Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. Edoz

    Edoz n00b sauce

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    Derp! It has been a couple of weeks and sure enough, it's low. Now I feel dumb, AND I have flat spots on my tire. :doh
    ChuckS and Motorius like this.
  2. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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    I'd have to see it but I'd be surprised if that tiny mileage did squat. If you were saying 5000 miles then I might think you have something.

    I forget to check my tire pressure regularly on my 640 and my 525 is running old mousses that are so soft it looks like I have 10 lbs of air in them. Even that soft and the fact I can make the rear tire spin in the rim it still handles fine on the highway.
    mitchxout likes this.
  3. shoeb

    shoeb Long timer

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    My one bit of advice for street riding; being on a bike is awesome, you can do all kinds of things a car driver can't. But every time you do something a car can't do, like shooting away from a stoplight, diving into a gap with a gob of torque, or even filtering, NEVER assume any car drivers will be expecting it. Never expect car drivers to be looking between lanes in a queue, never expect them to realise you're now in the spot that was free 1/4 second ago, and so on. Car drivers generally know jack shit about motorcycles, what they can do, or how the highway code is different for them, so they'll mostly just assume you will do whatever they can do.

    Example: I used to get people cutting me off on roundabouts a lot until I realised this was mainly because they didn't realise I could go from waiting at my exit to 25m down the road in half the time their cars could. They were assuming I'd only be able to accelerate as fast as their 1.2 hatchbacks, so they thought they'd have loads of time to get on the roundabout ahead of me. Now I make sure I throttle on nice and steady unless the next exit is empty.

    TL;DR: whenever planning a maneuver on the street, ask yourself how drivers around you, who know nothing about bikes, would be able to see it coming.
  4. VX Rider

    VX Rider Long timer

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    Even the Tesla car technology can't handle predicting what or where a motorcycle is coming from....so for sure most humans wont be able to either.
  5. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    Good post, and of particular importance in this scenario: You are in one of two same-direction lanes. You are behind a slower vehicle, and there is another vehicle in the other lane, next to the slower vehicle. The slower vehicle turns, by use of a turn lane or other exit bay. DO NOT immediately speed up and occupy the space it was in. The other car driver in the other lane will never be expecting you to be able to close that gap so fast, and will probably be wanting to get in that lane now, more than likely right over you.

    Drivers seem to be outrageously impatient on the roads. If a gap opens, somebody in a cage was waiting for that moment and will be darting into it shortly, assuming it will still be empty if they move really fast. If you are always the first person to occupy new gaps, you are going to get hit.
  6. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Very cool. NS and Newfoundland are on my list of rides to do ( From NY) along with Bar Harbor. Do you have a link or details to the moto B&B? Also, info local riding.
  7. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    This is great advice. I might rephrase a bit and say - if you occupy those new gaps, be ready with an escape route and a wary eye. Two sides of fhe same coin really. Its sort of the psychology of defensive riding.
    LuciferMutt likes this.
  8. P 0 P E Y E

    P 0 P E Y E Bald rider Supporter

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    I simply can’t handle the temptation of riding like a total tool bag on the street if on a sport bike.

    Gaining confidence and speed. Getting to the edge. Starting to drift. Thinking I am getting it. Suddenly it gets me and high side the freaking thing.

    The dirt slows it down and there’s no cell phone soccer milfs that kill
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  9. skibum69

    skibum69 slave to gravity Super Supporter

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  10. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious

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    Popeye man, that is the story of my life right there.
  11. mitchxout

    mitchxout Long timer

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    I wonder how many new riders start on bikes with touch screens? It's still shocking to me they're allowed at all.
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  12. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Only dimly aware of a certain unease in the air.

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    Not just on bikes either. My wife's car has a touch screen and to do anything with it you need to be looking at it. My cheap little car has knobs and dials. I can correct the temp, redirect the interior air, etc and never take my eyes off the road. Or the guy on the motorcycle.
    Rippin209 and mitchxout like this.
  13. BJMoose

    BJMoose that trick never works

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    When I worked in television post, my co-sufferer Ron, hated touch screens and multi function buttons. His motto; "One knob, one job".
  14. ATadam

    ATadam Adventurer

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    I've been learning in and around constant city traffic, it's basically semi-controlled chaos so yeah the best thing you can do is to be predictable and act like a car. People will totally invade your lane and won't respect your size but you just have to keep a watchful eye and move on, also lane positioning is super important for being seen. If somebody in front of you hits the brake then tap the rear just enough to activate the light even if you're just slowing down by gearing down, if in front always back off the intersection a bit so cars turning and cutting the corner close don't hit you. Really important to see way ahead and whether people might be jaywalking, pulling out, opening car doors, etc. and slowing a little bit under the speed limit = more time to read and react for both parties. Always veer towards the side of the road and not into oncoming traffic if you can't help it (also keep a constant check of what cars are around you for this obvious reason lol). At every light make sure you can see the driver in front of you in the side mirror and turn the handle bars so if somebody per change did slam into you you'd at least not get pancaked. Watch out for fresh coolant/oil at long intersection waits, expect that the tire lanes might be worn down and wobbly, watch out for pot holes, if you do have to go over some absolutely awful patch jobs then do what they teach you in MSF and get your butt just off the seat. Avoid situations where you have to wait to turn left but there's not a turn lane. Use your acceleration as a tool to get away from people, not just something you use constantly. If you're on a smaller motorcycle then avoid left hands at lights because they probably won't activate. Pedestrians are even worse at awareness than cars. Any big truck in the city hates being there so expect erratic behavior from them. Don't bolt out at intersections if you can't help it because people always blast through yellows till the last second. Even if you get to the stop sign first wait to confirm other drivers are actually stopping, sometimes nudging out a few feet gets their attention. Yadda yadda it becomes a game basically.
    Motorius likes this.
  15. mrstormy

    mrstormy Adventurer

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    Well, he is MIA for more than a year, and, with all his prior bravado, he's either dead or incarcerated. I checked out his youtube channel and looked for him online. poof, vanished. Not surprised.
  16. Chibiabos

    Chibiabos Child of the Magenta Line

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    Goes way beyond bravado. He has a few videos where he's flat out picking fights with people. At one point he almost got into a fistfight with an old man. They weren't even moving, if I recall correctly...
  17. safeTnerd

    safeTnerd Adventurer

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    Remember (for the old guys) sitting in high school driver's ed and watching the gory crash scenes from the state highway patrol? The slogan was "Speed Kills"....they would give out bumper stickers declaring such ... It' still true today ..... many motorcycle deaths/accidents can be avoided if we would just SLOW DOWN ..... I just watched a video on the news where a car driver blatantly blew a stop sign and T-boned the motorcyclist. It was on a residential street, the car driver clearly at fault .... but the motorcycle rider did not slow down one bit for a look at the intersection before entering.
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  18. Hima

    Hima n00b

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    This is my first post. I read through this whole thread. I’d say it was about 85% garbage arguing/repeating things/really bad advice/etc. and 15% incredibly good information, which made it frustrating because I realized I would need to wade through the mud of the whole thread in order to read all of the good info. I have loved and wanted to ride motorcycles my whole life. I am what you would consider a new rider, I rode an XR75 for a couple years as a teen until it got stolen, then recently on a whim I bought a Grom. Rode very often on it for a year, put in 2600ish miles, and then I decided to graduate to a Himalayan a couple months ago. I’m retrospect, riding the grom for a year was an excellent training device; I got the feel of riding a motorcycle (albeit a very smalll one, but one that was easy to handle/control) around the streets in urban traffic in my city. I have a lot of experience riding road bicycles as well, and honestly a lot of those skills definitely transfer into the moto world. One thing I gathered in my year and a half or so of motorcycle riding is seriously how many assholes are riding motorcycles out there on the road. It’s really bad, actually, and these dicks are giving every motorcyclist a bad name with their behavior. People going way too fast splitting lanes, super lame loud pipes, kooks on sport bikes wearing T-shirt’s and vans, idk man the list goes on and on. One of the worst things is when some loud pipe asshole is splitting lanes in gridlock traffic and repeatedly loudly revs their bike if the gap is too small, “I am the motorcycle god, you must part the seas for me!!!!!!” Jeez man, maybe just be patient and wait 20 seconds for a gap to open up? I’ve seen dudes on sport bikes literally kick the sides of cars with their boots in this scenario, crazy. It’s weird; I love motorcycles and riding, but hate a really large percentage of motorcyclists. Really too bad it has to be this way, so much macho douchebag bullshit in this scene. Why so entitled? Why so dickish to everyone on the road? Fuck all of you guys that act like this. And this thread, yeah wow even as a somewhat rookie I cannot believe how much bad advice is in this thread, unreal. Bad motorcyclist just inbreeding more bad habits. Yes I am a new rider, and I feel like in life, you are never a master of anything, just always a disciple. The learning never stops. So i don’t want to come off like I have it all figured out, because I don’t, I just don’t like a lot of the stuff I’m seeing out there, it’s not good! (hope this makes the guy who called me out below happy). But anyway. Yes, some of the tips in here have proven incredibly valuable to me and I thank the providers of those tips very much. Here is my tip to add, and this totally applies to driving your car as well. If you see a dinged up / dented up car, like many different dings/dents, really make a note to watch out for that person, because they run into things with their car and don’t give a fuck, and they will run right into you too. Ok bye
  19. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

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    I feel comforted that a guy with 1.5 yrs of experience on a Grom knows more than the accumulated wisdom of many over 145 pages of thread.
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  20. Hima

    Hima n00b

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    I said there was some very, very great valuable info in this thread. Starting out on a small, slow, easy to manage motorcycle is good advice for a new rider, is it not? Vs starting out on a 500lb bike that goes 100mph? Would you rather I did the 2nd thing? Can you not agree that there is tons of poor and misleading info in this thread? And that there are lots of awful moto habits out there in the streets happening every day. I want to be a really good, responsible rider that is a good representative for all of us out there. You just think I’m some kook. That’s ok man. Do what you gotta do. I won’t argue on here anymore, I just think that the things I said are worth reading and thinking about and new riders (say me 1.5 years ago) could maybe learn a couple things from the things I said (start on small bike, don’t be a cocky asshole out on the road and make us all look bad), hence the reason for this whole thread