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Moto Guzzi 850tt to Alaska?

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Qaz, Feb 7, 2021.

  1. Qaz

    Qaz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    447
    Many years ago a friends son rode a Quota 1100 to Alaska. Said it did well and he had no break downs or any trouble. Has anyone ridden a 850tt to alaska and on up the dalton to the ocean? It has been out long enough that it should have made the trip at least several times. I would be interested in the comfort, any problems, how far off road did you go, and when you were starting home did you wish for a different bike?
    #1
  2. Qaz

    Qaz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2012
    Oddometer:
    447
    Has no one ridden a V85tt to Alaska? That seems like the bike to take that trip on!
    #2
  3. bisbonian

    bisbonian Long timer

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,577
    Location:
    Tucson, AZ
    It's been in the US for about a year, a year in which the Canadian border has been shut down due to COVID. I'm sure there weren't too many trips north last year.
    #3
  4. X1Glider

    X1Glider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Oddometer:
    937
    Location:
    Tomball, TX
    I 'd made the trip to Deadhorse from Houston, Texas 3 times on different bikes...a 1100GS in 1997, and H-D FXDX in 2000 and a Buell X1 in 2002, always in July. Anchorage was my home base because I had friends living there. The road going up had improved each time I made the trip. Even my dad went up on a H-D Ultra Glide back in 2011 when he was 63 and did just fine. The bikes were never a problem. Lots of people make the journey and on bikes you'd think would fall apart on a regular paved road.

    1. Gas: It's no longer necessary carry lots of it, you just need to plan to be places before they close up for dinner. Because in the summer, it never truly gets dark, you easily lose track of what time it is, so waking up at the crack of dawn when light starts to poke through the curtains and stopping when the sun goes down isn't a recommended way to start and finish the day. Either way, you should make sure to have decent capacity in case a aplce is closed. Carry cash for it too. Card readers are few, or were, and operability was spotty. Gas ain't cheap either. I paid between 5 and 7/gallon on my trips. Also plan for when pumps are broken. So fill up even when you don't hink you need to. I'm not just talking about Alaska either. All through Canada...they love to close up by 6 or earlier.

    2. Road surfaces: My journeys were mixed. Anything from asphalt, tons of graded gravel and hardpack and I've even forded water on my first trip to where the roads were covered. Nothing was ever hard. Deadhorse and a few small towns are mud pits. Try not to slip and dump it.

    3. Traffic: seems to have gotten worse every year. RVs everywhere. Lots of bike though as well, which is cool. A bucket list for everyone for sure. On the Dalton, it can be dangerous in that the trucks running it day and night go fast and take up as much of the road as they can and really don't give a shit as to who else is on it. Get the hell over when they're comiing at you and let the pass if they're coming up behind you too. They're not scared to put the pedal to the metal and pass your ass.

    4. Unplanned excursions: Back to keeping plenty of gas in the tank. I've made plenty of side trips anytime I saw a dirt road going to the middle of who knows where. Know where the next gas station is that way you know how far you can go pildukin' before you have to turn around and find that station.

    5. It's a long trip: I don't know where home base is for you Qaz. But for me, each time I went, I did more miles per day. It stay light so long that you can go a full day and not realize it. I did a 27 hour stint on my last trip from Calgary to Carmacks just because I was in the zone.

    6. Make reservations: Not every place is big enough to have rooms available for everyone passing through. I camped half the time. Some places in BC were too damn nice to not want to stay there and even stayed extra days depending on if they advertised excursions or even had a 2 day minimum. Make sure you have a good credit limit.

    7. ATTGAT is important. Temperature and weather swings can get extreme.

    I's an easy trip for even a beginner ride IMO and don't worry about the bike. Just look out for wild life. There's Caribou, deer, fox, musk oxen and bears everywhere and none think twice of darting out into the road.

    Just do it. The V85TT should handle it with ease. It's be a shame a Buell to show it up.
    #4
    woodenhorse, scottdc and Dracula like this.
  5. CycleSick

    CycleSick Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2012
    Oddometer:
    152
    A Buell X1?!! As they say, pictures or it didn't happen! I wouldn't try and make Alaska on a tuber if someone paid me. :lol3 A Uly, well that's different.
    #5
  6. X1Glider

    X1Glider Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Oddometer:
    937
    Location:
    Tomball, TX
    I was still using a Le Clic disc camera up to '99. (Hey, it worked for 15 years and I had a crap load of film from when the "real" camera store went out of business. $100 got me over 50 discs) When the film ran out, my next camera purchase wasn't until 2005, my first shitty digital Kodak. There's a lot of trips I did that I can't look back on. Of course there are trips I took pictures on where the picures from the Le Clic weren't worth a shit either. That's being cheap for ya.

    Surprisingly, the little X1 was very easy to ride long distances, even with Crossroads rearsets and low bars. Only had an Oxford Humpback tank and tailbag and a Ventura rack for the tent and bag.
    #6
  7. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,479
    Location:
    Berthoud, CO
    Yes, the V85TT would be an excellent bike to ride the Dalton and Dempster, and an absolute pleasure crossing Canada and Alaska. Regarding riding to Dead Horse, it has probably been done by every make and model, from Harley baggers to a Honda Ruckus.
    I rode them in 2009 on a BMW F800GS; the only limitation is the rider's skill. The Dalton had the worst "pavement" and the deepest gravel I have ever ridden, and the gravel gets slick when wet.
    Before the trip I bought a wrist watch with an alarm that I set for 10pm to remind me that I needed to go to sleep, and with a light so I could see the time in the morning to let me know that I should sleep longer.

    Dan
    #7
    X1Glider likes this.
  8. JBBenson

    JBBenson Adventurer

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2018
    Oddometer:
    25
    Location:
    Atlanta
    #8