Moto Guzzi 1994-1998 1100 Sport Thread

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by MedicAndy, May 15, 2018.

  1. Rimspoke

    Rimspoke n00b

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    Of course, I remember seeing the rectangular headlights and thinking at first they were Daytona's, I had not seen a rectangular light on a sport before.
    I ordered my sport in July or August of 94 and each week I would call and ask if there was any news on a delivery date and each time it would be "maybe next week"
    it was finally delivered in December and I was told later that one of the big hold ups was tooling for left hand dipping headlight and that the factory were so strapped for cash,
    that they had not paid.
    I think I had been riding it around for a few months when there was a recall and it was for the headlight, it turned out they shipped the first batch out with
    right hand dipping lights.
    No other pictures from inside, I don't think they wanted visitors taking pictures.
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  2. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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    It took ten weeks to get the red painted starter cover back from the Paint & Body shop, but I finally got it. I didn't know if replacing the black carbon starter cover with a red painted fiberglass cover would look possibly a little too flashy or over the top, but I think the red cover turned out looking better than the black cover did. The original rear seat fairing on this bike had many scratches and touch-up paint, so I bought a new red seat section, which had one paint flaw, which was also fixed. That new seat fairing is now also installed. I think that I'm going to install a Trapezoid headlight and fairing on this bike too, which will then complete this project.

    To the left is the carbon starter cover I had installed on my 1997 1100 Sport. Starter covers were never installed from the factory on any 1100 Sport, so I bought one, which came from a V11 Sport, and I really liked the more finished look of the engine compartment with the cover installed. I did then took the visual aspect a little further by installing the factory red color matched starter cover, which I really like on that bike.
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    This is the factory 1997 1100 Sport factory look, which shows the starter exposed.
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    My 97 with the carbon cover installed.
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    And now with the color matched fiberglass starter cover installed.
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    The paint shop did a great color match.
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    Hanging around to dry after they received their second clear coat layer.
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    My original seat fairing had about ten scuff market all over, which always bothered me.
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    The previous owner also did a pretty bad job trying to hide some of the scratches........
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  3. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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    It is too bad that Moto Guzzi never had enough money in the bank to really keep going with improving on their bikes....

    Is it ok with you if I share the factory pictures with the 1100 Sport FB forum?

    Andy
  4. Rimspoke

    Rimspoke n00b

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    No problem, I hadn't thought about a FB group, I might have a look
  5. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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    This group has about 700 members, and all are either current or former 1100 Sport owners. It's a really great source of knowledge, if something ever goes wrong, if you need a part, or just to show off your ride.
  6. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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    Moto Guzzi hand-build 1,314 fuel injected 1100 Sport motorcycles in 1997. Two-hundred of those bikes were sold within the US, and probably less than half of those bikes are still around today. The 1994 - 1997 1100 Sport motorcycles are not for everybody.... I obviously love them, while others may not like them at all. I consider the 1100 Sport a "Gentleman's" motorcycle. Not that I consider myself to be a gentleman, but the 1100 Sport should probably not be ridden or owned by someone who likes to do wheelies or burnouts! Several 1100 Sport owners that I know take their 1100 Sports to track day and ride their bikes hard all day, which is what they were designed for. The 1100 Sport actually should be ridden "like you just had stollen it" but there is a difference between doing so and abusing it...... Did I mention that I like my 1100 Sports? :)

    Here are a couple of my yellow 1997 1100 Sports with a little about their history & modifications:

    I bought the first 1997 1100 Sport (Bumblebee with the black wheels) about three years ago from a local Raleigh collector. He had bought this bike in non-running condition several years earlier, and he also could not get it to run right either. The bikes right cylinder's spark plug was not firing, so this bike ended up sitting amongst many other cars and motorcycles in his homes 4k sql basement. I started switching parts out at random, after I purchased this bike, since I also didn't know what the issues were. Luckily, troubleshooting and swapping parts out on a 1100 Sport is easy when having a stable full of them. I first checked the relays, fuses, installed new plugs, checked the wiring and connections..... nothing, the right cylinder did not fire. I then exchanged the most costly part of the electrical system, the ECU, and Bingo... the yellow 97's right cylinder fired right up after I replaced the ECU, and the "bad" original ECU was also bad after I installed it into the donor bike, so the problem was identified & solved. This 1997 1100 Sport has a full Stainless Steel Staintune exhaust, K&N air filter, cylinder crash bars, and the factory ECU chip was replaced with a Will Creedon performance chip. I rebuild the wheels with new wheel bearings and had them powder coated in black. I also installed new front & rear Brembo brake rotors, pads, and new Dunlop tires. This and my red 1997 are my favorite 1100 Sports to take out riding.

    The second bike in this video is a highly modified 1997 1100 Sport. This bikes original collector / owner had this then new bike completely disassembled after he bought it in 1998. He then had all yellow body parts repainted by an LA custom shop , since he believed the MG could had done a better job with painting this bike. He then had the engine blueprinted and the cam balanced. The fuel mapping was changed from the ECU to a Power Commander. This bike was then reassembled with wrapping all electrical lines in a special insulation to protected them from engines heat. A German company fabricated a custom instrument cluster and a one-off carbon air box were also installed during the reassembly. A set of cylinder crash bars & a custom fuel pump heat dissipator with mounting bracket were also specially fabricated and installed. The exhaust was custom build by Staintune as a one-off full stainless headers with crossover into Carbon / Stainless exhaust pipes. The factory front and rear Brembo brake rotors were replaced with custom carbon racing rotors. The factory foot pegs & brake / clutch levers were replaced with custom pegs / levers. Additional changes & installations made to this bike were the custom seating covering, a custom carbon alternator cover, a color matching starter cover, the turn signals were changed from square to oval, and the handlebar grips and brake fluid reservoir were also upgraded. This bike, after reassembly, was then dyno tuned at Pro Italia in California. The original purchase cost of this 1997 1100 Sport was right at US $13k when new. The original owner spend that amount again when he had this bike customized. This bike was then sold with 3,600 original miles in 2013 to another collector living outside of Toronto, Canada. Sadly enough, the Toronto collector passed away sometime around 2016, and I was able to buy this bike from the Estate in July 2019. Moving this bike back into the US from Canada was not as easy as I thought, so it was October 2019 until I had everything cleared with the US Customs & Border Crossing agency for importing this bike back into the US. I gave this bike a full service, which entailed changing all fluids, filters, new spark plugs, and greasing of the final drive-shaft. I also installed a breather into the final drive, and I had a new set of Pirelli GT II tires installed.

    I consider this bike to be my "Holy Grail" of 1100 Sport's, and I know that I should ride it, but I don't! I bought this bike for shows, and I would like for it to end up one day on display within a Motorcycle museum or a Sports Bar.



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  7. KeithU

    KeithU Been here awhile

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    Lovely bikes. In 1997 I got to burn a tank of gas through a yellow press fleet 1100i in the hills south of San Francisco. It was a magical experience, and I still hope to own one someday.
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  8. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    Over a decade with mine has taken me (and it) down a slightly different path. Many would argue "more trouble than it's worth" but I persist. After all, it took this long to get it running right. I recently discovered another source of agro the mandates dropping engine and trans. But, the "real" problem is figuring out how to do it without tearing the motorcycle completely apart. "Engine out the front" doesn't seem to be a option, since the front subframe is welded (not bolted) on. Anyone know an easier way?

    Attached Files:

  9. ajpjive

    ajpjive Been here awhile

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    Just had mine out of my '95 Carbie. Basically ended up pulling absolutely everything off to get it out. On the plus side, I guess it gave me a chance to do some other service. If you do find a better strategy, please report back!
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  10. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer Supporter

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    Hey Andy, bet you don't have one in this color. :D
    [​IMG]

    https://iconicmotorbikeauctions.com/auction/1997-moto-guzzi-1100-sport/
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  11. vagueout

    vagueout Long timer

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  12. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    VITAL oil feed.jpg IMG_1496.JPG VITAL oil feed.jpg IMG_1496.JPG 20201007_113805.jpg Abjive (and any other interested observers)... as per post #148...the task has been performed! It turned out to be easier than anticipated. Even tho Sport 1100 carb bikes do NOT have removable front engine mounts on the frame, it is simply a matter of taking things slowly and "finessing" engine and trans as a unit, slightly forward and down after all ancillaries are disconnected and all mount bolts are loosened or removed. Assembly really is the reverse too. No wheel or shaft removal required BTW. (A lift is the key! See pics)

    The reason for the dismantle, was the discovery of the rear main bearing "oil feed dowel" in the bottom of the oil pan during an oil change/external filter addition project. What is CRAZY mysterious, is how the dowel got there? I have no records of service on this bike previous to my acquistion 10-years ago at 20,000+ miles. The only possibilities I see, being - it was "misplaced" during a previous service adventure, or...it was shipped from the factory in this condition! Either way, when found, it made the hair stand up on the back on my neck, because the bike has been ridden and ridden hard for all these years and miles (@23k now)...yet ran flawlessly.

    Anyway, with problem rectified, new clutch installed, external oil filter added, and engine painted...it's BACK...and better then ever.
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  13. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    Sorry about the duplicate images...posting such...NOT user friendly or easily edited.
  14. ajpjive

    ajpjive Been here awhile

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    That black engine looks absolutely superb @KipW. What did you paint it with?
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  15. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    Thanks ajpjive! I used Rustoleum 2000-degree - both black and clear top coat. Considering that I might well be the worst, most impatient rattle can freak ever - it turned out pretty well. I credit the paint completely! One alternative paint choice is Harley-Davidson "texture" black engine paint. That stuff is superb (and durable), but stupid expensive @ $25 a can. So, I opted for a gloss at about one third the price. We'll see how well it holds up over time...
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  16. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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  17. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    MedicAndy - your point is well taken. Not everything is destined to be a 100-point restoration, but all are intended to be ridden. This was/is largely the story with mine.

    My machine came to me with issues, most minor (one NOT), and it has taken time and effort to sort it. That said, it runs far better than it did stock and is more comfortable, much lighter and easier to live with. This - leading to more frequent usage, since I don't have to "work around" most of the compromises in the stock version. It has gone from a back breaking, poorly jetted, "Sunday special" to an elegant, long-legged, "Gentleman's express" type of bike, usable any time under almost any circumstances.

    Slightly off topic...since you own so many and have experience with all...both carbed and EFI....which do you prefer and why?
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  18. Geoff

    Geoff Long timer

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    I tried to find a clean, all original 1100 Sport in yellow paint a few years ago. What I found was junk or overpriced garage queens. Might search again when the virus settles down.
  19. KipW

    KipW n00b

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    Geoff...be more specific please. When you say "clean, all original 1100 Sport in yellow" all it tells me is you like yellow. Define "junk" and "garage queen"? Considering how few of these bikes exist, it might be difficult even after Covid to locate one that's "perfect".

    I personally consider "perfect" an obstacle, not an objective. Because nothing is ever perfect...or "all original" in my experience (unless it's still in crate somewhere.) Had a friend who found a Desmo Ducati in a crate. Cost him a fortune... then he had to get it to a "clean" usable condition after decades in a box and by then it was REALLY nothing LIKE original.

    More often then not, it's like the story about George Washington's "original" hatchet (of cherry tree fame)...turns out the handle's been replaced twice and the head three times!

    Does this make sense to anyone?
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  20. MedicAndy

    MedicAndy It's not always easy being me!

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    I get emails every month from people asking me if any of mine, or if I knew of a 1100 Sport for sale by someone else. I think that you are going to have a hard time finding a clean, original, serviced, and sorted, with 25k miles or less 1100 Sport on a budged price.

    I believe that the old saying "you got / get what you paid / pay for" is a very true statement. I don't know what your budget is, but I bought enough 1100 Sport's to know that a "cheap" bought 1100 Sport will cost you to get it sorted, updated, and serviced.

    Most of the people that I know are very different then I am, especially when it comes down to picking out a bike that I'm interested in. I love buying lower milage "trailer" or garage queens, and I'm happy to pay up for them. I usually deal with three type of buyers, if or when I'm ready to sell one of my bikes.


    Buyer type 1: Looks for a running bike in need of some cosmetic or mechanical work, which he or she will address. I bought most of my bikes (usually closer to the $5k price), fitting into this category.

    My usual purchase cost of a bike fitting into this category is between $2,500.00 to $5,000.00, depending on how much work these bikes need. I usually end up with spending another $2k - $4k to get those bikes up to my standards, which is not necessarily a trailer queen, but those bikes are going to be well sorted, nicely optioned, very minor cosmetic imperfections (if any), fully serviced, and include new tires, battery, and brakes. A bike that you ride, but you can also enter in a local bike show. If I do, then I would sell those bikes between $5.5k to $7.5k (I sold four bikes this year fitting into this category).

    This is a type 1 purchase, a 1997 I bought about two years ago for $2.5k This is one of my project bikes, which is going to cost me another $4k to get it restored. It doesn't look like it in the picture, but this bike has many, many cosmetic issues....... The engine and everything in yellow will need to get re-painted, and the wheels need new powder coating, and that is only the beginning......
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    This is another type 1 purchase. I paid $4.5k for this bike, which I assumed was a good deal. This bike had been sitting for several years, so I had to do a lot of sorting to get it right. For instance, it needed new front and rear tires, brake rotors / pads, the brake calipers needed rebuilding, I had to remove the Power Commander and but a Will Creedon ECU chip to sort the fuel mapping issues out. I also needed to buy a new battery, full service with replacing all fluids, filters, and most gaskets. I then had to replace the timing chain and tensioner, besides doing a couple of other things..... I lost $1k when I sold this bike........ My lesson learned was to not buy something just because it was "cheap" and looked good...........
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    Buyer type 2: Looks for a barn find, which should be cheap, is low milage, and it should be a well sorted & serviced bike. The usual buyers expectations include upgrades like a performance exhaust, upgraded carburetors or ECU performance chip, new tires, new battery, new brake rotors.....

    A couple of years ago, I was lucky enough that I have found one bike fitting into this category. It's a now 9k miles red 1997, which was on display at a Wisconsin motorcycle museum for most of it's life. I paid $6k for that bike, which had some minor issues that needed to be addressed. The title listed this bike as a 1995 and not a 1997, it needed new tires, and it had some fuel mapping issues, which needed to be sorted out. I also ended up replacing the rear fiberglass seat section (due to some scratches and touch-up paint) with a new factory part, which I found at a Guzzi dealer in the Netherlands. This bike is one of three 1100 Sport's that I own, which is a trailer queen, and this bike should be on display at a museum or Sports Bar. I would never sell this bike, but I place my personal value for this bike between $9k to $10k.

    Bikes like this don't come around very often, so I would not wait to find one like this, since it may never happen again....... I have around $8k into this bike by now, so it may not be budget friendly either, depending upon your spending limit.......
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    Buyer type 3: Looks for a well sorted, lower milage, nice performance upgraded, and no cosmetic issue bike. The purchase cost is secondary to the overall quality of the bike being of primary concern.

    I only bought one bike fitting into this category. It is a highly mechanically and cosmetically customized yellow 1997, which I imported from Canada in October 2019. This bike has too many upgrades to list, but the cost for everything that was done to this bike by Pro Italia in California equalled the original bikes purchase price. The original owner spend upwards of $25k for purchasing and then upgrading this bike. I didn't spend $25k for this bike, but I did pay up for it, especially since I had to import this bike back into the US, which cost me around $1,500.00

    Of all the 1100 Sport's I own, this bike is my "Holy Grail" of 1100 Sport's....... It may not be the best sorted or setup 1100 Sport in the world, but it is right up there with the best!
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    I sold one of my 1997's (which fits into this 3rd category) last month for $9k plus shipping, and the buyer paid for the bike in cash without questioning the selling price or the value of that bike.


    I'm now down to three "trailer queen's", a yellow and a red 1997, and a 1995 silver 1100 Sport (I do ride them, but I don't "ride it like you stole it"). I also have a 1996 blue Sport, which is just a "regular" rider, and I have a red 96 and a yellow 97 project bikes. I also have a complete 1996 & a 1997 part bikes (or maybe future project bikes), so I'm pretty much done selling any of my bikes. I would recommend to anyone looking to buy one of those 1100 Sport's, to do so when the opportunity is there. These bikes are collector bikes, and they are going up in value. I would also recommend to spend maybe $2k more for a nicely $6k to $7k sorted bike, then to go for the $3k to $4k bargain find and then end up spending $2k to $3k and a year or two on weekend labor sorting this bike out after the purchase. But, those are just my thoughts........
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