Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    32,221
    Location:
    Nippon
    If the motor with a slipper clutch will make the rear wheel slide, the rear brake isn't going to do shit. Motorcycles, and brake technology have moved on since 1986.

    ...and if the bike doesn't have ABS odds are that you are more likely to high side yourself than stop in a controled manner, seen that over and over.

    If the bike does have ABS it doesn't really matter as you can't really get yourself in to much trouble, but its just bandwidth you are waisting things that could be savign you like evasion.

    Most of the touring/sport-touring bikes have linked brakes anyway.
  2. JDK111

    JDK111 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Oddometer:
    300
    Location:
    W. Canada
    This is the worst single piece of advice in this thread.
    1) see the chart above that illustrates differences in stopping distances .
    2) are you really claiming to know the intricacies of every bike's brake system.?
    4bikes likes this.
  3. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    32,221
    Location:
    Nippon
    One of the highest decel was a sportbike floating the wheel.

    Every motorcyle that I have owned in the last 30 years will slide the wheel on the engine alone...and the most common cause of guys going down on the street where people standing on the rear brake and high siding themselves.

    Like I said doubious. Alot of bike have MTC with linked ABS brakes and won't let you screw up with either brake, AND will apply the rear for you. So stamping the rear lever is a waste of bandwidth you could be using on other tasks...like clamping the front and steering.

    Analogue bikes most riders are 50/50 about making the situation worse with it. How many actually practice full speed threshold braking with both brakes? I know I don't.

    Not saying don't use your rear brake, I use mine all the time.
    Chaostrophy likes this.
  4. BigBaltic

    BigBaltic Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2018
    Oddometer:
    76
    Location:
    Chicago
    Wouldn't this person's suggestion also make it so your break light is on ALL THE TIME?
    Chaostrophy likes this.
  5. mjc506

    mjc506 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2013
    Oddometer:
    231
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    You can cover a brake without pressing it, surely?
    Even Madder Matt likes this.
  6. Signal 13

    Signal 13 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2018
    Oddometer:
    475
    Location:
    Bedford, Indiana
    Just because you have the right of way, it doesn’t mean you have the right of way.
    dowdell and Motorius like this.
  7. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    32,221
    Location:
    Nippon
    Not the way I set my rear levers, it takes a concerted effort to cover my rear level, intentionally. I have to lift my leg to get to it.
  8. mjc506

    mjc506 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2013
    Oddometer:
    231
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    That sounds sensible...
    Even Madder Matt likes this.
  9. Tripped1

    Tripped1 Smoove, Smoove like velvet.

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    32,221
    Location:
    Nippon
    Again the bike will slide the rear wheel with engine braking alone....both of my bikes will actually, they have the same brake calipers.

    In fact I can stop the KTM FASTER with the rear ABS turned off (I am not alone read some early 1290 SD-R reviews) because the MTC is extremely conservative so if you are on binders to the point that the rear wheel changes speed in comparison to the front it lets off of the front brake for you, annoying on the street dangerous on the track. So I usually ride with the rear ABS disabled, and as such I don't want any chance that I can stab on it by accident....that goes back to the 50/50 shot of making matters worse with the rear, self inclusive.

    The other reason that I make the rear an effort to get to is that I tend to use it as a crutch for poor lines and/or poor throttling, making it a pain to get to forces me into the clearner corner entry, and more careful throttle work. When my primary bike has a throttle response described by a buddy of mine as "a punch in the face" these are things I find it worth while to practice. On my 2000 Speed Triple I got into the habit of dragging the rear slightly to reduce the driveline lash that bike always had, its not a requirement on my current rides.

    Again, I am not saying don't use your rear brake, I use it, a lot, I said covering it is of dubious value. Covering the front is absolutely essential, I very rarely take two fingers off of the front brakes if the bike is in motion, same with the clutch.
  10. Pinarretta

    Pinarretta Wubba Lubba Dub Dub Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    551
    Location:
    Morrison, CO
    The laws of physics > the laws of man
  11. ArtCuisin

    ArtCuisin Adventurer

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    98
    Given that most people over age 55 shouldn't even be driving, it must seem perversely gratifying to encourage
    somebody to take up something that will most assuredly lead to their injury or death. I live closely amongst
    many over age 55 and I discourage such newbies from motorcycling. If they haven't had the urge well beforehand,
    then they probably can live without motorcycling in their lives, or die/become disabled with motorcycling in their lives.
    (But you caught me in a rare mood. I normally don't even care what I think about these kinds of things.)
    Rippin209 likes this.
  12. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Oddometer:
    6,704
    Location:
    Seattle & Phoenix
    Wow.

    I started in my mid/late 50’s just under twenty months ago, have about 12k miles in, and am on my 2nd multi-State ride from Seattle to Phoenix as I type this.

    Not only can’t i image 55 being too old to start, I’m hoping I manage to ride until I’m 75 yrs old.

    In the last few months I’ve towed roughy 6-7500lbs behind my crew cab pickup on three occasions between Seattle and Phoenix, doing 2 of the three 1500+ miles trips in two days. Third one I detoured thru LA to drop off something for a friend.

    In your world I guess I need a pasture. :dirtdog
  13. Gil Favor

    Gil Favor Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2016
    Oddometer:
    156
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Why bless your heart, I used to think that way about anyone over 30. I'm glad I didn't read your post 2 years ago when I turned 65 and learned to ride a MC. I would have missed the speed courses at Durhamtown Offroad, over 8,000 miles of 2-tracks, forest roads and winding country roads in central and eastern TN, SW VA, western NC, south MS, NW GA, NE AL and SE LA. If I had read your post, I wouldn't have wasted my money on a dual sport and street cruiser that I could have better spent on pre-purchasing a grave site.

    Actually, I consider my XT250 dual sport bike to be an old man's third choice way to enjoy the backcountry, since my shoulder injuries prevent using a backpack, and my knees and back suffer on long horse packing trips.
  14. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Only dimly aware of a certain unease in the air.

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2014
    Oddometer:
    3,796
    Location:
    Lancaster County, PA
    Ah, you have so many surprises coming to you as you grow older. Keep your eyes and mind open as you go and you will be likely to enjoy those surprises. Seriously.
    sharps5090 and mossycreek like this.
  15. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,228
    Location:
    New Melbourne, Newfoundland
    Never trust anyone over 30
  16. BigBaltic

    BigBaltic Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2018
    Oddometer:
    76
    Location:
    Chicago
    FTFY
    Jarlaxle likes this.
  17. Chibiabos

    Chibiabos Child of the Magenta Line

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    5,817
    Location:
    Especially if they're waving you on.

    California drivers can't breathe unless they're moving. And stopping makes their dicks hurt too. Point is that California drivers will do all sorts of dangerous shit in order to avoid stopping for any reason.
    Sal Pairadice, skibum69 and Motorius like this.
  18. mossycreek

    mossycreek Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    394
    Location:
    NW Arkansas
    Wow, I guess I need to turn in my drivers license before long. Come to think of It, guess i'll quit race B class hare Scrambles the same day since i will be so fragile at 55. Lol if your 65 and want to learn to ride get on it. Well spoken from a young person. I guess my teen age daughter below has no place riding her modified ktm200. She might break a nail for prom. FB_IMG_1540846283312.jpg FB_IMG_1540846239334.jpg FB_IMG_1540846293208.jpg
    Sal Pairadice, Huzband and skibum69 like this.
  19. mossycreek

    mossycreek Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Oddometer:
    394
    Location:
    NW Arkansas
    Try to hook up and ride with experienced riders that respect your "NOOB ness". They will always be willing to wait at turns, not over push you as a new person and more than willing to help, if you have to traverse an area over your skill set.
    greasyfatman likes this.
  20. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Oddometer:
    13,228
    Location:
    New Melbourne, Newfoundland
    Riding with better riders will also help you to be a better rider.