1. Adventure Rider Print Magazine!
    We're doing a print magazine this November - 128 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase a copy for $9. Limited copies still available.
    Dismiss Notice

Mosko Moto Soft Bags for Offroad & Dualsport

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by Sideoff, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. Cycle_Path

    Cycle_Path Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    858
    Location:
    North Bend, wa
    Hey Mosko, curious if there is a lag with 10L system? Placed order over weekend and wasnt sure how long to wait because we have had so many front door thefts lately
    TheGearDude likes this.
  2. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,345
    Location:
    Lost in the jungles of Thailand
    Greeeting all!! I have been sitting on the sidelines for a few years waiting for Mosko to design the soft luggage that I desperately wanted.

    I began with riding/racing off road in the California desert for years and it wasn't until I moved to Thailand in 2007 that I began camping off my dirt bikes - first a KTM 525 and now the 500 EXC. My first experience with luggage was DirtBags saddlebags.

    [​IMG]

    I didn't like the way the bags flapped about like a bloodhounds ears in full gallop. Hardly secure offroad. Then once Wachs and Harold at GiantLoop came up with the First Coyote I grabbed it. This was the first version, which you literally bolted it onto the bike. Since I'd used Voile straps for years for alpine skiing I just used those same Voile straps to mount the first generation Coyote.

    [​IMG]

    I stuck with different versions of the Coyote through the years until David Wachs left GL and produced his own bag named the Altrider Hemesphere.

    [​IMG]

    Much improved design - waterproof, easy mounting and dismounting - but I was still yearning for waterproof saddlebags in preference to the U shape of the Hemsiphere and Coyote. I wanted to be able to carry the camping and survival essentials for multiweek trips while still keeping the weight below seat level.

    Next step was the Kriega Overlander 30 - at last, a waterproof saddlebag.

    [​IMG]

    They failed miserably in the field.

    Here is a thread I penned outlining my experiences with each of those pieces of luggage, in case anyone is stuck at home and bored.

    https://advrider.com/f/threads/kriega-quick-review-overlander-30-vs-gl-coyote-and-dirt-bagz.911217/


    When Mosko came out with the R40 I was dead set on it. That is until I saw the amount of luggage that was stored under seat hieght versus above it. Since I am not your average bear at 5'5" and 140 pounds, I particularly enjoy the handling of my lightweight enduro bikes and I want to keep it that way. For myself, this means I want as much weight as possible carried low on the bike. The R40 carried about 7 Liters per side below the seat. My Altrider already carried much more below the seat level, so I crossed the R40 off my wishlist. Pic of Altrider sidepod and friends R40 side bag for comparison.

    [​IMG]


    If I can keep things from being mounted on the back of the seat it also makes it much easier for me to mount the bike as well (short legs, lack of gynmastic ability).
    I ended up making my own system to do what I wanted - that is, to carry 40 liters waterproof below the seat, rackless. My solution consisted of GL Mototrek panniers and a custom harness I fabbed up using leather, webbing, and some rigid plastic reinforcing rods .

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It worked fine in terms of egonomics and bike handling. However the Mototrek panniers are designed for the street bikes and not so much for the rigors of off roading - specifically, being crashed off road, and frequently. They are still holding up on a friends 690 riding off road in Laos and Cambodia so not as bad as I feared (although she claims only one low speed dirt nap and no proper crashes as yet), but realistically they will buckle under the amount of crashing I put things through.

    I chatted with people trying the version 1 and 2 of the R80 on KTM 500s and everyone, in private messages, advised against it since the width of the harness did not allow the R80 v1 or v2 to sit on the narrow 500 EXC properly, and as close to the body panels as I wanted. Now, bring on the v3 of the R80 and with the adjustable revolver side bags. This is what I had imagined. Well thought out gear, bombproof, and the desired 40L of carrying capacity below the seat height on each side.

    So I got the full R80 Revolver V3 and looked at how I could make this set up work for me. First step was yanking the 22L Stinger tail bag off. Thankfully I can use it on my Triumph Street Triple for multi day, hotel-staying street bike canyon rides.

    Next to hit the ground was the Beavertail. Here we are now with the V3 of the R80 devoid of 22 liter Stinger bag and beavertai.

    [​IMG]

    It can carry 40 liters below the seat height, even more since they are actually 22 liters per side. I can travel forever with less than 40L in SouthEast Asia. This includes all clothes, shoes, raingear, camping, cooking, eating, drinking, tools, spares etc. I am planning on taking the 500 to Northern Asia for a few months next year so will need warmer clothes and a few more spares. Therefore in the future - once I leave Southeast Asia - the R80 may be back in its original form, complete with Stinger and Beavertail.

    Lets first do a comparison of the Altrider hemisphere U shaped luggage that I have been using for the past 4 years. Since the GiantLoop Coyote is practically the same shape comparisons can be made to that model as well. This is how i travel with it throughout Southeast Asia, all gear packed for camping, cooking, and living off the bike for as long as I like.

    [​IMG]

    Typically it packs into less than 40 liters and that even includes my blooody CPAP machine. The Ushaped bags like the GL Coyote and Altrider Hemishere generally pack a portion of my load just above seat hieght. However the sidepods are kept nice and snug against the sidepanels of the bike. The complex curves of the U shaped bags is more complex to pack, however after doing it for years and years, one can get it down to pack pretty compact.

    The R80 V3 side bags are about 1.5" thicker than the sidepods of the Coyote/Hemisphere. They are also just over an inch wider. This makes the legs of the R80 hang down a bit farther than the sidelegs of the Coyote/Hemisphere over the bottom of the sidepanels.

    AltRider Hemishere

    [​IMG]

    Mosko Moto V3 R80

    [​IMG]


    The angle of the bags are also different when the R80 is in the #2 and #3 position. The sidebags are held more parrallel to the seat then the Altrider/ Coyote.


    Altrider Hemishpere

    [​IMG]

    Mosko Moto V3 R80

    [​IMG]

    Since the bags are designed for Adventure bikes and not slim waisted enduro bikes there is a gap when the bags are laid over the 2012-2016 KTM 500 bikes.

    This long aluminum tab pulls the bags away from the sidepanels.

    [​IMG]

    You would never notice this on wider ADV bikes but on the slimmer enduro bikes it makes itself apparent.

    Left side.

    [​IMG]

    Right side.

    [​IMG]



    The aluminum strap that is slid into the mount at the rear of the harness also forces the bag into a wider mount than needed. On an adventure bike for which this bag was made this is not an issue. When mounting to a narrower enduro bike it does not allow the bag to mount as flugh as it can.

    here are the aluminum tabs pulled out to where I want them to lay. Note the additional drop of the harness without the full length aluminum tabs.


    left side

    [​IMG]

    Right side.

    [​IMG]



    You can see how the tab keeps the bag from dropping an extra inch each side. By allowing the drop I am hoping for a closer more snug fit of the bags to the bike.

    So this is the first shop fitment of the bag to the bike. Need to load up and give it a few trial runs to see what else needs to be done to get the R3 Where I want it.

    The other option is to do what others have done (such as RTW Paul with the Globetrotting rack) with a Rear rack to space out the bags. That will work, however I have always enjoyed a rackless system and want to see if I cna make it work reliably on the bike as a stand alone rackless system.

    Stay tuned as we get to discivering what works and what doesn't.
  3. kubcat

    kubcat Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,796
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Nice write up - thank you. So are you going to run without the aluminum stays or bend them to line up with the position you want? If you run without them, will that increase stress and wear?
    TheGearDude likes this.
  4. TheGearDude

    TheGearDude Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2015
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    We are stoked to announce that the NEW Scout 30L Duffle is now available! (Formerly the Scout 25L) We went back to the drawing board and completely revamped this bag, loading it with every moto-specific feature we could think of. It quickly converts to a comfortable backpack, or an over the shoulder duffle, the choice is yours. A key feature is the rugged and fully removable beavertail stash spot, complete with two reinforced mesh pockets and plenty of extra webbing for max expansion. The Scout 30 works great as a standalone tail bag, a travel bag, or a pannier topper on hard boxes.
    Check it out for yourself: moskomo.to/Scout30
    3FA4662D-7AAD-4E46-9459-55B95D9684EA.jpeg
  5. TheGearDude

    TheGearDude Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2015
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    Great write-up, awesome to see the progression of your riding and luggage systems!

    MtnRider likes this.
  6. TheGearDude

    TheGearDude Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2015
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    Have you checked the tracking info? Shouldn't be any delays, our distribution is at 100%.
    Cycle_Path likes this.
  7. bananachunks

    bananachunks ride camp ride camp ride camp

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2013
    Oddometer:
    23
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I've been refreshing the Sold Out Scout 25L page several times a day for the last two weeks or so. What a pleasant surprise when this popped up today instead - I ordered immediately! Thank you!
    TheGearDude likes this.
  8. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,574
    Location:
    New Melbourne, Newfoundland
    Great writeup, I'm planning on getting a set of R80's to go on my 525 and 640. I have a narrow rack on the 525 so I can see the same width issues you're dealing with. Definitely interested in seeing what you come up with.
    TheGearDude likes this.
  9. kubcat

    kubcat Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,796
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    what is the group consensus on the pros/cons of backcountry 30 vs the scout 30?
    Ocho NA and TheGearDude like this.
  10. STLR

    STLR Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Oddometer:
    440
    Location:
    SoIL
    I've always been a much bigger fan of the Scout line due to its simplicity and top loading layout.
    I've only owned the BC40 though in the past, so have no hands on experience with the BC30.

    I'd like to add though that I really want to see what the Mosko team brings to the table with V2 of the BC duffles after what they did with the BC panniers.
    jowul and TheGearDude like this.
  11. OKDQ

    OKDQ Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,017
    Location:
    OK
    I have the Backcountry 30 and like everything from Mosko it is top notch quality and design. I have never liked end loading duffles, but I bought the BC30 anyway...turns out I'm still not a fan of end loading duffles which makes me interested in the new Scout 30 duffle for it's top loading.
    jowul and TheGearDude like this.
  12. TheGearDude

    TheGearDude Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2015
    Oddometer:
    560
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    Anyone picking up a new Tenere 700 here in North America soon? Our new Reckless 80 Revolver fits like a glove in case anyone was wondering...
    _DSC3412.jpg
    MzunguMoto and MtnRider like this.
  13. Cycle_Path

    Cycle_Path Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    858
    Location:
    North Bend, wa
    Of course I spoke too soon....if I only waited a couple hours. Just received it. thx
  14. kubcat

    kubcat Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,796
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    I have never had end loading duffles, but for all the reasons listed on the MM web page, they DO sound better suited to trailside bike camping. Can you and others comment on the specific reasons why you prefer the top loader over side loaders? Is there anyone here who does prefer the side loaders?
  15. OKDQ

    OKDQ Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,017
    Location:
    OK
    Probably it’s mostly learned habits/behavior, a casualty of being an old fart! Often I’ll want something out of the bag but will leave the bag strapped to the seat or rear rack so to peer into the bag while strapped down you have to bend down or get on a knee and I’m not that limber anymore (refer to old fart part of first sentence :rofl). And as you rout around thru the duffel stuff tends to want to fall out. Then there’s the other issue with being old, I can’t remember which end of the duffel a particular item is in so I invariably open the wrong end! I’ve thought about marking the ends to differentiate them.

    A duffel that opens at the top allows you to stand and peer into the duffel as you rout thru it to find items and stuff doesn’t tend to fall out. Anther important difference with a top loading duffel is that the opening is the entire length of the bag vs. just the shorter width on the end loaders. However, the design of the Scout duffel has the roll down neck tapered so you dont quite get the entire length of the bag as the opening but all other factors mentioned still apply.

    Apparently Mosko realizes different preferences by different people too by offering both designs, just one more reason Mosko is such a good company.
    TheGearDude and STLR like this.
  16. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,574
    Location:
    New Melbourne, Newfoundland
    I like the look of the new Scout 30, any daisy chain type loops on top to run your cinch straps through?
    TheGearDude likes this.
  17. Guoseph

    Guoseph Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Oddometer:
    653
    Location:
    Alameda, California
    Just found an older blog post where you guys mentioned 2 x 1.5L Primus bottles fit the holsters of the R10. Anyone have experience with this setup so far? How tight is the fit? Does the R10 come with a "leash" to keep the bottles from flying out? What do you do to keep the bottles from rubbing on each other too much?
    TheGearDude likes this.
  18. Nowwhat

    Nowwhat I'll Go Second... Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    Oddometer:
    9,112
    Location:
    On the Ground Laughing
    Gotta be Echo Canyon....you take the bikes up it too for fun?
    TheGearDude and AllSeasonRider like this.
  19. slink

    slink Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Oddometer:
    253
    Location:
    Estes Park, CO
    Do you have an ETA for the Woodsman pants?
    TheGearDude likes this.
  20. BenM721

    BenM721 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2020
    Oddometer:
    59
    Location:
    Monument, CO
    Any idea how far off the Nomax is? I want to pick up the Nomad but feel like I should wait.
    TheGearDude likes this.