Most Important Things to Know For a Motorcycling n00b.

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MotoMusicMark, Mar 26, 2010.

  1. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

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    My take...

    Ever meet that guy who just knows it all? Has an opinion about everything and everyone else but not enough life under their belt to understand the hows and whys of the way things work?

    I got my first bike (in a verrry long time) in late 2016. I wouldn’t dream of coming on this forum to comment on how other people ride the way he did. And most certainly not in my first couple posts with endless run on sentences and no formatting.

    Shit, even now I may comment on stupid drivers, but the only ‘real comment’ I’ll make about other riders is I believe not wearing a helmet is selfish — as someone else may have to deal with you as a vegetable for decades to come.

    People are going to do what they’re going to do. Sometimes for valid reasons, sometimes for no reason, sometimes because they’re just plain stupid. (And I’ve done my own share of stupid in life as well). Shouting from the mountaintops has long been out of style.

    I got a friend who works in management for a large contracting company. One of his freshly-minted journeymen went to HR and complained my friend was being ‘condescending’ to him. Basically this guy thought because he was now a 4 year trained journeyman he knew more than a guy who worked his way up the ranks and was nearing retirement, so he didn’t want to hear anything about anything from my friend. Then he proceeded to fuck up a job to the tune of ~$12k. So now the company is gonna eat that $12k, and this ‘journeyman’ not only has to re-do the job but also sets the project back a couple weeks. With the HR complaint, it’s near impossible for my friend to shit-can the guy now even though it’s a costly mistake by a know-it-all. But...when the economy turns down, I bet you can guess who my friend lays off first.

    One of my own kids is entering the trades. I had to teach him the words ‘I know’ don’t exist in his vocabulary because some journeyman is gonna year him say that and bust his balls for a long time as a result.

    That guy read the whole thread, and good for him. I read the whole thing too. It’s a good thread. His attitude didn’t contribute anything to it. He was like that newly minted journeyman.

    Me? I got a few years under my belt, a few things to add, a few options as well. But I’m still a fucking noob in the great scheme of things. And I guarantee I’ve read more books and watched more videos on riding than the vast majority of riders out there.

    It’s good to be a little humble. It can keep you out of trouble.

  2. GravelSlinger

    GravelSlinger Adventurer

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    I have an almost 16 year old son that will probably be on a street bike sooner than later. He has been riding dirt bikes since 3 years old & has a good head on his shoulders. It's not his ability I worry about, but the other folks not paying attention. This exact thread came to my mind when we were having talk about difference in dirt & street w other vehicles ... I have assigned it to him as homework to read through & think about these situations & tips. So thanks to everyone who has contributed to this thread!!!
    Rippin209 and Sugra like this.
  3. Motorius

    Motorius Road trippin' Supporter

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    Best thing you can do to help him is make sure his future ride had plenty of added lighting running during the days both front and rear.

    We can teach them a lot, but what sticks is beyond our control.

    Btw, the MCRider channel on YouTube is a must for him.
  4. bk brkr baker

    bk brkr baker Long timer

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    My usual advise to new riders about street riding is:
    You are invisible to 95% of car drivers.
    The other 5% that notice you either don't care if you live or not , or are actively seeking a way to kill you.
    Now some may think this is overstating the situation , but it works for me. 49 riding years on the street and still at it.
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  5. MauiCowie

    MauiCowie Long timer

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    This is not correct. There's about 1 or 2 percent of drivers that do care about you. They are also motorcycle riders who just happen to be driving a car. But you never know who they are so your best bet is just to assume that everybody is out to kill you.
  6. WIDGIN

    WIDGIN When In Doubt, Gas It Now

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    Good topic and you are still almost invisible to that 1-2%. In 50 years of riding and 40 years or driving I've had the experience of almost hitting a motorcycle or two that I simply didn't see.
  7. PlainClothesHippy

    PlainClothesHippy Riding a dangerously quiet bike.

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    I am re-reading the book Down the Great Unknown by Edward Dolnick about the first expedition down the Grand Canyon and noticed that the last time I read it I had dog-eared the bottom of a page. I was curious as to why but when I read the page I knew why. It contained the following nugget of wisdom about river running that applies well to riding.

    "On a big river, things can go bad in a hurry; to react, rather than to anticipate, is almost always to respond too late."
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  8. geolpilot

    geolpilot Been here awhile

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    That is good advice for nearly anything. I have operated that way flying light planes and operating large 85 ft to 110 ft motor vessels, most of them single screw. When it is very windy, you damn well better have it figured out in advance.
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  9. BywayMan

    BywayMan Been here awhile

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    Three-way intersections are a favorite place for sand or gravel to pool. The road that t-bones the other typically is the culprit. Slow up before r.h. turns into them.
  10. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short guy

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    Naw, get a dual sport and slide around the corners with style. Yahooo!!!
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  11. Appalachian Twin

    Appalachian Twin Adventurer

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    #1. Nobody sees you, especially if they look you in the eye
    #2. Everyone is trying to kill you.
    #3. Everone has a finite number of miles they can ride

    So therefore ATGATT
  12. VX Rider

    VX Rider Long timer

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    how many miles do I have left?
    Just so I can budget my riding
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  13. T.S.Zarathustra

    T.S.Zarathustra Been here awhile

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    Overconfidence always hurts you.
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  14. eight90eight

    eight90eight Been here awhile

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    Each time we throw a leg over the seat we're noobs. We see shit we haven't seen before. Bad driving, bad biking. Adjust to the condition, add to memory bank.

    Riding in the eighties when most cages couldn't get outta their own way is far from the cages zipping around today.

    Drivers are not being trained. DMV safety is a joke. Most training happens in parking lots by bad drivers training new drivers. The stupid testing is beyond a joke. Just sayin......not to mention deer management by wildlife experts.

    So, dress for the occasion. Fall back a bit when anticipation radar goes off. When things clear out a bit you can maybe sniff the air, scan for wildlife and take a deep breath.

    No one seems to give damn, or give anyone a break. Part of the chaos that's been a long time a-brewing. Take care cuz it's not getting better before it gets worse. IMHO.
    CaseyJones, Motorius and scout68 like this.
  15. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short guy

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    The way things are going I want to take out my riding suit foam padding and get it kevlar coated or maybe ceramic armour.
  16. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

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    Learning how to use your eyes is vital in m/c riding. Scanning constantly, always looking far enough ahead, and not fixating on any one thing. Seeing, not just looking.
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  17. mminob

    mminob Been here awhile

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    Yes, I always liked the MSF mantra , SIPDE ... Scan, Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute... The MSF has changed it a little nowadays ... Your vision is key to staying out of trouble... Just ask a racer like ,

    Mark Marquez... He had eye surgery for double vision, from a bad crash in 2012... And it seems to have helped him pretty well I would say :thumb

    3b2745ee2ccc750851319bd9450d94f8.jpg
  18. CArcher77

    CArcher77 Adventurer Supporter

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    In the words of Han Solo; “Great kid, don’t get cocky.” I mutter this one to myself a lot.
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  19. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

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    Smoothness with all inputs, whether steering, throttle or brakes is a must.

    By looking ahead and thinking ahead, one can achieve this smoothness, and great joy will follow.

    Riding as smooth as possible should be on the agenda for every ride of a newbie.
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  20. Laboratory Rat

    Laboratory Rat böser meister geist Supporter

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    I'm constantly playing a "what if" game. Always considering all the potential "what if's" around me, and ensure I have contingency plans. Once I've accumulated too many what if's to monitor, or cannot decide on a survivable contingency plan, it's time to bug out.
    PFFOG and CArcher77 like this.