Mosko Moto Soft Bags for Offroad & Dualsport

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Sideoff, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. flynnair

    flynnair Been here awhile

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    You can lead the second strap out the hole for the tie down bar. It may or may not help.
  2. D-Train

    D-Train Dusty Wessels

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    Good conversation guys! I watched the video as well. I don't have an R80 V2 in front of me just yet nor do I have a 701 but I concur with this that the stability (or lack of) in the case of the R80 is the side plastics are different on the 701 than other bikes. As some of you have stated, there are different mounting positions which allow the leg to hang at different angles. This will help a bit with certain things but in this case I agree that it is the side plastics keeping the legs on the R80 from mounting like the R40.
  3. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    I guess you could always epoxy some shaped foam to the inner leg on that side...

    The Moskos are really sweet... maybe you should consider selling the 701 and get something that fits the bags better.
  4. MultiDoc

    MultiDoc Been here awhile

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    Sorry to interrupt the fitting debate. Just wanted to say a big thanks to Mosko, just received the bags and plan on test-installing them this weekend. Need to clean the bike first, still muddy after last weekend.
    Will post pics once done.
    Any tips in advance on mounting the R80 on a Superenduro with the CJ designs rack and KTM side bars ?
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  5. 70East

    70East Been here awhile

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    Maybe you are going to have to put on some sort of small rack to keep them from flopping.
  6. Matt_Mc

    Matt_Mc Long timer

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    So my Scout 60's came in ! :happay

    First impressions, these are very well made bags.

    I stuffed one as full as I could get it and only got 2 rolls down before out of space for any more. It's absolutely as full as you would ever want it to be.

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    And I can still get into the panniers.
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    So what's in the bag ? A full sized summer bag, a thick blanket and a super thick and heavy moving blanket !

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    If you are worried about the shoulder strap flopping, pull out a good amount of strap, fold it over on itself and tuck it into the shoulder pad.
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    Then you can put your straps or beavertail over top and I highly doubt it will ever move or flap around. When you go to take it off just pull the strap and it will unravel to where it was before, no fussing with the slider or anything.
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    I have a Pillion going with me so 2 bags are in order. I found that you can remove the beavertail from the bottom bag, remove the straps for the beaver tail to the top bag and then use the bottom straps and top beavertail to hold both bags together. Doing it this way the bottom bag is strapped to the bike and the top bag is strapped to the bottom. They are NOT going anywhere like this. I am using two 1" ROK straps to hold the bottom bag onto the bike. I also have two 1/2" ROK straps from the top bag down to the passenger foot pegs for a little more support since she'll be using it as a back rest. The smaller straps are connected to the holders for the shoulder strap. I don't really think they are needed but I tossed them on anyway as it can't hurt anything.


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    The excess strapping from the ROK straps fits nicely into the roll up straps on the bag as well. If the velcro wasn't long enough you could just buy some more and make it fit for your application but it works perfect on mine.

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    The map/molle pocket is super nice. I don't think I've ever seen a zip lock that big and thick before. It actually took some effort to open and close the zip lock on it and you can tell the plastic is super thick and pliable.

    The bad ?

    Nothing really except that I would change the map/molle pocket and straps to Male/Female connectors on it instead of double male/double female. With the bags filled and stacked like this there's just no room under the beavertail for anything else. With the m/f straps you could double them up to allow for more room if you're running 2 bags like me. Not that I need anything more piled on top acting like a sail but....
    So far I really like what I see. :beer
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  7. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

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    I've a 2015 690 Enduro and was really displeased with the R80V2's initial "floppy" fit others have experienced on their Husky 701s. The holster leg straps were initially placed in the passenger peg bracket just ahead of the passenger peg (similar to a 701 owner earlier in the thread. The result was very floppy. I then moved the holster straps to the frame as shown below. Notice, too, this causes an odd bow in the center piece near the rear of the seat. Again, very floppy.

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    The fix is unfortunate, but necessary. You must remove your rear passenger foot pegs, which I love to use on long slab trips. In the below pic you'll see the holster strap is now close to vertical. It suddenly makes the system quite taut and eliminates the above mentioned bow.

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    I won't be sure for awhile if it's worth losing my rear pegs to run the R80V2, but this gas tank cutout is a huge improvement on my previous solution!

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  8. Matt_Mc

    Matt_Mc Long timer

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    Drill a hole in the upper section of the foot peg bracket and add a 1" webbing mounting plate. You can then put your pegs back on. They cost a dollar or two depending on where you get them from.

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  9. flynnair

    flynnair Been here awhile

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  10. dvwalker

    dvwalker Working to ride

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    re-post for mosko inmates, 701 r80 w/no flobby. can't wait to head out for a multi-day trip..

    Attached Files:

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  11. Shawnee Bill

    Shawnee Bill Long timer Supporter

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    I think for the R-80 to be secure on the 701 there needs some kind of minimal rack to provide an additional tie point so three tie downs could be used to triangulate the forces. I think it has to do with the larger bulk (and mass) of the R-80 as compared to the R-40.

    I was wondering what I was going to do tomorrow, I'm not much of a metal worker and shouldn't be getting into building a rack but why not? I have some conflicts that are keeping me from going on any rides for a while, might as well try to make myself useful?
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  12. Shawnee Bill

    Shawnee Bill Long timer Supporter

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    Just saw theofam's post about removing the passenger pegs and using that as tie down point, I was looking at that yesterday but wasn't wanting to remove those pegs, probably try that as a second tie point tomorrow.
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  13. snooker

    snooker AttitudeIsEverything

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    Heat protection:
    I've used various ThermoTec heat protection products to protect my GL Great Basin.
    I used the ThermoTec sleeves to slip over lower mounting straps that go near my exhaust:
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    I wanted to say that the sticky back sheets could work but besides the fact they tend to peel off (especially riding in off road harsh conditions), I also wanted others to realize the 2000 F degree rating is for RADIANT heat so I would not expect them to work if you have a bag actually contacting a hot exhaust. There needs to be an air gap. I think the CONDUCTIVE rating is like 750 F degrees which is still a lot but doubt the sheets are thick enough to allow direct contact to the exhaust.

    Back when I couldn't find a decent heat shield, I installed a silicone trivet (pad for plates of hot food) directly onto my exhaust for protection. The advantage is they are big, thin, totally flexible and cuttable and can go places other shields may not fit. I've run this setup under my bag for years, with the edge of my bag sitting on it:
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  14. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

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    Great tip - thanks!
  15. Didado

    Didado Long timer

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    Your pics are invisible
  16. theofam

    theofam Been here awhile Supporter

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  17. RedlandDoug

    RedlandDoug Adventurer

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    Just ordered a set and was wondering if anyone had pictures of how they sit on a XR650L?
    Really excited and thanks! to local guys doing great stuff. Can't wait for the brown truck to show up!
  18. dvwalker

    dvwalker Working to ride

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    thanks, edited post and attached the pics
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  19. Sideoff

    Sideoff Been here awhile

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    Hi All -

    This week's Mosko Moto blog entry is on a slightly unrelated topic. I debated whether to even post it here, because I don't want to hijack the dialog and start a tangent about satellite communicators, which is a topic that's been well-covered elsewhere. But at the same time: this was an interesting experience, it happened, and maybe it can save some headaches for other folks down the road. We have LOTS of updates on other Mosko stuff coming up in the next entry too. So I apologize in advance for this digression.

    I know a lot of you already carry an InReach and I thought you might be interested in our experience with the SOS button. We currently have two Mosko team members laid-up with broken feet: Dusty (D-Train) in Colorado, who's going in for surgery on Tuesday, and Ashley here in White Salmon, who is hopefully not going to need surgery. So this topic is very much on our minds at the moment.

    The weekend before last Ashley & I were riding in Eastern Oregon on some dirt tracks we'd never been on before. We were exploring. It was beautiful riding: challenging and fun. It was an epic weekend.

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    On Sunday Ashley had a crash, the kind that happens all the time, nothing catastrophic. In this case the bike landed on her foot, crushing it between a rock and the bike, and breaking some bones. It also broke her clutch lever at the pivot point, disconnecting it from the bike. She tried to ride but with a broken foot, rocky terrain, and no clutch, it just wasn't working.

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    We both had Reckless 80s on our bikes. We consolidated into one set of bags, taking water, empty water bottles, water filter, tent, warm clothes, one sleeping bag, and all the remaining food. Everything else we left, including the bike. We marked a GPS waypoint for the bike and stashed our gear out of sight under a nearby rock, the one on the left in the pic below. A cool thing about the R80 I hadn't really thought about before: it's super easy to consolidate gear in an emergency, since all the bags are interchangeable.

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    We rode two-up for a while. The flat/sandy parts were no problem. The elevated rocky ridges were impossible to climb/descend with a passenger, so Ashley hiked those parts while I rode with the gear. Once we crossed a ridge she would get back on the bike and we'd continue riding. In the pic below, you can kind of see that about 100 feet behind Ashley, there's a big elevation drop she'd just finished hiking.

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    We covered about 6 miles in a few hours traveling this way. Ashley hiked about 1.5 miles with her broken foot, through the steepest parts. The pain was getting bad, plus it was hot out, and we didn't have a ton of water. Ashley was exhausted, she toppled over into the bushes a few times. She wasn't going to make it further on foot. I could see on my GPS that we had another 6 miles as the crow flies before we reached a familiar dirt road, and we weren't sure how many more ridges we'd have to cross to reach it. Riding or hiking 6 miles out is no biggie... but with a broken foot, it's a problem.

    We decided to get some help. Either I'd ride on ahead alone, or we'd hit the SOS button on the InReach and see what happened. After some discussion, we decided the point of either option was to get in touch with Search & Rescue, and the SOS button seemed like a faster and safer way, since splitting up came with its own set of risks.

    We hit the InReach SOS button at 2:38 PM. They responded immediately. We described the situation and asked if they could help. Answer: yes. Ashley's pain was an 8 out of 10. No trees for shade, so we setup the tent rain-fly, removed Ashley's boot, and stabilized her leg. You can see our shade encampment off in the distance below. It was hot.

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    In 30 minutes we got an InReach message saying Search & Rescue was on their way. At 5:51 a BLM Ranger and Sheriff arrived in lifted trucks. They had difficulty finding us due to the large amount of unmarked double-track. The BLM Ranger who arrived first, Patrick, splinted Ashley's foot, which helped a lot with her pain. 30 minutes later Search & Rescue arrived in a UTV with an air-cushioned litter.

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    By 7:45 PM Ashley reached a real ambulance on a graded road on her way to the nearest hospital, about 60 miles away. An hour later she was at Lakeview ER.

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    The InReach worked flawlessly. All the BLM Rangers and Search & Rescue personnel were wearing them too. They said they wished more people would carry them in the backcountry, because it saves the rescue team a lot of time, effort, and frustration in coordinating an evacuation.

    This was my second - and hopefully my last - experience with a medevac. This time it was Ashley who was rescued, last time it was me in Honduras. This time we had an InReach, last time I was carrying a SPOT, which wasn't much help due to the lack of two-way communication, and the lack of a reliable search & rescue infrastructure in Honduras. Having two-way communication is invaluable, both for the person writhing around in pain, and also for the first-responders who are trying to find them. For the rescued: it's awesome to know that you're not alone, help is on the way. For the rescuers: they know exactly what they're dealing with, what kind of vehicle to bring, and what trauma supplies they'll need.

    I take my InReach everywhere. Glad we had it. To all my friends and our extended Mosko family: I hope you'll get one and take it on all your adventures. That way we can keep doing cool shit until we're too old to walk, then sit around the fire telling stories.

    Huge thanks to Patrick and the BLM Rangers, Chuck and the Search & Rescue team, Dr. Gallagher and the awesome crew at Lakeview ER, and Jason with the Lake County Sheriff's office, who returned with me to fetch the bike, and who rode it out completely clutchless, suffering nothing more than torn pants and a bloody leg. That was an amazing feat of motorcycling (blurry cell phone pic below).

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    Sometimes people ask us why we put backpack straps on so many of our bags. Especially since many of us carry a hydration pack anyway. There are so many times when backpack straps have come in handy for me in the past. For example: when using rear tie-downs as a tow strap... going from my campsite into town to get groceries... a quick hike to a hot spring or lake with snacks, towels, trunks, etc... a bike break-down and I have to hop on a buddy's bike to ride out... as airline carry-on for international fly-to-ride trips... etc etc. Well here's another time they came in handy, the pic says it all :)

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    More updates on apparel and new bag sample next week!!
  20. Ladukebob

    Ladukebob Spaceark

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    Wow Pete! You got one tough girl there.
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