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Headed up JB2's way on the 5th and coming back the 6th. We'll have to plan a ride to meet up next year!
  2. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    DAY 5: This day would be the one that sticks out as the most rewarding so far as dry-road extremes, the scenery and routes goes. It took a lot longer to ride this 80+ miles on our third outing than higher miles from the previous two days... even stuck in the mud for an hour.

    We decided against skipping breakfast and ate at the Hill City Cafe. They got a great breakfast buffet. The day greeted us with cool temps, overcast skies and intermittent sprinkles. A great day to ride so long as the rain holds off. The weather station said there was zero percent chance of rain even though it was sprinkling. We did not care, so we picked some roads and destinations then departed for another day on the backroads.

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    This is the first stop of the morning along FS291. The Beemer looks like it belongs here.

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    Here is the road we are traversing. This image really paints a different perspective of how cool these roads are.

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    A little further down the road and we stopped at another pullout. A couple of things to note; first, there seems to be plenty of pullouts along the roads the timber haulers use and second, there are a lot of "NO TRESPASSING" signs. There are also signs that say not to travel on roads that aren't numbered. We didn't see anything like that until today. However, we're in a different area so the 'scapes and the signage are all different. At this point we're looking for FS296. Its a loop that leads down to Bear Mountain Lookout. It looked interesting and it was.

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    We got lost looking for FS296 only to find out here that we were on it. We were at yet another unmarked fork in the road, even though when we turned onto it was marked FS296. Jim's GPS has got us lost and also got us found. The GPS says to go left but wait, there's grass growing in the middle of the road. We're going anyway. :thumb

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    We stopped here for a few minutes, took a break then went left the way it(GPS) said to go. I took several pictures here, this being one of them. The girl has a nice ass on her so that makes it even better.

    After getting lost and finding that we were riding the road we were looking for I realized that we were back at the same intersection. WTF? The GPS said the road was back that-a-way. Not the way we had came but rather a different route, FS291. We just hadn't rode far enough to find it. I was all excited about FS296, which was awesome, so we weren't really lost and pointed our bikes towards Bear Mountain Lookout.

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    The balance of FS291 down to the Bear Mountain Road was just as perfect as everything we had done today so we rode straight to the access road and then up the mountain 5 miles to arrive here.

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    Jim taking pictures of his GS. There were public restrooms here and we contemplated climbing the tower but opted out. Yesterday had left us with no pulled muscles or injuries but the view from almost every angle was nearly the same as from the tower... or so it would seem. And, it did snow while we were up here. Not long, not much, but real snow. Cool!

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    Just one of the numerous views from Bear Mountain Lookout. The contour of the land is decidedly different here than it is just 25 miles north of here.

    We rode back to Hill City retracing some of our steps but seen new vistas while continuing on further south on FS288. It had been a great day. I had no idea our mileage was only in the 80 mile range. We had been at this day for more hours than the previous two days.

    Some observations from the day; first, FS291 had been graded and graveled recently. It was some of the worst marbles I have ever been on. 25mph was about as fast as the Yamaha could deal with the loose rock. Second, the bike refuses to handle well sitting on the seat. It does respond well to riding on the pegs. I think Jim would tell you I spent the better part of the three days on the pegs. Third, FS296 and Bear Mountain Road were both heavily wash-boarded. The bike would simply run away after about the third ripple. On the pegs, a very loose grip on the bars coupled with a controlled idle in second gear was the only way to get across them... and there were many. Fourth, the cows and deer. I had an early morning rush when a deer was running beside me. I saw him right away and had the chance to let him decide his direction without the possibility of crashing into him. The next surprise came when we ran into one of the many herds of open-range cattle. The herd was split with some on the downhill side, some on the uphill side and some standing in the middle of the road. We waited a minute then Jim took a stab at splitting them off the road. They responded well so I started through the gap. About that time a calf started running along side the road. I suspected it would turn towards mommy-cow and cross in front of me. It did but thankfully again there was room to avoid the collision.

    Once back in Hill City we choose a return trip to Desperados. Jim had the pork brisket and I had the country fried steak, one of their specialties. Man it was good. We ended the day with another shot of McCallum while we talked about how great the roads were. We were checking the square we had chosen to ride and noticed some destinations and roads that we had not been down... yet. Day 5 was in the books but there would be more surprises come the next day.

    There is not a much better song to celebrate the day with. We were on the southside of heaven for most of the day. It was a good place to be.


    Stay Tuned!​
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  3. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

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    Haven't read all the posts regarding your trip yet but got through the "deer strike/meetup at lodging" post.
    Sorry about the deer. NOT sorry you are safe. That's a scary situation, especially on two wheels !

    Great job writing. Grabbing popcorn and then will continue :)

    Update: Now I've made it through post #282 - waiting for more...
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  4. jdfog2

    jdfog2 Been here awhile

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    This is very VStrom-ish country you're riding. Heck, even more so DR 650 "bush pig" country!
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  5. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    jdfog2 - I actually think a WR450 would be best or something of that caliber. Jim's bike outweighed mine by 100 pounds. I can only imagine how difficult that would have been to free from the mud. Of course with the higher ground clearance and narrower peg set he might have made it by going right through the rut. We never tried so...

    DAY 6 coming tomorrow night.
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  6. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    DAY 6: To start off the day was news from Tuesday. It seems there was going to be the annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup that Friday. (Check the link!) People come from all over the USA and the world to see the event. They are herded by real cowboys, and girls, on horseback. Watchers are kept in a fenced area while the rustlers herd them into their wintering homes. Around 1300 buffalo are sorted with the new family members getting their brands and others being sold at auction. They have to keep the herd thinned to protect their survival within park boundaries. It supposed to be quite the experience. They serve a pancake breakfast and dinner. People sit in chairs, in the beds of their trucks and the roofs of their cars/RVs to watch. Kind of like an early morning tailgating party for real buffalos, not the football kind. :thumb

    Mary had told us about it Tuesday evening. The newlywed neighbors were interested and so were we. When we got back Wednesday evening she had printed the information sheet and the map for the two areas to watch the roundup from. We had kicked around the idea and were getting closer to pulling the trigger on the event. It seemed like a once-in-a-lifetime deal for us. The plan was to drive the truck because of the sheer number of spectators all being confined into two viewing areas for our safety, from the buffalo.


    On the rarest of occasions I was up before Jim. I wanted to get the truck cleaned up if we decided to go the roundup tomorrow. It still had deer goo down the driver's side. Our days had been so intense up to this point this was the first chance I'd had to take care of it. In the shower and out the door to the carwash. I only spent six dollars on the effort and just got the worst of it off. There were still shadows of the streaks she left behind but the meat of it was gone.

    I returned to the motel and Jim wasn't quite ready to roll. We were going to head back to Hill City Cafe for breakfast again. While he was getting ready I ran downtown to shop for family gifts. One of the stores was right where they have been replacing the sidewalk so there was a narrow walkway fronting the stores along a two block stretch with an entrance at either end. The one closest to Gold Diggers had a steep step going up. Ahhh! I'm climbing up with my left hip goes limp. No pain, just no feeling and I luckily fell into a sitting position on the next step. WTF? I try the next step and the same thing happens only I have a newel post to grab to avoid falling and losing face with the pedestrians.

    A twenty year old motorcycle injury to my left hip seemed to be rearing its ugly head. All seems good after that but I know from the mud-hole incident and all the time I spent standing on pegs that time was catching up with me. It bothered me. Its my landing leg, don't want this happen on the bike.

    I get my shopping done and head back to the motel. Jim is waiting so we hop back in the truck and off to the cafe we went. I told him about the deal. He offered to, "Hey, if you want to take a day off, I'm all for it." As we talked I decided to play it by ear(feel). We'd eat breakfast and pre-run the roads we were going to ride today driving the truck. If all was well after a dose of Aleve we'd go riding in the afternoon. Let's go!

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    We retraced our steps back through Mystic and Rochford hoping to find the Moonshine Gulch Saloon open for a change. On our third attempt we struck out again. Oh well, next trip. We did go into "The Small Of America" right across the street. Its the world's smallest mall. Its hard to tell what is for sale and what is not... until you ask. "Oh, everything is for sale!", comes the response. My kind of place. It was small but I think she had one of everything. We shopped a little. I found some note cards with images of Harley riders doing burnouts and wheelies in front of the saloon. Cool.

    Our next stop was the Custer Peak Lookout. All the fire lookouts are marked on this map. That part of it is accurate. :nod What they don't tell you is if there is public access or not. :scratch

    We took 17 north out of Rochford looking for FS256. FS256 would take us over to the Black Hills Parkway just south of the road up to Custer Peak. Every once in a while the map matches the roads as it did today in another area we hadn't explored yet.

    Our trip in the truck was proving to be pretty grand for two old bikers. We found every road we were looking for and soon found ourselves at a "NO TRESPASSING" sign at the top of Custer Peak. Obviously it wasn't open to the public. The tower, as we could see it from our vantage point didn't look like a tower for people but rather electronics. I'm sure it was manned but from monitors either on site or remotely. Sometimes our progress as humans is an embarrassment to the old way of doing things. Born a century too late? Maybe. Can I take the bikes back with me? I'd go.

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    The good thing is we found Mystic Hills. It's a UV rental place with trails, a campground and RV park, with a beautiful lodge and restaurant.

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    If you're wondering' why I have a small obsesssion with "Mystic"... our good friend Lou Usher goes by Lou "Mystic" Usher. Its always a gem in the trip if we find a road, a town or a place with Mystic in the name. This is Jim FaceBooking the front of the building to Lou. Note the cheeky grin. :lol3

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    We ate at the Mystic Hill Lodge, feasting on hamburgers and various kinds of fried starches. From there we went back out to the parkway and headed south for a place called Silver City. After a short jaunt back on the asphalt we were soon back on gravel. This is one of the many vistas from the numerous pullouts on FS672.

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    Look close because from the distance we were viewing it looked like a barn. On closeup though it has three windows down each side and a chimney. Not sure what kind of building it was but look how the weather is turning out. Sunshine had been predicted for the entire day. I'm starting to think its getting close to the time to switch to bikes. I believe Jim was too. Hip good, let's work our way back after Silver City and get the bikes.

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    And we arrive in Silver City to find this signboard at the Volunteer Fire Department. It has an interesting history and a story behind the name. Silver was never found here. Go figure.

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    This is one of several log cabins that still remain in town. There's an old Catholic church, a Motel/Cabin Rental business but mostly older and really old homes.

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    Right next to the cabin was this place. We really couldn't tell if it was a business or a landscaping theme. The entire house was surrounded by treasures, if you're a picker.

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    Good Junk Girls. Well, "Good Junk" means we have something in common. Kindred spirits I'd never get to meet.

    The last chapter of the ride begins. If you're not into the wordy side of things then... We had been in and out of cell service for the entire trip. Once we had a bar of service at Mystic Hills when Jim posted to Lou. We did have a great drive from Silver City back to the Black Hills Parkway on FS251. I was feeling a whole lot more like a ride and our bellies still full from the meal at Mystic Lodge. We talked about driving the next morning down to the roundup and what we would ride after we got back.

    Once in range of Hill City I noticed Jim reading his messages with chagrinned look on his face. "Whats up?"

    "Snow." he says. Not the kind of snow we seen on Bear Mountain but the kind of snow that leaves you trapped where you've lodged for a day or two. It was coming down from Canada through Montana. Right across Jim's path home. It was coming in and would hit the area overnight Friday and all day Saturday. I think we both knew then the handwriting was on the wall.

    Back at the motel he had several calls to and from his son who was concerned. His son is a state trooper in Washington and had first hand knowledge of the storm track. We looked at it on the radar. Yeah, its there and its coming this way. There was that kind of moment when the roaring silence comes rushing in and a somber mood fills the air. After a few minutes of silence we both started apologizing for a quick end to the trip. He and Kim were worried about this old hip, I wasn't but... I was, kind of. Everyone was more worried about Jim's trip home. Leaving Saturday was not an option. Not to mention he only had about a penny's thickness down to his wear bars on the rear tire.

    It was time to call the adventure, and we did. At this point the buffalo roundup was only an option for me. I also had to consider a helping hand in loading the bike. So, we loaded the Yamaha and sorted out the room with the intent of leaving early the next morning. We told Doug and Mary we were going to cancel the room for Friday night. By dusk we had everything for each of us ready to roll at dawn.

    We drove down to the Conoco, filled the truck and grabbed some snack food. Jim bought a bag of caramel popcorn and I opted for an apple Danish.

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    We decided on one last outing to end the trip with. The Yamaha rode in the bed, looking forlorn through the window as if to ask why she was in the truck. We hit Cowboy Gulch Road which intersects with Battle Axe Road. Battle Axe Road is a short connecting road that intersects with Deerfield Lake Road.

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    I probably should have shot in panoramic to get the entire sign and the tractor. I really liked the old tractor. I think I got lost here once traveling alone. This was Jim and I's third trip down this stretch this week.

    Back at the room we talked a lot about the crazy adventure this had been and how Jim needed to make Missoula, MT by Friday night to get past the storm before it hit. According to the GPS it was around 700 miles. The conversation was long and before you know it Jim had consumed the entire bag of popcorn. :D

    Despite the situation we were in a good place with our decision and toasted the memories with an even bigger shot of McCallum. Sleep came quick for both of us once we turned in. I drifted off to a line in this song with a grin on my face. "What a long strange trip its been."



    A short story about the trip home and numerous thoughts about the the places, people and the Yamaha. DAY 7 & 8 tomorrow.

    Stay Tuned!​
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  7. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Been here awhile

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    This is why I ride an 800lbs Harley on pavement. I got all that off-roading out of my system owning a Jeep. I will never change another tire above 10,000ft elevation. Was seriously tempted to push that rental Jeep off the jack and let it tumble over the mountainside when I was young. Now that I’m old and tired I wouldn’t think twice.

    JB2: We know the only reason you wrestled that pig in the mud was the thought of having to ride pillion on Jim’s bike back to Hill City or endure the walk of shame.
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  8. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Been here awhile

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    Jim’s non-Adventure version of the GS is my favorite GS. And it looks at home in the Black Hills. I don’t know why everyone thinks they need a six gallon fuel tank to go to Starbucks.

    If you go back, next time hit The Mammoth Museum in Hot Springs. Coolest place out there.

    I’m not a bicycle rider, but one of the best things I’ve done in my life was ride the Mickelson Trail from Dumont down to Hill City - 20 miles all downhill. Gorgeous scenery. Rented bikes and shuttle in Hill City. Was not cheap. 10/10 would do again.
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  9. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Dad always taught us to get right back on the horse that threw ya. Leaving the bike wasn't even a consideration when we were in the fight against the mud. Maybe later we contemplated the outcome had we not be able to free her from its grip...

    ... but not in that moment. :nono

    George Mickelson Trail was over our shoulder almost every day. I'm not into bicycles either but maybe all downhill for one ride would work. :thumb

    We still have lots of roads left to ride so I'll probably be too old when I run out of motorcycle stuff.:gerg


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  10. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    DAY 7: Today was all business. Up at 6:00 am and off by first daylight. At about ten minutes til seven Jim was ready to roll despite it being deer-thirty. The motel and cabins were empty except for us and the newlywed couple next to us. Everyone was off to the buffalo roundup. After handshakes and a hug I watched Jim ride off into the sunrise. I hung around for a few more minutes making one last lap through the motel room to see if we left anything behind.

    700 miles for him would get him in the safe zone past the incoming storm. 700 miles would put me near Grinnell, Iowa. Jim had a short jaunt up to I-90 but I was going to retrace my path through Nebraska on the two-lanes before picking up I-80 near Omaha. I wasn't looking forward to the interstate grind but it was really the only fast way home so I soaked up the morning with the beauty of northern Nebraska.

    I stopped for a breakfast sandwich in Chadron, NE. After passing through Valentine I began to look for the place where I hit the doe. About 12 miles east of there I saw my first indication of the event when I passed a deer leg lying at the roadside. I figure I must be getting close. It seemed a lot closer to Valentine when I hit her for some reason. I thought I was around 5 miles from there but it was obviously further. Within another mile another leg decorated the roadside. I surely must be close to point of impact. Within a half mile was what remained of the carcass and bits of plastic from the front of the F150.

    I thought about the Ford and the Yamaha and how both were coming home with the scars from a grand adventure. Ray Wylie Hubbard's song came to mind. If it only said, "I'm bad on Fords and Yamahas, but I'll be good to you!"


    The day passed quickly considering the mileage and time on the road. About thirty minutes west of Grinnell I received a text that Jim had arrived in Missoula, MT. Good. I arrived in Grinnell and snagged a room at the Super 8 then sent a reply text saying I was in for the night too. We both had covered 700 miles going in opposite directions. Most of his was on interstate while 400+ miles of mine was on two-lane. Even with his additional gas stops he was able to cover the distance quicker. Day 7 was in the books.

    DAY 8: Sleep came quick and deep. The truck was backed up to the spot just below the window. I checked and everything was still there. In the shower and out the door by 6:00am local time. All interstate today and light rain. The nasty grind of Chicago and the impatient drivers waited for me and were there when I arrived. I have only been through Chi-town once when it wasn't raining and packed with traffic. Today was not that day. I know people who love this town but, I don't. I passed another time zone, lost another hour and was soon pointed east on IN26.

    Near home I passed through Fairmount. I had forgot this was the weekend for James Dean Days. The main intersection took nearly 15 minutes to get through. The sun was out, after I passed Chi-town of course. The roads were packed with hotrods of all years, colors and brands. It was a nice exclamation mark to the trip but I still had 15 miles to home.

    The call from Jim didn't come in until a few hours after I got home but he made back safely. Odd that Hill City is exactly 1150 miles and change for both of us. You couldn't have picked a more perfect place in the middle for us to meet.

    I had listened to Colter Wall most of the way to South Dakota and back. This song hits the mood I was in. I was ready to be home. I missed my wife and the critters.



    Thoughts and observations from 8 days on the road coming next.

    Stay Tuned!
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  11. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Trip Summary: I'm posting a bunch of thoughts from the adventure, the people we met and a review of the Yamaha. A bike that I have come to love and hate in the same breath. In short I will own this bike when I pass on to the other side.
    I'm listing them in random order as they fall out of my brain just to keep you on your toes. :beer

    1) 8 days. Only 300 miles in three days of riding the bike. The numbers don't scream adventure unless you were there.
    2) Red clay mud has a saturation rate greater than air or water.
    3) The other riders in the Black Hills almost never waved. However, on the back roads everyone we passed in a car waved with smiles on their face.
    4) We did not pass one single motorcycle on the backroads we traveled. We did pass a few ATV's & UV's(utility vehicles) but no bikes.
    5) No map nor GPS will completely help you out here but they do accurately help you get lost... which is a good thing.
    6) No amount of modifications will ever make the Yamaha a good dirt bike. I've followed @ChopperCharles and his quest to make his SCR950 more dirt worthy. I applaud him and have learned a lot about the bike from his modifications but, in stock form, its about as good as it will ever be.
    7) We left a lot on the table, especially after finding out about the roundup and not attending. I will be going back a fourth time, maybe more.
    8) Log trucks know the backroads and will always be hauling the mail. You will have plenty of warning though as a large cloud of dust can be spotted coming your way. Give them plenty of room or just pull over.
    9) Cell phone coverage is spotty at best. Its a good place to be. It really is.
    10) Never trust anything on four legs next to the road.
    11) From Silver City via FS251 back out to the Black Hill Parkway(US385) there are three additions of homes. Maybe 10-15 homes in each settlement. All high rent, 2-story homes... mansions even. Most of them brand new or newer homes.
    One of them had a sign that said; "You Are Traveling On A Public Road Through Private Property. Stay On The Road!" :finger

    You know we keep encroaching on the wilds of this great country. I'm not a tree-hugger by any means and I'm not a victim of class envy but, I may be channeling my inner Edward Abbey here. Can't we leave some of the wild and free, wild and free?
    12) Except for Crazy Horse all the places we went to and the roads we traveled are never seen by over 90% of tourists who come here.
    13) Thankfully there is not a McDonald's in Hill City. Hopefully they keep it that way.
    14) Off-season touring is the best. You might run into places that are closed for the season but you ain't missing much.
    15) We met Nate and Mike, a father and son team from eastern South Dakota. They came loaded with side-by-side ATV's to attend the buffalo roundup. Once they parked their trucks they did all their site-seeing from the ATV's with their wives. ATV's are plate-able and legal on most roads in South Dakota. Maybe an option for the future?
    16) A couple from Canada, who were originally Londoners, roomed next to us for two days. They were quite taken with our adventure. It was obvious from our conversations they were smitten with the area like we were.
    17) The newlyweds. They roomed next to us for several nights. He was a cattle rancher/dairy farmer by choice while working a day job and the family ranch in the evenings. Both were from northern Wisconsin. She had a pet deer as a child and spent a lot of time feeding the resident deer population. She also saved someone's pet turkey from a dog attack downtown and returned it to its owner. They too found out about the roundup and wanted to go with us Friday morning and tailgate together. She was adamant that we leave at 5:00am to get in line for a good spot. They came in late so we didn't get to talk to them Thursday night. When we left the next morning at 7:00am their truck was still parked and there were no lights on. :D Remember your honeymoon? :crash
    18) Every trip here reminds of how much I love this place. I will be back.

    Every once in a while you gotta break out of the norm and get out of your comfort zone just to make your normal everyday life more normal. This song says it best.


    Stay Tuned!​
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  12. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Love to know more about why you love the Yammie if #6 is correct. Any idea why it speaks to you to the point you figure you'll have it until passing happens?

    I enjoyed riding it, but you've spent a lot of time on it lately and I'm curious. :-)
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  13. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Joel - The V-Twin torque. The sound of the bike, especially with the stock exhaust. The look of the bike including the lines, the satin-spoked wheels and the steel fenders. The handling of the bike on pavement. Even with the low ground clearance and shallow lean angle its a joy to ride on pavement. And, for what its worth, I like its terse personality. It ain't smooth, homogenized and soulless like a Honda. There's no cult following like the MoCo so the chance of seeing another one on the road is pretty slim. There's not a 2" thick catalog of accessories for the entire Yamaha line let alone the Scrambler. It is the truest-to-form Scrambler made today. It really is a street bike with dirt tires and bolt-ons. Just like the days of the original Scramblers. I'm sure there's more reasons that are hard to explain...

    ...but if you make enough wrong turns and it'll be hard to miss.

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  14. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Been here awhile

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    No. No, we can't. Why? Cause we're 'Muricans who have zero sense of moderation. Reference the size of our current generation of pick-up trucks, houses, and waistlines.

    Timely insertion of my favorite joke: What' s the difference between an Environmentalist and a Developer?
    A: An Environmentalist already has a cabin in the woods.

    I have been going to Colorado since I climbed Mount Elbert (14,434 ft) when I was 15 years old. I still go several times a year to ski. And I have traveled extensively all over The West. (Hill City is a place I've considered living in retirement.) People ask me, "Why don't you move to Colorado or out West?" The truth is, I probably should have 30 years ago. But now I notice every home on every mountainside that, no matter how nice, is still a blight on the landscape. To me, the view of the mountain is more valuable than the view out of floor-to-ceiling windows on the mountainside. I don't understand why more people who claim to "... love the mountains ..." don't see that their 5,000 sqft McRanchLodge on the side of the mountain (visible from miles away) isn't enhancing the appearance of the mountain. This makes me question whether they really love the mountains.

    I've read "The Monkey Wrench Gang" a couple times, most recently within the last couple years (probably spurred by this topic). I can't say that I condone the actions contained in the book but it has probably shaped my current philosophy that keeps me grounded in Mayberry MN: If everybody moves to Paradise - it aint Paradise no more.

    And with that borderline political and outright social commentary, I'll post some pictures from my 2004 trip to the Black Hills. I've been a couple times since but this was the year my oldest son and I rode the Mickelson Trail.
    MickelsonTrail3.jpg

    MickelsonTrail4.jpg

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    JB2 likes this.
  15. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,411
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    RD - I've read Abbey's fiction including The Monkey Wrench Gang but Desert Solitaire remains one of my favorite books ever. Its a collection of true short stories when he was a park ranger at Arches National Park. You get a taste of his disdain for unfettered development without promoting vandalism. "Those stupid city people.", he says. I've bought several copies for friends over the years from Back Of Beyond Bookstore in Moab. Abbey was a regular there during his time in Moab. They have several signed copies on display and for sale there but were out of my price range. As a side note I read Desert Solitaire before my first trip there. A lot of the places we visited came directly from the book. I used it as an adventure guide. Good stuff.
    bobw likes this.
  16. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    533
    I think I read "Desert Solitaire" many years ago but I don't recall anything from it. Maybe I'll pick it up again now that I've finished the current collection of riding books.

    According to my GoodReads account, I have not read "Desert Solitaire" so I'll pick it up at the library.

    Thanks for the recommendation. Now to find out if I did read it and just forgot to log it. That's what GoodReads is for - to keep track of books you've read so that you don't always read the same ones!
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  17. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,411
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    I've updated the images and text for Day 6 and have some more thoughts about the ride to add later this evening. Kim has a concert tonight so I best be going.

    RD - I think you'll really like Desert Solitaire. It truly helps to understand his fiction by getting in the frame of mind he wrote them. The snake story is especially humorous... its all good though, every story. Cool pics too. Thanks for posting.
  18. 72 Yamaha RD350

    72 Yamaha RD350 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Oddometer:
    533
    Notice the siding of the red building in the picture I posted. The siding is made from lids of buckets used to transport a product to the area - it was a powdered cyanide used in the mining industry. Everyone needs a bucket. But what to do with the lids? Use them as siding for your barn! One of the coolest things I've ever seen.

    This is a picture of the inside of the Moonshine Gulch Saloon in 2004.

    mgs.jpg
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  19. Bhuff

    Bhuff Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    50
    Location:
    Greens Fork In
    Your adventure is in part of the country I have not seen. Makes me wonder if that's where we should go next year. But then I think trying to stand on the pegs of the Indian is impossible. Maybe I need to buy another bike?? Dont think momma would like that much.

    Anyway thank you for the ride report and remember while you were out there not having any fun we were at work just enjoying every minute!!!

    Uh yeah right. Reminds me of a Cody Jinks lyric. Wish I enjoyed what makes my living.
    JB2 likes this.
  20. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,153
    Location:
    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    We looked for the bike ride downhill trip while out there. No mention of it anywhere. Staff at the lodge vaguely remembered it, but seems that vendor is out of business.

    Another good read--but not bike related. Jayber Crow, by Wendell Berry. When does the cost of modernizing outweigh the benefit? One of my favorites. (Advrider book club now!)

    Bhuff, we tried to get you into the Desert Sled! :lol3

    You may have to rent a bike on Twisted Road rentals! Keep that beautiful bike pristine!
    bobw and JB2 like this.