Moto Guzzi Stelvio?

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Truckin_Thumper, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. StelvioGT

    StelvioGT Ride!

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    Pic's?
    #21
  2. olie

    olie Long timer

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    ...Stelvio owners, can you share any reliability issues with the 4V engines?
    There are too many rumors, typically from non-riders of these Guzzis. Can you shed some light? THANKS.
    #22
  3. sfarson

    sfarson On a Ride

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    Billd left this post after returning from Alaska...

    Zero reliability issues with the Stelvio here, after 13 months of ownership.
    #23
  4. cagiva549

    cagiva549 whats a cagiva

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    I haven't ridden the Guzzy , I have a 1200 gs , I wasnt impressed with the gs on pavement and it was almost scary off road . I did a bit of drooling at the Guzzy though . The owner of the one I looked at closely goes thru a lot of bikes and he bought a GS to replace the guzzy a year ago but the Guzzy is still in his garage , when I asked him which one he liked best He said " there are a lot more accessorys out there for the GS " . I wouldn't want either as a dirt bike but as a road bike that wont wimper at dirt shortcuts both are as good and faster than my GC . The Guzzy wins hands down in looks . It could be my mental attitude , I have worked on german machinery and hated it so maybe I am biased , I have been very pleased with my Dago bikes . I have had some issues with my Austrian ride but not in the handleing or preformance department . SEYA
    #24
  5. jamboa

    jamboa jamboa

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    You spelling is terrible!
    #25
  6. boxermoose

    boxermoose Regressive airhead Supporter

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    Fixt:eek1

    Anyway his cooking makes up for his spelling - by far
    #26
  7. Forseti

    Forseti Long timer

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    15000Km on mine. runs great and no problems outside of the speed sensor failing when it got wet. Was replaced without issue.
    #27
  8. sotosfz6

    sotosfz6 Adventurer

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    Apr 26, 2008
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    Patras, Greece
    40000km on mine. No issue except from the recall on 20000 km(the specific bike didn't had the problem) and a light signal button change

    just come back in Greece from Iceland. A lot of gravel two riders and all the camping package. The bike rules. I saw another italian there with stelvio , 30000+km with no issues too. I 'll have some photos up soon.
    #28
  9. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    Just returned from a 10K cross country ride and she's at appx 17K in 9 mos of ownership. I had a r12 previous to the Stelvio and I loved it, the MG just has more "X" factor. Mine was well sorted and the latest tune even improved on that. A good dealership is the key to owning a Moto Guzzi as most complaints were due to pathetic set up and lack of knowledge in too many of the too many new dealerships. Take a test ride, the engine/trans and F.D. is bullet proof and offers a unique experience in motorcycling.

    Cheers
    #29
  10. Roadscum

    Roadscum Long timer

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    It sound to me like you're living the good life!!! YES sir a good dealer and proper set up is a key factor for a good running Guzzi. Mike and Davey at MPH in Houston got my 1200 Sport to run great and the guys at GuzziTech provided the products to add a little zip to performance. Which of the dealer got you gizzi properly sorted????
    #30
  11. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    Yes, life is good right now, just afraid I may wake up and have to return to the real world someday :rofl

    I bought mine at Moto Nexus in Hendersonville, NC. Steve has been a long time MG guy and is meticulous in the shop. Only other shop that worked on her was Moto Int in Seattle during my trip. They both do wonderful things with motorcycles and run "real" shops vs boutiques w/ little knowledge. All bikes have quirks/failures and a good dealer helps keep them in perspective while still making a positive owner vs some of terribly frustrating stories we all read about (on all brands).

    Cheers
    #31
  12. wncstrada

    wncstrada Been here awhile

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    +1 for Moto Nexus! As bobw said, a real shop with great folks.
    #32
  13. Roadscum

    Roadscum Long timer

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    Thanks for the tip on Moto Nexus. I live in SW Florida and get up to Ga/NC several times a year to ride those great roads. It's good to know there's a top notch Guzzi technician in the area.

    I to am enjoying that good life while I'm still able. Next week I'm headed up to Indy for the MotoGP, then to the Catskills & Adirondacks of NY, then back down to NC/Ga.. I plan to be in Maggie Valley when the Cannonball Run 2010 stops at Wheels Through Time, then down to the Dahlonega area for a few days. Maybe we can get together for a ride if your willing to share some of your favorite roads!!

    Regards, Paul
    #33
  14. bobw

    bobw Harden the phuck up

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    I haven't been there, but Riders Hill in GA has had some great reviews on the various MG sites. It's nice to have some good options if anything needs attention. Other than some servicing on the bike, I'll be around until the 17th of September. I don't think SWMBO has any travel plans and I'm always glad to meet for a cup of coffee and enjoy some riding, post or pm when you have an appx time line and we can make plan.

    Cheers
    #34
  15. worwig

    worwig Long timer

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    I picked up my Stelvio at RidersHill in Georgia. Great people to deal with. Plus it is in the middle of some great riding.

    Let me know if anyone is planning a get together or meet.
    #35
  16. Roadscum

    Roadscum Long timer

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    I plan to be in Maggie Valley a few days around 9/12 for this:
    http://www.wheelsthroughtime.com/dales-blog/the-2010-cannonball-run.html

    Then to Dahlonega for a few days.

    I'll be in touch with both you guys.... Maybe we can meet at Ridershill 9/15??
    #36
  17. THE BONE SHAKER

    THE BONE SHAKER Adventure Tourer

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    thanks for the helpfull posts. I currently own an F800GS but will redeem it when my stelvio turns up next week. I cant wait. Anyone here ride extensively 2 up on their stelvio. Feedback would be greatly appreciated.
    #37
  18. Drif10

    Drif10 Accredited Jackass

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    I wrench on Forseti's Stelvio, and have an 07 GSA myself. We ride together a fair bit, are similarly big guys, so rider mass ain't making a diff on performance.

    For two european air cooled 1200 twins, they couldn't be more different. Handling wise, I think the Stelvio is better handling in higher speed sweepers, the GS better in the tighter stuff.

    Power delivery: This is where it surprises me at the diff. Roughly the same power to weight ratio, but the real world sensations... light years apart. Both have good torque, but the Stelvio is much more visceral, more mechanically rough feeling. The Stelvio pulls harder off the bottom, the GS in the upper midrange is where it pulls ahead. Fuel economy is a little better with the GS.

    The ergos are again a bit different, the Stelvio leaning more towards traditional road bike peg/seat/bars layout, whereas the GS is more towards the dirt bike. But we're talking not a lot of difference here, mostly noticed when riding them back-to-back. The seat I find a bit more problematic for pan tilt on the Stelvio, we're looking to improve that with some welding mods in the near future. Seat height is definitely closer to the ground on the Stelvio, though I do have my GSA cranked as high as it will go, not sure about Tim's bike.

    Other minor things:

    Stock lights are crap on my GSA, but $65 later with some HID's, and that's no longer a prob. The Guzzi lights are better stock, but by their shape give a lot more glare off the top of the lens (you'll know why when you look at the lens up close), we haven't tried to upgrade those yet, thinking we might need to make some sort of glare shield when we do.

    Once we got the heated grips sorted out, they work great, except for one minor (but real PITA IMHO) problem: You can only change the setting while stopped. Dunno what they were thinking there.

    The rear seat pops off simply, but the rider seat has two knobs, awkwardly reached, especially when you go to re-install the seat.

    The stock exhaust note is way more manly on the Stelvio. Proper twin boom, but not too loud, as opposed to my John Deere/Singer sewing machine GS sound.

    Front tire size is good, lots of choices, but the rear leaves you with basically sport bike tire choices only, which sucks if you get off the pavement (get stuck lately Tim? :augie ) He's got a new rim coming in, that'll let him run GS sizes front and rear, be interesting to see how that affects road handling, though it's sure to be a great improvement offroad with appropriate tires.

    The Stelvio looks and feels much smaller than my GSA. Tank and cylinders make that obvious. The fuel range is borderline adequate I think, you even lost a bit more because they put this gimmicky 'glove box' on one side, losing you another liter when you didn't have it to spare, I think.

    Servicing:

    Valves are stoopit easy, like my GS.

    Spark plug cap rubber sheathing is crap, even without tearing, once you stretched them a bit when removing, they started shorting out. Electrical tape to the rescue. Known issue.

    Fluids are easy changes, final drive easier than my GSA.

    Rear wheel more fiddly to re-mount on the hub, goes on okay, but not as easy-peasy as my BMW.

    Biggest problem is the throttle body synch. Your left cylinder is your base, and it's simple enough to hook up your vacuum lines and adjust the right to the left. Here's where it all goes south: The TPS is on the right cylinder, NOT the baseline left one, so if you balance the TBs, you gotta zero the TPS so it reads properly. The GS is on the left, and you adjust the right to the left, so no zeroing required, but if you do, then a simple full throttle/throttle off a couple of times while the key is on does it. Not on the Stelvio, you must be plugged into the shop computer. Now there is a reliable aftermarket one available, but you'll need a laptop and pay $300 for the cables and software. This is my biggest nit with the whole bike, frankly.


    Because it's so uncommon, it has appeal to folks who are likely to buy one. But with that 'uniqueness', there's a catch: The aftermarket goodies are limited, and so is the web intel when it comes to repairs/how-to's/mods. There's some very good folks on Guzzitech and WildGuzzi that'll help you out, but for my GS, I just do a quick search in GSpot, and there's a ton of info, and I can carry on after a couple of minutes. Not done usually with the Stelvio.

    It really surprised me at how similar they are on paper, and how different they are in real life. The Stelvio invokes a lot more passion than the GS, which makes sense, when you remember who built which machine. :D
    #38
  19. Forseti

    Forseti Long timer

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    Hmm...

    Interesting reading your take on the Stelvio vs GSA.

    We have never really sat down and talked about it. :rofl That being said.. I find myself agreeing with the majority of your points, especially the fuel range. The tank could have been at least a couple litres larger without changing the cover (and the look) at all. There is a comparable void opposite the glove-box and I would have much preferred the extra fuel.

    As for the torque.. yes I think the Stelvio is a little better off the bottom and in the middle gives to the GS... but once into the top end of the rpm range I think it again tops the GS. ( I am looking into getting the new map which is reputed to smooth out the torque curve to get rid of the flat spot)

    They are very different bikes and someone who really likes the one may not appreciate the differences of the other. (tele-lever esp.)

    I have the new rim sitting here.. (NTX version) and rubber ready to go on... just running out the last of the existing tires as I am unlikely to go back to the wider rear rim.

    Btw Jim... it has been at least a week since I got stuck! :rayof
    note to self... shoulda taken pictures! :freaky
    #39
  20. GT-Rx

    GT-Rx Guzzi freak

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2008
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    60
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    SoCal
    #40