Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Only gusting to 40? Try gusting to 80, that keeps you on your toes!
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  2. JohnCW

    JohnCW Long timer

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    I find early Sunday mornings in a major city (Sydney) to be a time where great care needs to be exercised. I'm regularly riding at this time getting to early start day rides.

    With very little traffic on the major arterial roads, cars pull out of side streets with less attention compared to when the traffic is much heavier. They just barely, if at all, pull up at the stop sign, take a brief glance up the road and seeing the usually busy road without a vehicle (the motorcycle on its own coming toward them doesn't even register), swing out wide onto the road crossing a couple lanes.

    Yes the roads are much quieter early Sunday mornings, but I find this also makes many of the car drivers on the roads at that time very inattentive. On a 'time on the road' basis, I've probably had to take more major evasive actions on early Sunday mornings that any other time. And that includes riding daily in peak hour traffic (which is mostly constant minor shit, like people wanting to change lanes).
  3. taofan50

    taofan50 n00b

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    Learn to have control of the throttle at all times, do not chop it, make the movement smooth and controlled on acceleration, deceleration or maintainance. Your ride will be more enjoyable and pleasant.
  4. millican

    millican Been here awhile

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    That's a good one for driving as well.
  5. FlyingLo

    FlyingLo FlyingLo

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    I enjoyed my first full road riding season this past summer and logged over 10k on backroads riding a dual sport (650 Vstrom) but will consider myself a noob for as long as I can ride. I believe it is the single best mindset you can have to improve your safety. I agree with others in this thread who have stressed the need to really know how your type of machine handles in ALL conditions. This is best done in a more forgiving environment like dirt at slow speeds than wet pavement at high speeds. I have returned to motorbikes after a lifetime of enjoying aviation sports (hang gliders, skydiving, and acrobatic flying). I hope that the skills I developed and safety habits accrued in those activities will transfer to this realm of what I consider simply flying low! My following observations will echo much of what has been said in this thread but I would like to attempt to summarize with some guiding principles:

    Risk can not be eliminated, only mitigated. I have tried to learn to understand and objectively assess what I can do to control factors which impact my safety. In this category I agree with thinking of yourself as “invisible” and try to improve my odds of being seen with hi-vis riding gear and investing in readily available lighting technology (headlight modulator, taillight flasher, and turn signals configured as daytime running lights).

    Establish and practice personal minimums. This is a set of “go no-go” standards covering everything from riding gear, personal fitness including being under the influence of any substances, weather, traffic congestion, time of day (rush hour, night), riding fatigue, road conditions, speeds, traffic separation, etc. ATGATT falls into this category as does “bottle to throttle” for which I adhere to 12 hours.

    Develop and maintain situational awareness at all times while riding. This comes down to anticipating the unexpected and knowing your escape route. In flying it combines systematic scanning of your flight gauges and all quadrants of the sky. On motorcycle it is almost the same minus the flight gauges for the most part. Also the key to scanning is to avoid target fixation and to calmly take in everything within your field of vision. Greater the lead time you have in any adverse situation the greater are your options to avoid problems. This translates directly to lane positioning, approaching blind corners, changing road surfaces, obstacles, etc.

    I have enjoyed reading this thread and hope to learning more of how others in the forum have sought to improve their safety while still enjoying the sport.
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  6. joso

    joso Motorcycle addict

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    All this advice, considering this and that, do and don‘t, think of, always and nevers, safety here and there....


    does anyone remember that all this shit about motorsickles has got sth to do with having fun and enjoying to ride?
  7. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

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    Far better to learn from the mistakes of others than to make them yourself.

    I’ve watched hundreds of hours of ‘moto crash & fail’ YouTube videos to learn what not to do. I still make mistakes but for 2+ years riding in they’re very very rate now.

    Noobs are noobs. We’ve all been there. No one starts with a full head of learning...
  8. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    I quit watching crash videos. I was starting to learn all of their bad habits.
  9. jml141

    jml141 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I'm sure this has been covered, but I came across this article today. When I bought a brand new Tiger 800, I struggled with this. I felt like I had spent alot of money on a thing. I wound up going on some amazing adventures later and it was worth while, but I wish I had had a better grasp on this concept when I bought my bike. @dwj - Donnie told me when I met him about riders who buy expensive bikes but then can't afford to take them anywhere, and I always try to convey this to new riders when they are contemplating buying a motorcycle.
    Link to article - Forbes.com
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  10. BarryB

    BarryB Been here awhile Supporter

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    The most important thing for noobs to know is that, nobody sees you! When you look at them and you think they are looking right at you, they are really looking right thru you and wondering what they are going to eat for dinner!
  11. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

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    There’s a lot of truth in there.

    That said, if buying the Harley or GS is ‘the dream’, there is a certain unfulfilling nature to ‘settling’.

    And certainly buying quality is important. We see lots of people who ‘buy cheap’, then have so many issues that by the time the item is fully working they’re so tired of the hassle they can’t wait to sell it and move on.

    I’ve had a lot of toys in life, and most I got out of for close to what I got into them for. And some of the experiences I had along the way were priceless.
  12. Tool.Nerd

    Tool.Nerd An idiot that owns a bike

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    With my $2800 SV650/s, I rode everywhere, in conditions I should've had my ass whooped for. Drop it slipping on slick pavement at a redlight? Yep. Multiple times. Picked it up and kept riding. Learned lots.

    Bought the Street Triple and it was "too nice" for me to ride everywhere. Had this stupid preconception that it was delicate. I turned into a fair weather rider for a while. It took a while for me to get past that and stop caring. When I did, though, I started having fun again.
  13. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    I don't baby anything except my beer glass collection and all of my shit shows it including my bikes.
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  14. DasBatman

    DasBatman Adventurer

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    When counter-steering, don't put any force on the bar opposite of the lean direction you intend until pushing opposite to get out of the lean. The more you focus the pressure uninhibited, the bike can do what it is designed to do and your handling of the motorcycle will improve ten fold.

    This one improved my confidence on my motorcycle ten fold.

    EDIT:
    Also... Motorcycling is a lot like programming. If you don't practice your skills, you will lose them... and there is always something to learn or practice. Don't be a know it all.
  15. kames

    kames Been here awhile

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    Where this gets muddy is a lot of the sorts of things I'm passionate about buying become the tools for experiences. Also, I don't overly value the money itself, I often think I don't really care about money unless I run out of it.
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  16. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    Yeah like now, I'm totally out of $$, I need to get back to work.:lol3
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  17. kames

    kames Been here awhile

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    Understood :nod
  18. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    It's gonna be 4 months without working, my credit cards hate me but so far I'm still covering the mortgage.:lol3

    But on the good side we've gotten a shitload done on the renovations for the moto B&B we're building, we should be open for this season.:D
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  19. Edoz

    Edoz n00b sauce

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    Since this seems to be the place to enlighten noobs, I'll ask this here.
    I have a 2" flat strip in the center of my rear tire from 5k mi of riding. No big deal, I expect that.
    Today, I ride 100mi out and 100mi back with a stiff cross wind all day. Now I have a flat strip on each side of the center strip, and my tire looks like half a hexagon.
    I guess riding leaned over wears your tire super fast? I never would have expected a noticable flat strip from 100mi or less. Is this level of wear normal? (Pirelli Scorpion Trail 2s)
  20. Ibraz

    Ibraz Been here awhile

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    when was the last time you checked your tire pressure?
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