Moto Guzzi's and the WABDR, or how we rode the desert southwest

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Day Trippin'' started by Mooney 78865, Sep 19, 2020.

  1. Mooney 78865

    Mooney 78865 Long timer

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    I am going to start this with a caveat:
    There are four of us on this thread and we will post pics and videos individually. I do not plan, or want, to write the whole ride report without them. They are intragyral to the ride and I think we should do the report in chapter form. SO here is my first two days leading up to meeting in Moab...
    Day 1 and Day 2
    What started as a conversation on this forum between a group of individuals that currently own or formerly owned the Moto Guzzi Stelvio turned into a 4 day adventure ride of Death Valley in January of 2020. In total we had brought together 5 Moto Guzzi's, a Honda Africa Twin, and a V Strom. Most of us did not know each other except on various threads from the forum.
    Four of us started a discussion on doing the WABDR later in the year. Made perfect sense as I was from CA, another from WA, one from ID and the last from OR. Little did we know what would happen this year. Flash forward 9 months. Covid 19 shut the country down, then wild fires ravaged, (continue to ravage) the western Untied States. We kept moving the ride further and further out trying to get past the unforeseen issues. Finally, we had a firm date set for meeting at the Bridge of the Gods in OR on the 14th of September to start the WABDR. The night before I was to depart to Washington we shifted plans to ride the southern portion of Utah. Specifically the White Rim Trail, Canyonlands, Arches and the Valley of the Gods. It was agreed that the fire conditions, and smoke would make the trip miserable if we did the WABDR. SOOOOO, Saturday morning instead of turning right to go north, I went left and headed to Cedar City UT for my first night on the road. The plan was to meet the other three in Moab on Sunday. Some 400 miles later I was in the Cedar City KOA for the night. Sunday morning up and at it for the push to Moab. I was running a few hours earlier than the others and was able to take in some of the sights and do a bit of alternate routing to see places I hadn't ridden before. Most notable of these was the Jug Handle Arch. Pretty much a sort of maintained Jeep trail right up to the point you get to the fallen rock that overhangs the trail. While probably doable with an unloaded ADV bike, the trail was blown up from 4WD vehicles digging badger holes trying to clear the rock section under the "bridged" rock. Wisdom over valor, as I had all of my gear on the bike, nobody but "SPOT" knew where I was, and frankly, I wasn't thrilled about breaking me or the bike at that point in the trip. So I managed to get the bike turned around in about 10 minutes of clutch slipping, bar rocking, more clutch slipping, a bit of cursing and a bit of luck. Did I mention it was steep, rocky and wide enough for a jeep?
    45 minutes later I was laying in a "Zion Bank" parking lot sipping a bottled water waiting for the Doodles to show. About 30 minutes later, there they were. Giving me crap because I told them I was on the left side of the street but in fact, I was on the right side. WHATEVER...

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    #1
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  2. aftCG

    aftCG Long timer

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    While Mooney was taking the southern route there were three of us coming from the northwest (OR, ID and WA). We made a plan to meet after a long days ride in southern Idaho and ride the rest of the way to Moab as a group. I think Don picked a BLM spot at Sublett, ID for some free camping. A look on the satellite map shows the exit at Sublett contains a single establishment with a gas station (one pump operating), a restaurant (closed) and petting zoo (great combination). The camp was 10 miles down a dirt road past that.

    Me, Dons1911 and the Flying Frisian checked in with each other in the early evening. Don and the Frisian were both getting dinner before the heading to the camping spot. They were in Jerome and Twin Falls, about 1.5 hours ahead of me.

    Something told me (correctly) that cell phone signal would disappear on the way down the dirt road to the BLM spot so I called home before proceeding. It was dark at that point but the road was easy going. When I arrived at Sublett Reservoir there was a fork in the road. I was pretty sure I needed to go through the cattle guard and continue on the north side of the reservoir. About that time two people in a Suburban pulled up. The driver was a nice lady and said she would take me clear to the campground. I followed them a ways when we came across a pickup up and driver, above the road dressing out a deer. The man in the Suburban jumped out to help and the woman urged me to follow her. I don't recall ever saying "no" to a woman with a shoulder holster and didn't break the trend that night either.

    The campground was small, maybe 6-8 spots. Most were occupied with trailers that had generators running. I should be happy it was hunting season because the rest of the year it probably serves as a spot to dump a body, run a meth lab or get your "date" pregnant.
    Don and Heinze were already set up and supervised me while I set my tent up in the cow pies (better than the unburied toilet paper near the edges).

    Edit:. My InReach tells me that first day was 709 miles, highest elevation was 5518' MSL and my max speed just under three digits.

    The next morning we packed up and made our way back to the gas station. That place could be doing pretty well if they were open and selling gas and food, but they use a different business model.

    We didn't stay long, and made plans to meet Roy just off the highway in Brigham City, UT. Roy was with us in DV and while he couldn't make this trip with us he guided us through the entire Salt Lake City corridor on the longest car pool lane in the country (and the shittiest pavement repair jobs). He turned us onto highway 6 at Spanish Fork and that was about the last time we saw cell data until Moab, and then Roy left us to it.

    My InReach seems to be of two minds about that day's travel but it's likely to be about 380 miles, maximum elevation of 7329' MSL and another speed check on the rubber.
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    I did not take a single picture until we found Dan on what must have been the left side of the road if you came from the other end of town.

    It didn't take long before we decided to drive to the KOA campground where we secured two spots.
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    #2
  3. Mooney 78865

    Mooney 78865 Long timer

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    You didn't mention the Gal with the shoulder holster! Same one as the one that asked for a "light"?
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  4. aftCG

    aftCG Long timer

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    Ha! No, the woman at the gas station in Sublett could have had a shoulder holster (or Hobbit feet) and I wouldn't have noticed. Let's just say if she has any infants they aren't malnourished. The poor girl needed her cigarette lit. What gentleman would leave her hanging?
    #4
  5. Dracula

    Dracula sagabona kunjani wena Supporter

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    This is awesome! I've got my popcorn.. :lurk:drink

    edit I'm really curious how the Dunlops did!
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  6. Mooney 78865

    Mooney 78865 Long timer

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    I'm not much of a photographer, or video Doodle, but there are going to be some really sick pics and video coming! I really want to share more of the ride, but think decorum dictates I wait until @Flying Frisian and @Dons1911 have a chance to post up their ride leading up to Monday and the White Rim....That's going to be a story! IMG_1806.JPG
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  7. Dracula

    Dracula sagabona kunjani wena Supporter

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    Y'all look great. Apolo 13 mission accomplished!
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  8. Mooney 78865

    Mooney 78865 Long timer

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    Bubba said basically the same thing!
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  9. Flying Frisian

    Flying Frisian Born to Ride Supporter

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    Damn, @Mooney 78865 you're putting us on the spot!
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  10. aftCG

    aftCG Long timer

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    We know that Don made a side trip to visit Kenny (non inmate who was at DV with us), and is riding home today.
    #10
  11. Flying Frisian

    Flying Frisian Born to Ride Supporter

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    Here’s my review of day 1 and 2. As @Mooney 78865 already mentioned, we had planned to do the WABDR, but at the very last moment decided to go to MOAB instead due to wildfires and smoke in the Pacific NorthWest.

    There are 4 riders in our group:

    @Mooney 78865 from Clovis, CA on a 2016 Moto Guzzi Stelvio
    @Dons1911 from Hayden, ID on a 2017 Moto Guzzi Stelvio
    @aftCG from Tacoma, WA on a 2015(?) Moto Guzzi Stelvio

    And yours truly,

    @Flying Frisian from Tualatin, OR on a 2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports

    We had planned this trip after our Death Valley ride in January of this year and I was really looking forward to it. I had installed new AX41 tires and was done packing several weeks before the start of the trip.


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    I decided to leave my expensive and “pretty” aluminum SW Motech panniers at home and take the cheap Nelson Rigg soft bags instead. These bags work well, but are a little small so I added some dry bags from Cabela’s for additional carrying capacity. The setup worked well but it took a little getting used to.

    During the last 2 days before our departure, the wildfires got really close to our town and neighboring towns south east of us were told to evacuate or get ready to evacuate. The smoke was really thick, and I had mixed feelings about leaving my wife alone in this mess.
    This picture below was taken at noon.

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    I normally don’t ride my bike on Interstates or highways and my original plan was to travel through central Oregon and Nevada to southern Utah. All the smoke and wildfires put a hold to that and my only option was to take the I-84 via the Columbia River Gorge to Boise, Idaho and continue on from there to Malta, Idaho to meet up with @Dons1911 and @aftCG.

    I left around 7 am Saturday morning and the smoke was still extremely thick. To protect my lungs, I wore an N-95 mask in my helmet but I’m not sure if this helped at all since I could still feel the smoke burning in my throat. It was chilly as I made my way out of the Portland area through the Columbia River Gorge.

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    To be continued: (I'll be right back)
    #11
  12. Flying Frisian

    Flying Frisian Born to Ride Supporter

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    I rode through Oregon in thick smoke, which finally cleared up a little at the Oregon - Idaho border. The video below shows some of the smoke covered scenery that I rode through.



    When I got to Twin Falls, I decided to stop for some food so I wouldn't have to cook when I got to the camp site. @Dons1911 texted us that he was doing the same.

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    After swallowing my sandwich, I continued for another hour until I reached the Sublett road exit. I was running low on fuel so I tried filling up at the only gas station at the exit. The store was closed and only one pump was working. It took several tries with my credit card to get some fuel in the tank and there was no receipt at the end. Hopefully I'll get charged only once.

    From the gas station it was about 10 miles to the campground via a dirt road. I ran into some deer on the way there and was going to film the ride in but my GOPRO battery was dead and I was too lazy to swap it. When I arrived at the campground, @Dons1911 was already there. @aftCG arrived several hours later in the dark, escorted by a lady in a Suburban. We're not exactly sure why he needed a support vehicle and we'll probably never know.

    It was a cold night in the tent. Little did we know that we would wish for some of that cold weather just a few days later.
    #12
  13. Flying Frisian

    Flying Frisian Born to Ride Supporter

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    Day 2 started chilly, but it warmed up quickly when the sun rose above the mountains. Made some instant coffee and Mountain House breakfast before packing up the tent. We rode the dirt road back to the gas station at the Malta exit, where we contacted @Utrider1 (Roy) who was going to meet us near Salt Lake City. We met up with @Utrider1 at a gas station and talked for a while. Roy led us through SLC to highway 6 where we separated ways.
    Thanks Roy, it was good to see you again!
    We continued on Hwy-6 via Helper and Price until we got to the I-70. Via the I-70 east we reached Green River, where we took the 191 south to Moab. We met @Mooney 78865 at a bank parking lot in Moab. It was a long ride to get to Moab, but we all made it safely.
    Now let the fun begin!
    The video below shows some of the scenery between Malta, ID and Moab, UT. Sorry for the crappy editing and wind noise. The video for the next few days will be edited but it will be a while before that's done.

    #13
  14. Dons1911

    Dons1911 Long timer

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    I left home on Saturday morning around 6 AM. New tires, new soft panniers, and great expectations all onboard! It was chilly at home, and I didn't see temps over 50 degrees for several hours. But how can one be cold when their headed to the desert to reunite with his DV ride-mates? As aftCG said, we checked in around lunch and rode on. I stopped at a diner that was out of food. Imagine that, a diner that is out of food! Oh well, I met a super nice guy and his son on the sidewalk outside the diner, he gave me directions to a great little cafe in Snowville, Utah. If it wasn't 90+ degrees there is no way I'd go to a place called Snowville! At least not on purpose!



    He also gave me some great directions up over the mountain to get from the cafe to the campground. Took an hour and a half instead of the 25 minutes of interstate! I was ahead of aftCG and the Frisian, so after my burger at Mollie's I was off to go over the mountain.
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    Great times, two-tracks and freshly plowed fields and open range mountain roads. So I arrived at the campground and set up camp.
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    A 'local' told me the closest cell service is about three miles up the road at the reservoir. I told myself I'd give it about 20 minutes then go to the reservoir to check messages for an update on the guys. Just a few minutes later I heard a bike coming. I walked out into the clearing and sure enough, here came the Frisian. He sits that Africa Twin of his very well! So we yaked for a while then he set up camp. Later on we decided to turn in and then, yup, that's right. The unmistakable sound of, well, you know. aftCG was being escorted to camp by an armed gal in a suburban. He set up camp, ate, drank wine, and it was bed time.

    We rolled out in the morning on the run to Moab to meet Mooney. But our resident STUD had to stop and lite some busty blondes smoke first. Not that I'm complaining, I rather enjoyed watching her bra work overtime trying to contain her...well, 'nuff said. Then we rode off to meet @Utrider1 at a gas station in Brigham City for a much appreciated escort thru the madness that is Salt Lake City!



    So I'm home after 2747 miles! Showered, fed, and off to mow the yard. More later...
    #14
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  15. Flying Frisian

    Flying Frisian Born to Ride Supporter

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    I don't know, Teletubbies?
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    #15
  16. Mooney 78865

    Mooney 78865 Long timer

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    Day 3
    The White Rim...
    Once we had set up camp at the Moab KOA, we as a group sat down and discussed the upcoming weeks travel plans. Initially I believe our thoughts were to ride the bikes "loaded" and find whatever camping accommodations we could at the end of each days riding. After discussing riding the White Rim it was agreed that the expectation of doing the complete ride and actually getting back somewhere other than where we started was a bit unrealistic. So the decision was made to spend two nights at the KOA in Moab, leaving our gear there for the next day's ride.
    Monday dawned clear, not a cloud in the sky. Forecast highs were in the upper 80's to low 90's. Bear in mind we were riding at altitude as well. This will play a part in the days adventure.
    I have ridden the White Rim twice before, once on a KLR, spending the night at Whitecrack camp about half way through the White Rim, and again on my KTM 990 which the ride was done in a day. (Long day) Both times were done solo. So I knew what lie ahead in a manner of speaking. First, let me tell you the White Rim is a once in a lifetime experience, if nothing but for the views. I am fascinated by the terrain and the desolation/isolation. To me, this is what Adventure riding is all about. I was ecstatic to share the grandeur of what I believe is some of the most stunning landscape on the planet, with like minded mates from the DV ride in January.
    I have ridden a number of the Back Country Discovery routes and am familiar with multi day off road rides, what to bring, how to pace, ETC. I know everyone had an excellent time in DV. The mind set for me in DV was completely different than I had for the WABDR, or this trip for that matter. DV was always going to be out and back, short excursions. This trip wasn't going to be that way, at all.
    Stopping at the local Mc Donald's for breakfast we headed to Canyonlands NP to pick up our day use permit for the WRT. I believe we actually hit the trail about 10:00 am, a little late but manageable. One of the guys asked the Ranger how long to do the White Rim. The reply was 15 hours in a 4WD and 8 hours on a bike. Sounded about right...
    We set off from the Shaffer Switchbacks about a mile back from the visitor center, Alex, @aftCG wanted a pic from the same spot I had taken one that I keep posting on the forum. That was our first of multiple stops.
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    Once we arrived at Potash Junction, (base of the switchbacks) we headed out in earnest along the WRT. Conditions were/are what you would expect. Bumpy hard rock shelfs, two track jeep tracks, sand, silt, gravel, dust, pretty much desert conditions. But the views are majestic! If your bored with what's in front, turn around, whole different perspective. We all switched leading at one point or another, (can't really get lost) and things went well for the first 20 miles or so. We made multiple stops for pics, most notably Muscleman Arch. (I of course didn't take a pic of the arch!) Our pace was good and things seemed to be clicking along....
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    Right up to the point they weren't. By now we had been riding for about 2.5 to 3 hours, in 90 degree heat, at altitude with no cover, zero, in full ADV gear. Hydration was beginning to play a part in the day's activities. Specifically the lack of.
    Here is where it gets sticky, I'm from central CA, I routinely ride a road bicycle after work in 100 degree heat. I like to think I have an understanding on how my body reacts to heat as well as strenuous exercise in the heat. My partners are from the pacific northwest, and are not acclimated to the heat. Throw in prolonged riding in challenging off-road conditions, in the heat, at altitude, things can get out of hand with out you really realizing it. Heat exhaustion can and will come on fast. I should have recognized the signs when people were making unusual mistakes. Bikes were being dropped where they should not have been. Focus had become an issue. Unfortunately we are all guys with A type personalities and think we can work through things. By the time we actually truly realized that a couple of us were in deficit, it was pretty advanced, and extreme measures were needed.
    What finally brought the group to it's senses was a fairly steep, blown up, pitch up, about half way through the ride. I was lucky enough to be in the lead. Also lucky enough to clear the climb, on the pegs. The next two didn't. @Flying Frisian did come up and join me, and we headed down to retrieve the other bikes. There was no way we were going to be able to continue. At this point we had bikes that had been down multiple times, and riders at the brink of collapse. While you may think picking up an Adventure bike is not really a huge deal for a couple of people, do it 5-6 times in the heat in the span of an hour or so, usually on a hillside where it needs to be walked backwards. It will suck the life out of you.
    While we began recovering the two downed bikes we got one under cover of a rock shelf with a space blanket (That is going in my kit!) with water in an effort to get some sort of recovery. During this whole adventure we were lucky enough to meet a couple fellow travelers riding sag for a mountain bike tour company. They graciously gave us water (I downed as much of mine as I could when they came, and refilled) electrolytes, candy was offered (need sugar to absorb water) fruit, and were gracious enough to let a couple of us sit in the air conditioning of their truck. It feels like the whole episode took 30 minutes, but in reality I think we were stopped for 2-3 hours. I really don't remember. There are so many things going through my head as I write this that we did wrong, and a lot of things we did right. I should have seen the signs of heat exhaustion when I started seeing bikes go down. I didn't, I focused on how I was feeling not realizing the others were not acclimated to the conditions and passed it off crappy tire choices. In hind sight, we should have pulled the plug long before that last climb. But we had a case of "get there itus" that lead us down a rabbit hole....
    I'm going to stop here and let some of the others post up their perspectives on the WRT. Like I said, it was epic, probably not for the right reasons. I think in the end, we got our shit in one bag. It could have been so, so, much worse. Bikes were damaged, none of us were. I do not like to think what the other possibilities could have been.
    And to add insult to injury, my bike had to be bump started. Fuc#*&g lovely day!
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    #16
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  17. Dons1911

    Dons1911 Long timer

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    We did the White Rim Trail? When?
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  18. aftCG

    aftCG Long timer

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    Yes, some very good lessons from this leg. First, we all planned for WABDR. We bought equipment for WABDR. All of us adopted soft bags instead of aluminum panniers because there was a good chance at least some of us would eat dirt (Let's face it, soft bags just take a punch better and are still usable).
    We all planned to be self sufficient and eat freeze dried trail food. Well the plan changed, but I left my house with exactly the same equipment, food and level of preparation. The only thing different was the destination.

    Mooney totally nailed it when he wrote about watching for signs. I'm from the land of boot dryers and toenail fungus. I'm trained to watch for hypothermia, not hyperthermia. People get wet and cold and they start fucking up at things they can normally do. Fresh on the bike, I could have made that pitch where we turned back.

    When we were riding at any speed there was sufficient air blowing through my vents to keep me comfortable. I started the morning with 3L of cool water in my camelback bladder and had been sipping on it at what I thought was a good pace. When we'd stop, we peeled off gloves, helmet and jackets and walk around in the sun. I was hot but not yet uncomfortable.

    I'll have to look at my InReach for the spot, but I had been on point for a while and came around edge of a canyon lip and up what looked like the road. Except it got narrow real quick and it was obvious I had dead ended us.
    Mooney got himself backed out and found the real road. I helped Frisian and Don horse their bikes through K turns in the sand until they were pointed down hill and then I got mine turned around. I still felt fine, having a good time and like I had plenty of energy. Little did I know, I had just dipped into my reserves. On my home turf that little bit of activity wouldn't phase me.

    The first time I went down, It was just after a switch back that wasn't particularly difficult. I had just completed the turn and, well, fucked up and went down. The bike was near the edge. I spun it so that it could be picked up, but if it was lifted right there it would likely have gone off the hill to the road below.
    I was last in line but I knew I was still within sight if anyone looked back, and they did.
    If I recall correctly it was there that Mooney discovered his starter wasn't working. He, Frisian and I got the bike upright and rolled back down the hill a little ways. I made it back up that turn to flat ground and then Frisian and I pushed Dan's bike down the hill so he could compression start it.
    We passed Don who had been waiting and then I recall a stretch of silt before we got to the pitch I never saw the top of. I didn't have the momentum I would have needed to carry me up on the tires I had. The road was rutted and the blue donkey needed more direction than I could give it at that moment. Down I went, on my right side, at the right edge of the road. It wasn't even completely on its side (maybe 60 degrees), but it was leaking gas.

    This time when I took my stuff off I was disappointed in my ability, I was tired, I was super hot, I could feel my face was flush, and I had the chills at the same time. That was when I remembered my knowledge of hypothermia, because we can have the sensation of warmth when it is implausible.

    My bike could wait. I needed to get some shade until Don caught up and we figured our group strategy. There were some big rocks on the inside of the bend and I attempted to get as much of myself as I could in the shade. It was less than half my body. I still had on my black Klim pants and my boots which were in full sun. So I pulled out my space blanket bivvy bag. Not the crinkly oven bag kind, but the ones we old farts remember the Apollo astronauts used (along with Tang). That blanket completely blocks the sun and is cool on the underside (just have it high enough that any air movement can get through under it. Between the small amount of shade and the space blanket I was in the shade and continuing to sip on my water and eat one of my weird protein bars.

    The Frisian had asked me how much water I had left but when he asked I was almost afraid to look, and didn't really have my shit together enough to check. After a while I could see a spot across the road and up the hill that had considerably more shade. I wanted to get there but I didn't have the energy to move yet. I could feel that my heart rate was in the 80s even though I was just laying there. It eventually returned to normal and I felt well enough to get to the shady spot I had been yearning for.
    It had the look of an ideal habitat for rattlesnakes so I chucked a few rocks in the the crevice and didn't provoke any objection. So I crawled up under there where I could get 99% of me in the shade. The face of the rock and the soft dirt under it were very cool to the touch, having not been hammered by the sun yet. Another huge benefit was pulling my boots off. I was finally able to check my water and had about 1L left, and I kept sipping it. My movement had elevated my heart rate again but a shorter rest and it went back down and I started feeling better.
    I can't tell you anything about how long it took. I know that Don showed up and set his bike gently on the ground just across from my bike, came forth with some expletives, and that Frisian's helmet bounced down a rock hill for what sounded like ten minutes (you wouldn't know by seeing it today).
    I was discouraged knowing that the road ahead had sections that were tougher than what I had just failed at, and that we weren't half way. I was stoked when the group decision was to turn around and head back out the way we came.
    Don attempted to pick his second fight of the day by calling a grown ass man "Natalie", but instead the guy gave us water and snacks. But along came the actual MTB sag wagon. It turned out that Natalie was real, and very pleasant. A couple of us got in their air conditioned extended cab truck where we ate tangerines, drank soda and ate sawdust bars. They made sure we had plenty of water and after a while we were on the bikes pointed back towards Shafer Canyon.

    I guess it's time to let go of some video and a pic or two.
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    Frisian above
    IMG_20200914_101803-01.jpeg Mooney shown above
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    Don is not in this picture.
    And this here video is still in rough draft form. It takes us from downtown Moab on a Monday morning, to the bottom of Shafer Canyon. I'll do something about the audio later.

    Next post I'll talk more about my gear and the thoughts I've had about it since.
    #18
  19. Dons1911

    Dons1911 Long timer

    Joined:
    May 24, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1,241
    Location:
    Hayden, Idaho
    Okay, I won 't clutter up the thread with my poor attempt at pics. Not when aftCG was there too!

    I will say that I profoundly underestimated the effect the heat and altitude would have on me. While I have lived in the desert, just outside Vegas for 16 years, I have been in north Idaho for 20 years now. Frisian and I were ahead of the other two when one of them went down. Frisian suggested I stay where we were and he'd ride back to check on them. He was gone a while, and I was about to turn around as well when a group of mountain bikers came by and told me they were coming. It wasn't long until they road past me. I geared up and started riding, only to notice a water bottle had been dropped by one of the cyclists. I stopped, picked it up and strapped it on my pannier. I start riding and am convinced I can catch up if I ride a bit faster. I probably could have caught up IF my skill level in the sand was adequate to accommodate said plan. Sadly, mine are not. I lost it in the deep sand and down we went. Now I have put this bike and my R12GS down a number of times and have always been able to pick it up. Heck, I lay every bike I've ever owned down in the garage on both sides and prove to myself that I CAN pick it up by myself before I take it off road. However, try though I may, I could not pick my bike up this time. I realized that I was not gonna get this up when that sharp pain in my lower back said, "Hey, remember me?" So that wicked feeling of defeat washed over me. Or rather I let that wicked feeling of defeat wash over me. I'm embarrassed to say that I allowed that feeling to determine the rest of my day. So a van load of Asian fella's stopped and helped me pick up my bike and saw me on my way. Thanks guys!!! So I catch up to the group a bit later, only to find one of us at the top of the hill with a bike that won't start, one of us waiting for me, and yet another one of us in a crevasse in the rock getting some shade while his bike lay on the side of the trail part way up the hill. Also, the water bottle bottle found it's rightful owner! I attempted the hill and well, didn't make it. While a little of the reason was tires, (I wish I could put more of the fault there, but I can't) I feel the biggest reason was my lack of dirt skill and the heat weighing on my decision making process. Okay, enough excuses. I was in over my head and without the rest of the teams help, I'd for sure be Buzzard chow.

    Not to take away from any of the team members, Frisian was awesome. He kept telling me we'll get out as a team. We are here for each other. Reminded me of Coach V, my freshman year cross county coach. What a great coach. Both of you!!! Thanks to all three of you. I learned a lot trying to keep the Frisian in sight. He and Mooney are pretty awesome in the dirt!

    Then the bicycle support truck came along piloted by Natalie. Oh Natalie... I'll left the others
    fill you in on the rest. But I'd like to leave you with the thought "NEVER underestimate the heat!"
    #19
  20. Dracula

    Dracula sagabona kunjani wena Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Oddometer:
    25,855
    Location:
    Dixie
    Guys, I absolutely love every single word I read from your sincere little hearts.. :raabia I feel as if I'm there..adrenaline pumping!
    #20
    borderlinebob and Flying Frisian like this.