Misadventures of a Hoosierbilly Motorcycle Tramp

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by JB2, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. 1stgenfarmboy

    1stgenfarmboy The Sherpa Man

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    Nice shots and RR, I started going to the covered bridge fest with my mom and dad when i was 9, I am 50 as of 2 days ago, love the area when it is off season, just way to many people for the fest now, I remember driving up to the mill in Mansfield and parking there, getting a bowl of chicken and noodles from the "only " food vender in town.....now there must be 150 food venders and 100,000 people on any day during the fest.

    I talked to a LEO from Bridgeton right after the dufus burned the bridge, he said it's a good thing they found the guy first because the towns people had a plain to hang him.

    We try to get over and camp at Rockville for a few days in the middle of the week during the fest, I just can't stop eating when i am there.
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  2. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    1stgenfarmboy - Couldn't agree with you more on avoiding the crowds and the festivals. I almost travel exclusively in the off season and plan trips that don't coincide with events or rallies. Last year when I went to Mecca on a parts run it was during the Bridge Festival and the traffic was thick and stagnate. I knew from scenery that I would have to come back but never during the festival.

    Your story of the bridge burning reminds of Dewey Bridge in eastern Utah. I am an Edward Abbey fan and had read of Dewey Bridge in several of his books. I was lucky enough to see it in 2004. The guy I was traveling with was bold about getting bikes around barriers so we compromised the posts at each end of the bridge by rowing our handlebars through the opening and rode onto it for a photo-op. Very cool.

    Years later I returned with two other inmates all giddy about showing them this really cool cable suspension bridge. When we pulled up the only thing left were the towers and the main cables. It was obvious it had been burnt. I asked around and found that a young boy had went camping on his own and picked Dewey Bridge for his campsite. The bridge had an asphalt surface and you can imagine what happened when he started his campfire. He fled the scene on his bicycle when the surface caught fire but by the time he found help it was already beyond saving. By the time the fire department got there it was gone. If I remember correctly the family had to move because it was a local landmark that was very special to all of the surrounding communities.

    If you are so inclined you're welcome to join us for a day of riding in Parke County this October!
  3. reepicheep

    reepicheep Been here awhile

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    October sounds great to me. I'll be on the XB12XT (not the XB12X), so it will do even worse on the gravel than an SV (mainly because the SV will remain lighter :) ).
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  4. Bhuff

    Bhuff Adventurer

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    Reep. good to hear you will be there. Sounds like this could be an adventure. You know I am only about a half hour from you, maybe we could get JB to come down and take a day ride somewhere near us.
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  5. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    "Reep. good to hear you will be there. Sounds like this could be an adventure. You know I am only about a half hour from you, maybe we could get JB to come down and take a day ride somewhere near us."

    :thumb:thumb:thumb:thumb:thumb
  6. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    If you have taken a trip through this thread then you already know about Kip Kern and his beautiful vintage dirt bike restorations.

    He invited me to help him deliver two restorations to the Moto-Armory in East Moline, Illinois. When Kip sends an invite I always take advantage and this day did not disappoint. Up at 4:30, on the road at 5:30 to Kip's place and rolling towards East Moline at 0600 on the nose. He gave me a little insight as to whom I would meeting today and the significance of those people to the vintage dirt bike community and motorcycling at large. Many stories were told on the way as the morning brought us nearer to the Great Mississippi River and the Moto-Armory Museum.

    We have arrived! This is the Moto-Armory Vintage Off Road Motorcycle Museum. It is still under construction, so-to-speak. Not the building but the collection inside. I guess you would consider it a semi-private museum but soon to go public. The owner is a perfectionist to some degree and is organizing and filling this huge building with some of the finest and rarest motorcycles on the earth. When he and his team gets the place ready for consumption it will be open to the public but at this point you need an invitation to get inside these doors.

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    That's Rod Gorzny looking over Kip as he releases one of the two bikes from it's moorings. Rod is a fellow restorer and collector like Kip. They are both ex-miitary, Marines. They are good friends from the network of people in the vintage dirt bike community. They both do work for the owner of the museum and together they have numerous examples of their expertise inside.

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    Folks meet Tom Reese standing to the left and that's Kip holding the bike up. We delivered two very rare dirt bikes to Tom's collection today. For us who support the second amendment Tom's name should ring a bell. And, if his name doesn't, then maybe the name of his company will... Springfield Armory. Stands to reason why he calls the museum The Moto-Armory.

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    About the bike:

    1970 Jawa ISDT Banana Framed 402
    Only 21 ever built
    Only 6 known left in existence world-wide
    1 of only 2 left with the 402 motor
    1 of only 2 in the USA
    Cassette transmission
    Cassette crank/rod assembly(yes the crank and rod can be removed from the side of the motor which enables roadside-rebuilds while in competition)
    This bike competed in the 1969 ISDT
    Found in a barn hayloft just a few miles from Kip's home

    What are the chances? I mean, really?

    That's (L-R)Kip, Tom Reese, Rod Gorzny. Standing in the foreground with the Kiwi Indian shirt is Ray Sterns. Ray is Tom's right hand man. Ray oversees the the organizing, detailing, restoration, auction purchasing, cataloging and so many other functions at the museum. Ray is a racer, restorer, collector and has a vast wealth of knowledge. I hung with Ray most of the day while observing the millions of bytes of information being transferred from the restorer to the owner and steward of one of the largest motorcycle collections on earth. I didn't know it at this point but I was about to hit sensory overload.

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    Follow me. I know the history of this Jawa well and followed it from the time Kip pulled it out of the hayloft, through all stages of restoration until it was finished. I cut free of the conversation and headed out to photograph the first floor of the museum. I've been told there's almost 700 motorcycles here. Let's just see.

    Stay tuned.
  7. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Wow! You really had a great day of it!
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  8. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Joel - Hang on man, it only gets better but yes indeed, a great day it was. :thumbup

    The lower level is made up of three large rooms with some offices to the side and a smaller room tucked between room 1 & 2.

    In the foyer this 1910 Flying Merkel greets you. If a glance at this bike doesn't stir an emotion or two then you are probably in the wrong place. :deal

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    Suspended over the front desk and to the side of the staircase is this beautiful 1970 Jawa Speedway bike. This is just about as raw as you can get in a motorcycles. Engine, frame, wheels, handlebars and a throttle. Hang on.

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    The front room is where the Jawa will set along with some of the other of the rarest bikes in the collection. For right now it is just hanging out in the aisle in the general vicinity of its new location.

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    I had a 1969 175cc version of this 250. This bike is a little over-restored, almost to the point of perfection(Look at the reflection in the hubs and side cases!). But damn, does it ever look nice! :thumb

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    Can I ride it just one time?

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    And rare sometimes also means oddities like this Trophy.

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    Okay Wildebeest90210 and Jaglite take a look. I think there are a total of 9-10 Rickman/Metisse bikes in the museum and not sure how many more there might be. This one is brand-spanken new, never started, vintage, NOS, turnkey Rickman Metisse. The nickel looks dull because it still has the coating that was sprayed on it for shipping.

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    As you can see the one next to it is a restored bike and even though they are similar the untouched bike has a larger front tire(21") and a significantly beefier from fork. I know there were turn-key bikes and kit bikes. Not sure which the restored one might be but the color looks off compared to the virgin bike.

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    These are 2/3 scale replica bikes. They have a Chinese built 2-stroke motor in what starts out as a 20" bicycle. They are built like new then aged and weathered to resemble a running barn-find bike. Tom has the Cyclone, Indian and Flying Merkel versions. I think a lot of collectors and riders tend to offed at clone bikes. I am kind of on the fence and one part of me says "why?". Then you consider that real vintages of these bikes are astronomical in price and there are very few remaining examples. For the builder and the buyer they represent the passion we all have for motorcycling.

    Note: I missed several groupings of trials bikes, military bikes, drag bikes and street bikes on the lower level. One I was glad to see accidentally get captured is the 250 Elsinore in that center office. It is a never started, never ridden, completely virgin bike. Compared to the over-restored Yamaha you begin to appreciate the fit and finish of the Hondas from this generation. The Elsinore is not only new but flawless. I should have kept note of my place in the museum to track what bikes I had shot. But at this point I was like a bumble-bee in a fruit jar. :fpalm

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    Here's a better shot of the replica bikes. They are very well done and very convincing they are a lot older than they really are. However, I wasn't shooting them in this image but rather the 500 Moto-Guzzi single. It's a custom bike which is an odd bike to customize in the late 60's... unless you are Von Dutch. He built this bike and it was his daily rider for years. Next to it is a rare Greeves and then another XR and then an original paint Bicentennial Night Train and on and on and on.

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    In the room called the Hall of Champions is an ultra-rare ESO. Drool. But wait, what is that on the other side?

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    Does anyone ever really get tired of seeing Rickman/Metiesse bikes?

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    And then there is this bike. And the other bikes in this row too for that matter, but this bike. Check back at a later date... :hmmmmm

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    Okay, let's head up stairs and I'll try to do a better job of not missing so many bikes.

    Stay tuned.
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  9. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    This painting caught my eye as I headed for the stairway. It's an original, not a print. I had a 1909 Thor single. This is a twin but it's hard to mistake their logo even from many feets away.

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    At the top pf the stairwell there is a grouping of Harley-Davidson dirt bikes. I don't ever remember seeing this color combo on an MSR100. I've owned several but all of mine were the traditional black with silver fenders.

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    And a 250 moto-cross bike in nearly the same color of orange.

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    I certainly don't remember this option. Was it a dealer-promo? Is it a factory custom? Is it a customized bike done by a previous owner? It has a chrome tank and fenders, chrome engine side-covers, chrome expansion chamber and a black alligator seat. :scratch Next trip here I hope to find the back-story. For now I am just happy staring at it. Note the black Baja with silver fenders in the background. That's exactly how my '72 was when I bought it new.

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    To the left of the Harleys are two small rows of Huskys. This is the most numerous brand in this huge collection. Note a row of Pentons lining the row of windows in the background.

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    Then, there is an even bigger double-row of Husky's to left of the first grouping.

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    How's about a row of Hondas, very nice Hondas?

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    Hodakas anyone?

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    How about another grouping of Rickmans hiding at the end of a row of multiple brands of bikes?

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    This hillclimber belongs to Ray Sterns. Ray was the guy downstairs with the Kiwi Indian shirt. Ray won many hill-climbs and championships on this bike and it nearly killed him a couple of times. It looks wicked just setting there. The photos in the foreground are of when he first built the bike and started hill-climbing. That is a handmade, chrome-moly-oil-in-frame just like the stock frame only stronger and lighter.

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    If you remember Kip and I hauled up two bikes and an empty trailer. Tom has several bikes at the warehouse that he wants Kip to restore. All of the bikes at the warehouse will eventually be a part of this museum. At this point, just in my head, I am thinking we've seen about 400 or so bikes, maybe more. Many of the groupings and rows I neglected to shoot. I'll do better next time but I think from some of the shots you can get a feel for how extensive and deep Tom's collection is. :freaky

    Off to the warehouse to load the trailer and the van... and overload our senses once again.

    Hop in and stay tuned!
  10. TheBuelligan

    TheBuelligan Adventurer

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    Awesome thread JB2! I am just south of Greenwood. This motivates me to get around and explore other parts of Indiana!
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  11. 1stgenfarmboy

    1stgenfarmboy The Sherpa Man

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    I am way south of Moline, but I will be keeping an ear to the ground for the opening of this, I can make it a two-fer as I want to see the John Deere grounds also.


    It looks like it could take me a while to walk through that.
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  12. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    The trip to the warehouse was an unexpected surprise for Kip and I. The bikes here are from several collections Tom had recently purchase. He, Ray and crew were cataloging, tagging every bike, every used part and every NOS part. It would seem to most an unsurmountable task. Daunting. But they are and with great detail. Each bike is tagged and recorded, that's the red tags. Then each bike is tagged with a white tag for the needed repairs. Some bikes only require some minor repairs and detailing before taking a trip over to the museum to it's permanent home. All of that is handled in-house by Ray Sterns. Other bikes need anything from a mild restoration to a complete restoration. Those bikes are tagged to go to different niche' restorers like Kip. Tom had more bikes for Kip to do than he could haul home.

    Ray and I started clearing paths for the selected units while Tom and Kip sorted through the inventory to choose which ones. I got separated from my camera for an hour or so and found it just as we were ready to leave. I only got a few shots inside but you can see how overwhelming the job is that lies ahead for Tom and his crew.

    The bike that I had my heart on getting to know a little better was the club racer with the #3 plate on the front. It's a bevel-drive Ducati single converted into a cafe styled club racer. It was gorgeous! However, the shadows were starting to get long and the pace of the mission picked up significantly. You can't tell from this shot but it was nearly perfect. Tires still had nibs, the paint was a deep, cherry-red pearl and flawless. The only thing it needs is a lighting kit, a license plate and my name on the title! :lol3

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    This Kawasaki caught my attention not because there are so few street bikes in the entire collection but because of what this bike represented to motorcycle drag racing. I remember going to the Summer Nationals in 1972 and every drag bike there was either a Sportster or a big twin. There were only a few Triumphs still running that year. In 1973 there was almost not a Harley or a Triumph to be found but rather these, many of these. Times had changed. A lot.

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    I've always loved the old Ariels and there are a few spattered about in this room. The funny thing is that we took back the yellow dirt bike sitting next to it for Kip to restore. It is an early 70's Cooper. The Cooper was made in Mexico and was powered by a Spanish engine. Very few of these were imported to the USA and mostly just in the Southwest. It's not so much rare as it is rare to be in this country.

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    How about some vintage European street bikes? All of these are waiting their turn for a restoration and a new life.

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    One last look before I have to set this camera down and help Ray move bikes. You know, the ones Tom and Kip picked out are buried deep. :lol3

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    After a day with Tom and Tom's crew it is easy to grasp their dedication and passion for preserving this facet of motorcycling history. His passion for bikes is only equaled to his passion for guns and the second amendment. He quoted a stat several times that day saying that 88% of those who ride dirt are gun-owners and enthusiasts. He should know.

    I'd like to say that I went to East Moline and all I got was a lousy t-shirt but the t-shirt is too cool to throw under the bus with a statement like that.

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    Saying a t-shirt was all I got would also have not been the truth. More to come...

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    The day is getting late and we have miles to travel before we get back home. Having said that, we're headed up the road and across the Great Mississippi River to visit another place. The adventure is not quite over so jump in, we've got one more stop to make.

    Stay tuned.
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  13. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    So our next stop was at AA. No, not that AA. This AA... Antique Archaeology.

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    Kip and I have never met Mike or Frank or Dannielle but we both have mutual friends with them and was hoping to catch them here for a chance meeting. The place was packed and I felt lucky to have even got this shot. None of the folks we wanted to meet were there but we did talk with the staff and bought a few more t-shirts.

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    There is a ton of photo opportunities inside both buildings but today was all about the bikes... and the people.

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    I learned a lot today. At times I think we were both on information overload. It's hard to keep up with Tom but we were rewarded well for our efforts with friendships, information and a few goodies to boot.

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    We had 344 miles from here before calling it a day. A total of 688 miles in the wind(shield). Yep, I would have much preferred to ride the bike instead of the van but it wasn't that kind of day. We got a lot deeper into the sport today than "just riding".

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    Kip and I talked about the new friends, new opportunities and all the stuff we had seen. We talked about old friends who had passed and old friends who were getting older... like us. We talked about road trips and racing. We talked about growing up and growing old. It was a day that will take many days just to soak it in and remember it all. In a blur it was almost 1:00 am as I pulled the F150 out of Kip's drive, ears ringing from the roaring silence. I pinched myself... it has been a great day to be alive.

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    Stay tuned!

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  14. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Well there hasn't been a lot of Day Trippin' since my last post here but every day has been breath, eat, sleep, repeat motorcycles. I sold the KLR about the time of my last post. The intent was to purchase all of the parts to finish the Brutus project and start riding it as my primary ride. I sold the bike, bought the parts and about the time I was rolling on the Honda I got an opportunity to do work for a museum in East Moline, IL called the Moto-Armory. One thing led to another and pretty soon Winter is over, Spring is knocking on the door and I still don't have the Honda done. Well, there's only one way to cure that issue and that's to go out and buy 10 bikes.... right?

    Actually I bought a really clean little Honda Rebel on a Mechanics Lien. In the same week I had found a couple of salvage bikes at Lost Valley Auto Salvage that I wanted to buy. The place had been closed for nearly 20 years and a father/son pair bought the property and wanted to get rid of all the bikes. Couldn't buy two, I had to buy the whole lot. I hesitated at first but when they told me I could have them all for a few hundred bucks I was on it like a duck on a June-bug.

    Here's the Rebel. I put a new battery, a tune up/oil change, chain & sprockets, a set of mirrors and a good detailing job then plated and insured the bike. The plan was to ride it around until I got Brutus done and sold all the unwanted bikes from the Lost Valley purchase. It didn't take long to figure out the Rebel wasn't going to fill the void and so I listed it on Craig's. I sold it to a college freshman who planned on using it as her primary transportation while in college. She was happy, I was happy, I made a little cash off the deal and sold it to her under market value. Good karma all the way around.

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    Here's a few of the bikes. Actually these three are sold but the new owner won't be picking them up until after Labor Day. But soon, they will be gone.

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    The CB350 on the far left and the CB450K in the foreground are the only two I wanted out of the savage yard. Project bikes that I will stow away in the shed until I have time to work on them.

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    You may have noticed that there were some parts scattered about the garage in the prior photos. They are the sum-total of two restorations; a 1938 NSU 250 and a 1948 Triumph 350T DeLuxe. They belong to one of the curators at the Moto-Armory. Again, customer work comes first so it looked like Brutus would never get finished and is still in limbo as I write.

    Here's the 1948 Triumph minus the rims and gas tank just before I delivered them last week. There are a ton of parts to these old bikes. Note the two-piece rigid frame.

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    Here's the tank with only the stripes in the bib area done. There are scallops that go on the sides of the tank. On my next trip back to East Moline I will take some shots of the bike almost completed.. The stripes are hand painted BTW and the finish is Imron Jet Black, single-stage polyurethane. There is no better way to achieve a "real black" unless it's done in single-stage. Once you clear-coat it, it takes away from the natural beauty of just plain black.

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    So in my trips back and forth to Tom Wood Powersports in Anderson there was this bike that kept winking at me, trying to entice me into looking closer. I read up on them and the moto-pundits wrote horrible reviews on them. Said it was a parts-bin bike, not a real Scrambler. Hell, it was such a flop Yamaha didn't even offer it after the first year of production. You wouldn't believe all the crap they said about them. But I also read the owner's reports posted here and the folks who actually own them, love them. I liked it even more. A misfit bike that nobody likes with all kinds of small problems and quirks. Sounds like my kind of bike. Like back when I used to ride rigid mounted Sportsters and rubber-mounted Buells.

    So, with some of the inventory sold out of the shop and one of the restorations delivered I pulled the trigger on a left-over 2017 Yamaha Scrambler, SCR950 to be exact. It was supposed to rain all day but I didn't care. I told my wife that it would get wet going home in the truck so I might as well ride it, right? 43 miles of pouring down rain was a good way to start a relationship with a new misfit motorcycle. Seemed almost appropriate.

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    I thought I was going to outrun the storm between bands of rain but that didn't happen and I did not take a rain suit. Oh well, I was born wet. We all are. After returning home I let the new bike set out in the rain for 20 minutes to rinse off while I changed out of my rain-soaked clothes. I have to say the ride home was spectacular. I couldn't wipe the grin off my face. It sounds awesome and has that low-end torque you can only get from a v-twin. The thing isn't afraid or ill-mannered in the rain one bit. Braking was predictable and smooth. I am not a fan of Bridgestone tires but the Trail-Wings did just fine. Of course they are new and it is Bridgestones, after some miles, that I do not like. My past experience with them have been that the traction seems to go away quickly and they start to cup badly after about half-life. So, maybe a different brand when it's time to change? Or not, I'll see how they wear.

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    There were things I noticed that needed changed or modified right away. The first thing is that orange sticker on the gas tank. And no, it did not give up easily.

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    But eventually I won.

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    Now the passenger pegs. It is a solo bike and will never be a good two-up bike. So why the pegs? The bolts were long enough to pass through the peg bracket and the side cover mount but went into a bottom thread so it ran out of thread before they got tight against the mount. I thought about cutting down the bolts or ordering a shorter set so that I could retain the originals if I ever wanted to put them back on the bike. But then I remembered that I have a nice assortment of spacers and painted up four of the correct size and thickness to make it go back together without the rear pegs.

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    While I had the side covers off I discovered a huge storage area under the seat. There's enough room to store a rainsuit and an extra pair of gloves that is easy to get to. The side cover currently has one screw and two "tab & slot" brackets holding it. I think I will change the screws out to Dzus fasteners(1/4 turn with folding loop) so that it's even more accessible to take advantage of the gifted storage. Add a small bag made of ballistic nylon to store the suit in and viola!

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    The next thing was to remove the Yamaha logo from the rear fender. To tell you the truth I didn't even catch it there until I was wiping it down this afternoon. Anyways, it went goodbye without a fight...

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    ... and was replaced with this. Dad would have loved this bike.

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    Man, you gotta admit the bike looks better already without the passenger pegs and brackets. Five pounds lighter too. Next is adjusting the handlebars and removing the reflectors. I'll have to work on it between coats of paint on restoration projects but it gives me an excuse to ride it every time I change something, Right?

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    I have also soaked up a ton of new music with all the hours I have been putting in the shop. Here's one that seems appropriate. I really do not have a motorcycle problem. I really don't.

    Colter Wall is an up and coming singer/songwriter and I fell in love with his music. Turn it up.



    Stay tuned!
  15. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Going to be fun watching you farkle this one.

    Nice that you have a storage area on the bike.
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  16. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

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    Joel - The storage isn't much but just enough for a rainsuit and gloves. Two things you need to carry at all times but now I don't have to find a place for them. Hepko-Becker makes a cool luggage rack that sits just above the small area of the seat reserved for the passenger. It's not very wide though so I'll be fabricating my own version of their design. A good skid plate is in order and they are available at a decent price. I'm not a fan of clear lenses so everything will get painted the appropriate colors; red on the back lenses, amber on the fronts. I need about an inch lower on the seat to be really comfortable at stops. The Corbin will give me that but it's a little pricey so it will have to wait a while. Bar-ends and a different style of grips. Of course the Buell flyscreen painted to match. I think that's about it(you know this is bullshit). I had contemplated a color change but damn, I really like the gray. On the Scrambler thread they say the gray is the faster color so gray it stays. One thing for sure is that you and I won't see ourselves coming and going on these odd bikes. Maybe in 20 years they'll be as valuable as a Banded Clovis?

  17. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

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    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    Sounds like we better hope they never are. Didn't turn out well for either the singer or Jesse!

    Aren't you the one that talked me out of the bar ends I had on the SV? Surprises me that you want to put some on. :)

    I have some Napoleon-style bar ends that I'll never use. First thing to hit the ground if things go sideways.

    Welcome to them if you want them. I also have a set of the round style. They were on the SV when you rode it. Can have either set. I'll PM some pictures of them in a bit.

    If you had the time you could make a fair amount of change fabbing metal skid plates for the Triumph. Nobody has brought one to market and a lot of riders are looking to replace the plastic one that comes on the bike--me included.

    Thought about getting my flyscreen painted to match, but the black looks okay with the amount of black there is on the front.

    How did you get on with the airbox? I sat on one at Dreyer after you mentioned that you were thinking about getting one. Liked everything except the way the airbox hit my right knee.
    JB2 likes this.
  18. JB2

    JB2 Dirt Of The Earth

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,411
    Location:
    Edge of The Great Plains
    Joel - No, it wasn't me. I've had bar ends on almost every bike I have owned. Musta been someone else. I was trying to talk you out of expandable luggage because the rain covers only fit when the pieces are fully expanded.

    The airbox was not an issue but the right peg and brake pedal will take some getting used to.

    If I had a shear and a brake fabbing up skid plates would be a nice little sideline to restorations but I can buy the one for the Yamaha for $119.00. That's a good price and hard to beat if you can't mass produce. One at a time would probably be twice the price.
    merc16 likes this.
  19. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,153
    Location:
    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    Now you have me trying to remember who did talk me into going back to the lollipop mirrors.

    If I were to use a set of these I'd go with the Napoleon style. They sit higher and are closer to the position of the stock mirrors on the Triumph. The round ones worked well, but you really have to take your eyes off the road longer to use them.

    The only expandable luggage I have is the tank bag and I don't use it much except on longer rides. Makes me worry about the paint and I'm still in the "DON'T SCRATCH IT" phase with my first brand new bike. :lol3
    JB2 likes this.
  20. radianrider

    radianrider Adventurer wanna'be

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,153
    Location:
    Avon, IN If we never go, we will never know
    Ahhh! The light dawns!

    When you said "bar-ends" my brain added "mirrors." :fpalm

    Never mind.
    JB2 likes this.