Motocamp Cooking

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by dwtwp, Jun 28, 2019.

  1. dwtwp

    dwtwp Flying W California

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    What do you cook when motorcycle camping? Do you have a favorite motocamp meal? Looking for recipes that travel well for several days that I can try out and feature on video.

    For example this is a recent one on how to make Apple Cinnamon and Bacon Crepes at the campsite.

    I live in Livermore, CA. It is a short ride out to the Sierras, Yosemite and surrounding areas. Would enjoy some company while moto camping.


    Thank You

    Dave Wright

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  2. TripleTriples

    TripleTriples Been here awhile

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    Typically don't get fancy. You can make a pretty good meal out of a couple of hunks of meat, some cheese and fruit from the bestest grocery store.

    Cook on the fire and you'll have minimal dishes.
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  3. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Fritata, curries of various types, both easy to arrange and cook.
    Cooking can be hard without an adjustable simmer.

    I use a trangia, you get two pots and a fry pan in the set as well as stand and windshield. Everything stacks down small inside. The gas conversion allows an infinite variety of heat settings which many camp stoves don't.

    Where I camp in southern France, any flame must be easily and rapidly controllable for fire control in the normal summer drought conditions.
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  4. Marcham

    Marcham Been here awhile

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    Depends. Anything from steak on the fire (foiled potatoes in the coals) to dehydrated camping meals. Couscous is versatile, easy to season and works with everything.
    I used to get pretty fancy but I've now simplified my gear with a jetboil water boiler. I like to enjoy local foods once a day. Breakfast is usually porridge or eggs (fresh or dehydrated).
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  5. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

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  6. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    I know I have posted this on one or several of the similar threads, but still true.
    I only camp in southern France these days. I have a few favourite campsites which are mostly lost and lonely, which covers most of La France Profond if you can be arsed to get off motorways and main roads. Not isolated like somewhere in Kansas, but you are left alone, but with access to facilities, hot shower, flushing toilet, potable water standpipes. Maybe a fridge or freezer in the office/farmers barn along side a functional washing machine to wash off the barbarque grease you dribbled down your only clean shirt. Yes, a "chimenie" is a common sight, you can then be more adventourous and set your sights higher.

    Almost all butchers and suermarkets will have a rotissarie. Depending on the region, lamb or pork may also be on offer, along with the gravy and poasted potatoes. Usually not too expensive, the common options are size of course, but also "fermier" what we would call organic. The small could feed a hungry person on its own - but I have made stock from the carcase for a soup the following day.
    Rural markets are full of local produce, and seasonal too. No asparagus in November or strawberries at xmas. Almost everywhere the market will have a dairy stall, for cheese and butter - goats cheese tends to be on its own.
    On slightly bigger roads there are many roadside produce stalls. Usually a farmer and his own stuff. In high season, you can see people on their own with piles of melons or peaches or other fruit, Where I go, these folk are often students eking out a bit of extra cash through the holiday.

    If you are in a village, there will be bread. After a steep decline, bread in France is improving again. While there are many great and passionate artisan bakers, the big chains are appropriating the names and style of the more boutique operations, you soon come to recognise the mis-sell.

    Armed with good bread, and maybe a pastry for desert, you can hunt for produce and protein. The market, or shops on non market days, will provide nice juicy fruit and crisp vegetables. Cheese is very common, from the freshest goat to the ripest Roquefort and everything in between. Charcuitier will provide all sorts of prepared meats, dozens of pates and sausages - cooked, cured, dried or smoked from almost every sort of animal you can think of Aine - donkey to all the zebra/alligator/ostrich/kangaroo but the star is usually based on pork and sanglier (wild boar).
    I find space in my top box for a jar of cornichon, which are little pickles. The acidity complements the richness of the meats wonderfully.
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  7. Schmokel

    Schmokel Key to Happiness: Low Expectations

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    Anything that I can add boiled water to. But really only for a "snack" before bed. Otherwise, I'll hit up a quick gas station or grill on the way. On my trip to Madawaska ME last year, I pulled into a seafood restaurant. Over a 2h wait! Pulled into a gas station that had cooked burgers. Bought a bacon double cheeseburger and a can of beer for about $6. Ate at the campsite. It was perfect.
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  8. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    I've been cooking with potatoes a lot recently. They travel well (though bulky), they're cheap, they're nutritious.

    My best cheap, easy, and healthy motocamp breakfast:

    One small russet (not sure if you have Russet potatoes, just a standard Idaho {damn, you probably don't have those either}) potato, or half a full sized baking potato, cut into cubes 1-2cm.
    1/4 bell pepper, cubed
    1/4 jalapeño pepper, chopped
    2 eggs
    cheddar cheese

    First, blanch the potato cubes in boiling water for 5-7 minutes, then drain.
    Heat a saucepan with a bit of oil, butter, or bacon grease.
    Add potatoes and saute on high heat for a couple of minutes.
    Lower heat and add peppers for a few minutes.
    Crack eggs and add to the saucepan.
    Add cheese.
    Continue to turn and stir until egg/cheese mixture is cooked to your preference.

    All the ingredients (potatoes, peppers, eggs, cheese) will keep unrefrigerated for several days.

    Jamie
    #8
  9. bikerfish

    bikerfish flyfishandride

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    I've made pizza over the campfire before, I even posted some pics here a while ago. Used my MSR pots and pan to do it, fresh dough, sauce, cheese, other toppings, etc. It was easy, especially over a fire, I've done it on the MSR stove before, THAT takes some skill, can go from uncooked to burnt in about 17 seconds!:lol3

    I usually do some type of breakfast scramble, I stop the night before and grab what I want, eggs, meat, cheese, potatoes, etc, cook it all up. I enjoy cooking in camp, most of the time, I'm not in too much of a hurry, and it's part of the experience. I always enjoy a couple cups of good camp coffee in the morning no matter if I cook breakfast or not!
    I've also done steaks over the fire(awesome!!) with potatoes or rice, and maybe a veggie.
    There is no limit to what can be done, just use your imagination, anything that can be made at home can be cook in camp, somehow, someway.
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  10. Neville1111

    Neville1111 n00b

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    Dave

    I live in San Ramon and have started this year MotoCamping with my daughter and boyfriend. Just came back from Samual P. Taylor on Saturday and Gualala on Sunday. 400 miles three days lots of fun but tiring.
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  11. AdventureTrail

    AdventureTrail Wannabe Adventurer and YouTuber

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    My wife and I are fans of Mountain House meals (breakfast skillet FTW) for quick food at camp, but for us part of our trip is sampling local foods and restaurants. It also saves us having to bring a ton of cookware. When we travel 2-up, space is already at a premium so we just budget money for eating out when applicable. When solo camping, I will sometimes bring a variety of light snack foods and a couple different meals that can be made on my GSI soloist cookset.
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  12. jeffmackvision

    jeffmackvision Boob man Supporter

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    I often bring a steak to camp from a local store. I clean off a nice flat stone and place in the fire. The seer is perfect.... I always travel with McCormick’s Montreal steak seasoning. That’s it. I agree ... keep it simple and dish free.
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  13. abruzzi

    abruzzi Long timer

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    First mistake I made was trying to pack actual eggs. I bought a plastic carton for holding the eggs, but with the quality of the terrain, half the eggs still cracked.

    Instead, look for those low cholesterol eggs that come in a pourable cardboard carton. You can only make scrambled eggs with them, but they’ll survive 50 miles of single track much better than real eggs.
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  14. gmk999

    gmk999 ____ as a Rotax

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    I bring them hard boiled.. Easy peasy breakfast/ snack. they travel well and checkmark a healthy food box on my meal list
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  15. abruzzi

    abruzzi Long timer

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    That works too, but I’m not sure I can make huevos rancheros with hard boiled eggs...
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  16. msjesscat

    msjesscat Adventurer

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    Some good ideas here! My boyfriend precooks meat and freezes it in a container, along with small bags of sauces/spices/onions etc and then heats that up for first or even second night (depending on climate etc). I also sometimes make up those meal replacement drinks (just add hot or cold water) and if I am tired or feeling unwell it gives me what I need. Sometimes tinned tuna with pasta. There are some good freeze dried options out there also.
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  17. Menhir

    Menhir Been here awhile

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    For eggs, look up Ova Easy.
    Just add water and cook.
    They actually taste like eggs, too.

    No need to refrigerate, and whatever you don't use can be stored away for the next trip.
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  18. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Buying fresh veg from farm stalls and you can make a sort of ratatouille with what ever it is you have, regardless of any recipe. The side of the road places are happy to sell one of anything, not just huge "economy" packs.

    A cooking machine like a trangia makes this very simple - comes with two bowls and a frypan. A gas conversion make simmering easy and economical.

    I have a small pot of salt and a smaller one of pepper. Easy enough to buy olive oil in situ anywhere.

    I went with a raw friend who took eggs in one of those purpose build plastic boxes, I think a 60% catastrophy rate. I rarely buy eggs when travelling, but have found they survive best in those pulp cardboard clamshell 6 packs that farmers use, a few rubberbands wrapped round help too. But best not tempt fate, buy as close to your destination as possible.

    Travelling in France, there is always decent bread available somewhere. A market or road side stall or even specialist fromargerie can provide some fresh cheese, probably fresh fruit too.
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  19. LashLarue

    LashLarue Been here awhile

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    Easy breakfast for me: tortillas, spam and scrambled eggs. I have not had the problems with broken eggs. I take a boy scout mess kit and boil water for tea or coffee. Then I wrap the mess kit pan on both sides with foil. Coat the foil covered pan with oil of your choice and cook cut up pieces of a SPAM single. Remove. Cook scrambled eggs, add SPAM back and at the end toss a tortilla on top.

    This packs small, does not need refrigeration, and the cleanup is just removing the foil and tossing it out.
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  20. RandyM

    RandyM Less talk, More ride

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    I try to minimize cooking. I like granola and either rice milk or coconut milk for breakfast. For lunch I either pick up something like a sandwich, or just eat at a café or fast food. I found flat breads like pita bread or Nan bread holds up better than regular bread on trips. I buy packets of tuna salad or get a small cup of tuna or chicken salad at a supermarket deli. Pita bread is kind of dry for my taste, so I usually go for trader joes flat bread. I have also ate salads directly out of a ziplock bag with disposable chopsticks. I try to avoid frying and any foods that are hard to clean off pans. Whenever shopping for food, I keep an eye out for things that are easy to cook while camping. There are a lot of foods in plastic pouches, intended for microwave, that can just be dumped into a pot and heated up.

    I avoid things that use a lot of energy to cook like rice and dried beans since I use a small backpacker camp stove.
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