Mosko Moto vs. Giant Loop

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by PropTP, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. PropTP

    PropTP Been here awhile

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    Im looking for soft luggage for my single-cylinder TT600R and ive narrowed it down to either the Mosko Moto Reckless 80 (80 litres) vs. Giant Loop Coyote (39 litre) + a Rogue drybag (17 litre). Ive never seen either in the flesh, so im looking for advice.

    The bags will be used for 1-4 weeks trips and hopefully for the epic Trans-Asia silk road trip in the future. Were talking everything from European asphalt touring to Morocco offroad, but realistically speaking, the majority of riding will be asphalt.

    The ideal system would sit as far back as possible on the bike, preferably over the fender. I tend to sit pretty far back on the seat, and do not want my luggage cramping my riding. Theres nothing worse for me, than wanting to slide back but being stopped by the luggage. My current set-up is a Kriega US-30. It practically sits on the rear fender, and is fine when im not camping. It wont fit cold-weather gear though.

    I like the Reckless 80s size and the setup looks much easier to pack than the Coyote. The beavertail looks really handy and it has the rear-facing storage pockets. Its quite a bit more expensive than the GL combo though. I dont how well it would sit (widthwise) on my bikes narrow rear fender though.

    The GL setup looks like it sits tighter on dual sports and i like how the Rogue straps onto the Coyote. I dont know if 56 litres in total is enough for camping gear, spare parts, oil, clothes, etc. I know how to pack minimalistic, but ill also be visting cities and would like to bring some regular items such as clothes/sneakers, etc. too.

    The GL Coyote/Rogue PLUS shipping would cost me around 426 USD, whereas the MM Reckless PLUS shipping would cost med 590 USD. Thats 164 USD more for the MM set-up.

    What do you guys think? To be honest, im sick and tired of looking at and researching gear. I just want to get out and ride. Soft-luggage is the last essential item im looking at.


    This is my current set-up with my Kriega US-30. Notice how far back it is, which is a perfect position for my riding style.
    [​IMG]


    Ideally the lugagge shouldnt pass the point where the "YA" is on the seat
    [​IMG]
    #1
  2. RetiredandRiding

    RetiredandRiding Retired to Ride Supporter

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    I looked at a LOT of luggage also and am now thrilled with my Mosko Moto Reckless 80 on my DRZ400. I also have the 40L Backpack. The system sits as far back as you want; the beavertail has a pocket for tent poles; the dry bags have a see-through window; it disconnects from the bike very quickly; and the exhaust shield is included. Add to that their extremely responsive customer service, and the extra expense was a no-brainer. Cool logo, too ;-)
    #2
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  3. snare

    snare sittin and breathin

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    I looked at GL and Mosko (looking forward to see the final design of their tankbag that is still in the works), I tried an Altrider Hemisphere Saddlebag Holster with my own drybags, and ended up with with a Green Chile Adventure Gear softrack. I chose their Hardcore soft rack that has built in support for bikes without super strong subframes. These supports are multi function, as they are also two 15" long tire irons.

    I like the simplicity, lightweight, and versatility of their softracks, such as : that I can carry a larger drybag on each side , like a 20 or 30 liter, when doing long multi week trips, or use a 10 or 5 liter bag for short day long trips. I use a couple of their Snake Kits to strap the dry bags to the sides of the rack. It is also easy to strap items/bags to the top of the rack.
    The rack is also modular and if a part of it gets damaged you only need to replace that part, not the whole rack.

    You can easily adjust the position of the rack , forward and back and put it right where you want it.

    Not sure if youve seen them yet, but may be worth a look.

    http://www.greenchileadv.com/
    gcagpic.jpg
    #3
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  4. This is this

    This is this n00b

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    #2 Mosko this gear is quality & versatile.... Reckless will compress for an overnight trip or handle 80l ...performed flawlessly 4000k trip on a sports bike nothing blew open or moved around... I found the fit is better on a DR650 luggage hugs the bike & beaver tail offers easy access to your gear, ear plugs, tyre gauge pump etc ...good design tough & lightweight

    Attached Files:

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  5. PropTP

    PropTP Been here awhile

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    I stumbled across them, but went on as i didnt quite get it at the time. But its basically a lashing system right? So with a softrack i can for example fit 2 Kriega Us-30s as side-panniers with no problems whatsoever?
    #5
  6. snare

    snare sittin and breathin

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    It is a lashing system. As far as kreiga US-30s, I do not know what their attachments are like, but I suspect they can be be attached to the soft rack.

    To show a bit about how the system works, here are a couple videos :

    The Snake Kit in this video is what i use to strap drybags to the side straps of the softrack. It can also be used for a top bag as shown.


    #6
  7. bomber60015

    bomber60015 Hold fucking fast Supporter

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    I really like my Reckless 80s . . . . . . .pic show em way over packed
    IMG_2955.JPG

    THey are bombproof, waterproof (in the dry bags), and can be positioned pretty much where you wish. The center section may be a bit wide for your scoot, though. Two minutes with a ruler and Mosko's site with answer that. They are a bit more fiddly to pack than hard luggage, but don't move no matter how you ride.

    I just saw a Green Chile set up over the weekend. I was very impressed. More options and flexibility than Mosko (basically limited by your imagination), but the lack of fixed locations time after time would slow my packing/unpacking. For some, though, I can see that it would be the answer to a prayer (specially smaller scoots).
    #7
  8. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    I like to use my full seat as well. I'm also one of the rare birds (silent minority?-gotten a handful of emails with the same conclusion) that just knew I was going to hate that big massive clump pushing me into my tank bag all day on the R80, so I sold them off after mounting a gajillion times. Admittedly, I never used them on the road, but just because I knew they wouldn't work for me. I'd be hesitant, considering your first post. Also, they are extremely well built, bombproof bags, but there is a lot of strap redundancy, adding to their complexity. I would've cut 10 straps off if I remember right that just weren't needed at all. YMMV.
    #8
  9. bfly

    bfly Adventurer

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    I've been using the GL Great Basin since it came out. It is a sturdy bag and works well, but...

    - Due to its shape, it is awkward to pack.
    - The outer bag is just waterproof enough to keep water IN the bag once it has seeped in.

    I am going to give the Reckless 80 a try this year and see how it works.
    #9
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  10. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator Super Supporter

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    I have used and abused a number of different Giant Loop setups. I had one of the original Great Basins. It was great for desert riding, but would not keep things dry in the rain. This was one of the ORIGINAL bags from ~2008 and they have since gone to a roll-top closure. I don't remember how, but I was one of the first GL users and when they came out with the new design with the flap over the zipper, they sent me a new model (~2010).

    I have since purchased a GL Coyote (~2012). It has also been great in the desert, but not so much in the rain. My last ride had rain 5/6 days. I knew this before I started the ride, so I packed what I needed to keep dry in Osprey dry bags. There was a puddle of water on the bottom of each leg of the bag at the end of the rainy days. Water crossings cause a similar result. Packing my sleeping bag and clothes in the dry bags kept them dry.

    At the end of that trip, I was a little frustrated with how difficult it was to close the zippers, especially in cold weather. I was also frustrated whenever I needed to get in and out of the bag for things like warmer gloves. My hands had to be near frostbite before I would finally agree to do battle with the zippers, and of course then my fingers barely worked because they were so cold, resulting in a more difficult time with the zippers.

    I was also running one of the original buck-and-rolls...that thing is like a sink in the rain. The buck-and-roll was where I store all my electronics, and needless to say, that didn't work too well. Great for the desert though.

    So when I returned from my last trip, I searched "Giant Loop vs. Mosko". I was either going to purchase the new roll-top closure coyote or a Mosko system. After researching for days, I decided to try out the Mosko Reckless 80. Mosko advertises: 80L total capacity, with 25L in each side bag, 22L in the rear duffle, and 4L in each of the two rear pockets.

    I travel pretty light and really don't need much more than 40L, but I thought it would be nice to have the extra capacity for those times I just need some temporary extra space for one thing or the other while I am on the road (food and water mostly).

    So here is my honest review of the Reckless 80 in comparison to the Giant Loop Great Basin (in case anyone cares):

    1. The Mosko R80 is NOT made for bikes with a small waistline, like my KTM 500 XCW. It flops around like old woman boobs on the back and is impossible to secure tightly with the included hardware. Mosko does not advertise the Reckless 80 for use with dirt bikes, and my personal experience confirms why. The GL Great Basin can be used on my 500 or my big-bottomed R1200 GSA and secures tightly to both. I have also used the GLGB on a XR 650R with good results.
    2. The Mosko is stiff...like Viagra stiff. Out of the box it is very difficult to manipulate and get loaded. Mosko claims this gets better with time and I suspect it does as the fabric breaks in a little. The R80 made from very thick material and multiple layers and that makes it difficult to get the dry bags in and out of the sleeves. I applaud the durability but suspect I will get a little frustrated with a product that needs to be broken in before it will work optimally. I guess I will think of it like a good pair of hiking boots - stiff at first, but then they become a part of you? Also, the R80 requires some assembly. The GLGB is ready to go out of the box and does not require any break-in period.
    3. The R80 is a much more complicated system than the GLGB. Lots of clips, straps, etc. I count 18 straps and connections whereas the GL has 7. On the R80 I get one strap secured only to find out I need to release it to get a different strap secured first. I'll figure out the routine. However, the extra straps on the R80 do offer more ability to strap on that extra water bottle or Subway sandwich. However, I suspect it will make packing a longer process. The GLGB lends itself to those days when you're packing before coffee and your brain isn't working yet.
    4. All the Molle straps make the Mosko more customizable. There are a ton of Molle compatible bags out there that one can easily add or take away from the R80. Not so much with the GLGB.
    5. The beaver tail - the R80 beaver tail is well thought out and offers a lot of extra function and organization. The GLGB has a beaver tail also, but with far fewer bells and whistles.
    6. The rear pockets on the R80 are perfect for things like oil, extra fuel, tools, various lubes (who am I to judge) - anything you don't want to explode in the main dry bags. Giant Loop offers some add ons (the possible pouch) that could serve this function, but it will cost $100 for two. However, if choosing the GLGB, you would still be less money even if you purchased the possible pouches.
    7. Dry bags: The R80 dry bags do not have a purge valve. I think this is the biggest shortcoming of the Mosko system. The lack of a purge valve greatly limits packing capacity because you can't get the extra air out when packing things like sleeping bags and clothes, thus it makes it more difficult to get the dry bags into their designated sleeves. The new GL systems come with purgeable dry bags and that is just f*cking brilliant!
    8. Ease of packing: I was hoping the R80 would be easier to pack than the GLGB and that simply isn't my experience. It may get easier as the fabric breaks in, but for now, it is so hard getting those dry bags in the sleeve I am considering dusting them with baby powder. The loop at the bottom of the R80 dry bags helps, but once in as far as they will go, there is still a couple inches of unused space at the bottom of the sleeve. The R80 dry bags are also made from a material that, although durable, is very grabby, thus making it more difficult to get a sleeping bag inside.

    So after receiving the R80, I decided it will be used for my R1200GSA or my wife's F700 GS. It fits easily on either bike without even needing the heat shield since both bikes have factory racks.

    [​IMG]

    So I was still looking for a bag for my 500 since the zipper on the Coyote was getting harder to close and it wasn't really waterproof. Christmas came early and I received the Mosko Reckless 40 today. I debated getting the new roll-top coyote but decided to try something new. I got all my gear together this afternoon and loaded both the R40 and Coyote.

    So you have an idea of what I need to pack:

    My Kitchen:
    [​IMG]

    My bathroom:
    [​IMG]

    My closet:
    [​IMG]

    And my bedroom:
    [​IMG]
    I use a hammock sleeping system with a top-quilt and underquilt. The packable size of the underquilt and topquilt is about 20L. Also seen is the hammock (green), tarp (grey) and inflatable pillow (red).

    With the R40, I was able to get the kitchen, bathroom, closet (sans shoes), and part of the bedroom into the two dry bags.
    [​IMG]

    The remainder of the bedroom and water filter fit inside the 8L Stinger. The camp shoes and "ass-pad" were strapped under the beaver tail, the Primus bottle and tool pouch went into the two rear pockets. This is the result:
    [​IMG]
    There is absolutely NO extra space. The shoes and ass pad take up most of the space available to the beaver tail. I put some goggles into the designated goggle pouch and they barely fit, in fact I kinda had to scrunch them in and suspect if I left them in there long term they would be permanently disfigured.

    By way of comparison, here is the Coyote loaded with all of the above. Normally I strap the shoes and ass pad to the top of the Coyote, and that leaves me with enough room for a Subway sandwich and a couple liters of water in the bag.
    [​IMG]

    Although the advertised weight of the Coyote is less than the R40, I found they were not that different when loaded with all my gear. The R40 was just over 20 pounds loaded while the Coyote was just under 20 pounds.

    Most of the listed Pros and Cons about the R80 above apply to the R40. The dry bags are very difficult to get into the very stiff material, and it will take some time to figure out when to compress one strap vs. the other strap. Also of note, the rear pockets on the R40 will just barely accommodate the 1L Primus gas bottle.

    I am fortunate in that I have a little extra disposable income for my riding addiction (but I make up for it by my utter lack of fashion sense - it's TJMaxx all the way for me). If I had to make a choice for one bag that would give me the most bang for my buck...I would go for the Roll-top Giant Loop Great Basin and add one or two Possible Pouches for the gas, oil and lube. The GLGB will fit both big and smaller bikes, can handle up to 68 liters of gear (not including the pouches), it costs less, is infinitely less complicated, and is generally easier to pack.

    I hope my experience helps.
    #10
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  11. Aircooled6racer

    Aircooled6racer Been here awhile

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    I am using the Giant Loop Great basin as well with the roll top. The Mosko stuff is nice but is more complicated than it needs to be. The great basin can be removed quickly and carried inside your tent or hotel. One trick I have learned with the great basin is to use smaller dry bags to put your stuff in. Then you can put them in the Giant Loop drybags or just throw them in the great basin. Like what was stated above the purge valves on the drybags is great. You can add Possible Pouches or a Rogue or Tillamook drybag to store your tent or damp stuff in. A little tip is to use a drybag as a cooler when you fill it with ice to keep your stuff cold. When finished dump the water and ice out and fold up the drybag. Lastly if you put the great basin in the right spot it makes a nice backrest for those longer trips.
    #11
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  12. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    @HickOnACrick that's a really great post, and confirms my feelings on the mosko bag I tried in my garage a couple years ago. I switched to a GL Coyote last year and love it. I miss having all the weight below the seat, and until someone makes a rackless 40l bag the coyote is the winner for me. It's like an old hammer. A simple, reliable tool with no sex appeal:lol3
    #12
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  13. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    Big Mosko fan here. Chose the R40, rackless 40 liter system, after doing a good bit of research on GL, ALtrider Hemispheres, Wolfman and Green Chile. You really can't go wrong with any of these. Just do a little research to see what best fits your needs. We are pretty lucky to have so many good dual sport/adv luggage options...

    The R40 has been a very good size for me. (WR250R) It fits very snug. I can pick up the rear of the bike, and yank it back on the trail, without the bags moving at all. Gets very tight when packing for a camping trip, but has a ton of room for dual sport riding. I come from a hiking background, so light/efficient packing is my preferred method. The R40 is a good fit.

    ADVANTAGES: (some of these advantages are shared by all of the rackless options listed above...)
    No rack needed. Early on, I knew this was the solution for me. Small bike, keep the weight down as much as possible.

    Holster style system. After some research, the flexibility of this design became one of the biggest factors for me. Having the option of an open-ended, cinch-able "pocket" is very useful.

    "Beaver tail" top bag solution. Again, big time flexibility. You can strap just about anything up there. Or, leave it empty and just use the goggle pocket for dual sporting.

    No zippers. In my experience, zippers just aren't a good solution for hard-use bags.

    Plenty of straps for cinching. The bags can be cinched down tight. It is one thing to get the luggage securely fastened to the bike. It is also important to stay as narrow and tight as possible for cramped woods trails.

    Easy on and off. Less than a minute to remove the whole thing from the bike. A couple of minutes to put it on and cinch it down tight. Comparable to a saddle. You can remove bags individually and keep the base on the bike, or remove everything as one.

    Separate, truly waterproof bags. Roll-top style bags are tough, simple, proven, and absolutely water tight. The buckles are bomber, and replaceable. I prefer to pack things in separate bags, especially when dealing with wet weather. Some bags only get opened inside a shelter.

    Very tough materials, solid construction. The whole system is solid. Stiff, no flapping, and plenty of solid hand-holds available for picking up the bike. Minor, off road offs leave no trace of damage or wear. I go down a lot. My plastics are really rough. Cracked, broken and scuffed. The Moskos look no different than they did when I put them on.

    Molle webbing.
    A nice little bonus. There are a lot of really cool products available that use this system. The little bags available from Mosko are perfect for 20 oz. beverages, tools, first aid products, etc. (the Mosko molle bags are not waterproof)

    Rear pockets. Pockets added to the backside of the leg holsters make good use of space and are perfect for 1L fuel bottles, camp chairs, tools, etc. (not waterproof)

    Customer Service. It has been a pleasure doing business with Mosko. And, being active in a forum like this is really helpful, and takes guts. Kudos to all of these companies that put in that effort. Very cool to be able to give direct feedback, and have a conversation about it...

    DISSADVANTAGES: (I can only come up with a few...)
    Expensive. I guess you can soften the blow by thinking of "value" and "getting what you pay for"..... But, no doubt about it, these are premium-priced bags.

    Heavy. Not needing a rack is nice for trying to save weight, but these bags are still heavy. I guess you have to find a weight/toughness ratio that works for you...

    Lack of security. You just can't "lock" soft bags. Not really. No matter what you do, easy access is available to anyone with a sharp knife. You can try to slow down the thief, or be a tough enough target that they move on a look for a quicker, easier option. Various cables and things are available for this. The easy-on-and-off factor becomes very important if you go with a soft bag option. That might be the most important security feature for any soft bag system.
    #13
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  14. jackbyo

    jackbyo @sunnysideup_mc

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    Worth considering the Altrider Hemisphere Saddlebag (not the hemisphere panniers). Designed by the dude who made the original GL, it's similar to both the GL Coyote and the Mosko 40L. Has a couple more features than the GL, while not being as fussy, complicated and heavy as the Mosko.
    My friend has the GL Coyote, and after inspecting it for a while I went to the Altrider. Much easier to use/remove, more waterproof, no zips, holster system is great blah blah.
    I used it on a road trip on a bonneville recently. No problems at all, wouldn't change anything.
    So easy to slide the main bag out of the holster, throw it on your shoulder and walk into a motel. Reattaches into the holster in one minute

    https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/altrider-hemisphere-saddlebags

    installed-altrider-hemisphere-saddlebag-2.jpg
    #14
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  15. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator Super Supporter

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    Plebeian,

    Did your R40 dry bags become easier to load over time?

    Another thing I forgot to mention; the way I have my bike set up, the R40 is quicker to remove and put on than the Coyote. YMMV.
    #15
  16. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    I've had the bags for two years, and I wouldn't say that they have softened up much. Maybe not at all. That said, I never really noticed a problem shoving the dry bags into the legs. You definitely have to have the loop-strap-thingy pointing down and heading for the opening at the bottom of the leg. When packed full, I'm not sure I could get them in all the way without having that loop to pull on from the bottom. If you are having trouble right off the bat, you can loop a length of strap through the loop and out the hole, so you can pull the bag in from the very top. I haven't had to do that, but it seems like it might work pretty slick.

    I haven't tried to load full dry bags into the legs with the bags off of the bike... maybe that would make things tougher...

    If the weather is good, I generally load and unload the dry bags without removing them from the legs. That makes things a lot easier.

    For those unfamiliar with the Moskos, the photo below shows the straps sticking out of the hole at the bottom of the leg holsters. Those strap/loops are attached to the bottoms of the dry bags.

    Mosko strap.jpg
    #16
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  17. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    I am using wolfman expedition dry saddle bags/small duffle right now, but if I ever change it up, I’m going to try out a mosko r40. The 40 seems pretty tight though for camping off the bike. I definitely will need to get a less bulky shelter. A reckless 60 might be the perfect size.
    #17
  18. Plebeian

    Plebeian Scruffy-Looking Nerf Herder Supporter

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    It is tight for multiple days. Some ultralight-style equipment would be required. Basically the legs carry all of my dual sporting stuff. A top bag is used if I am camping. The size of the top bag is determined by how long the trip will be. You can get longer straps to use with the "beaver tail" and fit any sized bag(s) you would want. I don't like to go very big back there. My dual sport stuff in the legs (LARGE tool kit, spares, etc.) weighs more than my camping stuff, so the weight stays low. I have gotten by just using the supplied 8L top bag so far, but that means going very minimal on clothes.

    My moto shelter is a bivy sack plus a tarp. So, pretty minimal. Also, an Alite chair gets stuck into the beaver tail. My knees and back kind of require a chair.

    I could see the rationale for a 60. IMHO, the 80 is too wide for a dirty bike, and I think that the legs hang down a little low... I like bringing as little as possible, so the 40 has worked.
    #18
  19. Janus9

    Janus9 Been here awhile

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    I have seen the 80 on a 250 DS and the center section is too wide, which causes the side bags to hang funny. It is really meant more for larger ADV bikes.
    #19
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  20. cal08

    cal08 Long timer

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    I have GL and the Mosko 80. Both are useful and I regularly use both. I use the GL when I carry less. GL fully packed can be a bit of a pain if you don't pack it with forethought. Mosko is a bit more compartmentalized, which many like, me included.
    #20