Moto Guzzi V85 TT

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by cabanza, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. twowheeledgator

    twowheeledgator Dork

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    With the exception of some Chinese brands, my experience is that today’s motorcycles are as reliable as they have ever been. Looking across the brands I don’t think you will see anything that resembles Lucas electronics or an AMF Harley. There will always be brands and years or models that are better or worse but overall we are pretty blessed. But if we could ask my grandpa about motorcycles he rode he would chuckle at the idea that anything we have today is unreliable or maintenance heavy.
    I think it is relative and our perspective may be slightly skewed based off our modern experience.
  2. ScottTheFalcon

    ScottTheFalcon Been here awhile

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    I know this is not the US, but rather AUS - the news I got yesterday was that the 2021 bikes have arrived at the dock, to be at Guzzi's warehouse by mid next week, and in dealerships the following week - let's say the 26th May.
  3. RedHawk47

    RedHawk47 Adventurer Supporter

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    I got a phone call today from my dealer that my V85TT Centenario had arrived and they will have it set up in a couple of days along with the others of their allocation, all of which are sold.:rilla

    Dan
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  4. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    Spot on! When I was in grad school at MIT back in the late 70s ("Gosh, were there PEOPLE then?") my summer vacation was

    Step 1) Drive from Boston to our home up in Maine
    Step 2) Pull the cylinder head.
    Step 3) Take it apart and pull the burned valve.
    Step 4) Grind in a new one and put the head back together.
    Step 5) Bolt it back on, torque everything down, and reset the valve clearances.
    Step 6) Drive back to campus.
    Step 7) Add the old valve to my Burned Valve Collection -- sort of like Burning Man, only different -- on the shelf above my desk.

    It wasn't much of a vacation, but I got fairly good at Steps 2-5. By the time I graduated, I'd gotten that part down to less than four hours. Strangely, this all seemed entirely normal :D
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  5. KeithGB

    KeithGB Adventurer

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    Oh for the days when vehicles were simpler and could be fixed at the side of the road and not need plugging in to reset codes and service lights etc.
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  6. borderer

    borderer guzzi 2 shoes

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    My old BSA superrocket has one simple carb. Magneto ignition which is stone reliable and either works or it dosn't. Separate dynamo/charging system which are only involved in the lights, I bought it early seventies and must have done 100,000 + miles. Only one serious blow up when an oil pipe split on the motorway which resulted in a full engine rebuild end feed roller crank conversion all balanced up etc etc. That was about 15 years ago barely anything done since then apart from regular oil changes. don'tt do as many miles on it as I used to when it was my only transport year round.
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  7. kaertner

    kaertner Long timer

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    The thing is that modern bikes don't break down by the side of the road compared to older more 'simple' bikes. I've never, ever had a failure that's left me by the side of the road on a bike since 1998 when I started riding 'modern' bikes. Even the bikes that I had in the late 70s and early 80s never left me by the side of the road. I don't understand why so many have so many issues. There again, all of my bikes remain factory standard, so that might be the key. Even if you are unfortunate to get a breakdown, insurance often includes comprehensive recovery. Mine will take the bike back to my home country if necessary, provide me with a rental car, hotels, flights, trains etc. No need to worry at all about what is in effect, a 1st world 'problem'.
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  8. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    I have mixed feelings about the era when vehicles were so simple they could be fixed on the side of the road. On the one hand, it was nice to be able to fix vehicles by the side of the road. On the other hand, I did seem to spend an awful lot of time fixing vehicles by the side of the road. In the summer, in warm sunny weather, by a quiet road in the countryside when you weren't in a hurry, this could be a strangely satisfying experience -- a triumph of intellect and skill. In Buffalo, in the winter, next to the freeway, with a bitter icy wind blowing off the lake, it was not always quite as much fun. And then there was rain...

    [​IMG]
  9. Night_Wolf

    Night_Wolf Leg Humper

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    Had a starter relay fail on a 3 month old bike with about 10,000 miles on the odo. I had just crossed the border into the USA & had to get the bike towed back into Canada. As it happened, the closest dealer was where I purchased the bike & while they didn't have a relay in stock, they did pull one from a bike on the floor. I resumed my trip the next day
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  10. guzzijason

    guzzijason Been here awhile

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    Yeah, IMHO one of the biggest problems with newer bikes are issues with electronic sensors, many of which didn't exist on older bikes (like, for emissions).
    I will say, however, that the scheduled maintenance indicator is really a simple fix, and you don't need to plug anything in. Just put a piece of black tape over the indicator light, and get on with life. Assuming you are actually doing regular maintenance, there's nothing that light can do to hurt you or the bike, other than annoy you with its mere existence.

    __Jason
  11. SD113

    SD113 Been here awhile

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    This is helpful. My own Suzuki VStrom 650, which I bought in part due to it's reputation for reliability, required a transmission replacement this year. I've never heard of that with another Vstrom. My practical side says Tenere 700, my heart says V85.
  12. kbtulsa

    kbtulsa Been here awhile

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    My V85tt has spent the last two weeks in the shop. Waiting on seals for the final drive. In a few more days it will have spent more time in the shop than in my garage.
  13. SD113

    SD113 Been here awhile

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    That stinks. Curious, if you had to do it over, would you still buy it?
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  14. guzzijason

    guzzijason Been here awhile

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    Don't discount the fact that supply chains in general have been fucked up since COVID started. The Suez Canal debacle didn't help much either (not sure if Guzzi was impacted directly by that or not, but I know other manufacturers definitely were). That's not to say that getting parts out of Italy is normally "fun" (expecially in August, when the entire country shuts down for the month), but... we are in extraordinary times right now.

    __Jason
  15. kbtulsa

    kbtulsa Been here awhile

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    I would still buy the bike. But I would fix it myself. Not mess with dealer
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  16. SD113

    SD113 Been here awhile

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    That's what I keep coming back to. I don't know what I would need the dealer for outside of catastrophic failure or electronics. It's really one of the appeals of the bike.
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  17. kbtulsa

    kbtulsa Been here awhile

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    Unfortunately the rear drive is quite complex. So really needs serviced by dealer . Just wish the dealer was a little better about returning calls or letting me know what is going on.
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  18. bisbonian

    bisbonian Long timer

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    I was absolutely planning on the Tenere 700. I'd test ridding the V85 but it was outside of my budget. I ended up seeing a bargain price at AF1 and then Yamaha didn't open up pre-ordering when I thought they would so I bought the V85.
    A friend bought a T-7 when they showed up, evidently someone decided they didn't want what they had pre-ordered. I took it for a ride and am happy with my decision. Evidently I want a little less dirt bike than what the Tenere delivers.
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  19. Cal

    Cal Long timer

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    I bet those same seal sizes are available at a transmission supply
  20. kbtulsa

    kbtulsa Been here awhile

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    I do to. But it takes special tools to take it apart and have to set the gears up. Has to complete disassemble to do seals. Not a very well though design.