Motocamp Cooking

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by dwtwp, Jun 28, 2019.

  1. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,281
    Location:
    Maine
    @nickguzzi described the European practices. The USDA requires eggs to be washed. Their assumption is that all flocks are infected with salmonella so salmonella will be on the outside of enough eggs to justify washing. Washing eggs, however, removes the protective membrane that's on the shell, so washed eggs should be refrigerated. The same goes for eggs removed from their shells.

    In the '60s and '70s, I camped with whole eggs and eggs in a jar for the morning after the first night. That was also back when eating raw eggs from the supermarket was considered safe. These days it seems there are much easier and safer ways to have breakfast.
    #41
    WDG likes this.
  2. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,654
    Location:
    below the sea
    Somehow, refrigerated eggs are harder for me to do an egg liason. Mayonnaise and hollandaise are much easier with eggs that have never been chilled, even when allowed to come up slowly to room temperature.
    IME. YMMV.

    Not having to chill the eggs means tiny shops in out of the way places can have some eggs for sale, not using up expensive cooled chiller space.

    When I went through Turkey 50 years ago, out in the boonies you could only get hard boiled eggs. No idea if that is still the case.
    H-B eggs are pretty durable and versatile. Not to mention a great source of protein.
    #42
  3. Hot Stuff

    Hot Stuff Road Dragon

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    489
    Location:
    The Land of Morning Calm
    Someone above suggested a Nalgene bottle. I like to use a vacuum bottle (Thermos), its insulating properties will help keep the eggs fresh longer.
    #43
  4. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,906
    Location:
    captures.crunching.farewell
    I don't like to cook anything other than boiled water when moto-camping. My space is limited and I like to keep my ruck as light as possible. Also, I don't like to pack all the extra stuff needed to prepare and clean up after a real cooked meal. I mostly try and find food when I stop for gas, but here are some tricks for times I know food is scarce.

    Instant coffee - I think the Starbuck's Via is about as small and as light as it gets for coffee. Add the coffee to the cup before adding hot water. If you try and add the packet to a steaming cup of water, the steam from the water makes the coffee clump up in the packet.
    Trailmix - I mix beef jerky, salted almonds, dried fruits, and some sort of gummy-bear. Protein, fats, carbs and salts. This is what I eat for most breakfasts and snacks.
    Dehydrated meals - I usually pack a couple of these on every ride. I prefer Wise, but Mountain house has some meals that aren't too bad. I clean the Mylar bags and save them for later. I can remove a meal from its packaging and put it in a zip-lock bag, then just re-use the same mylar bag to rehydrate and heat the meal. Save a little weight, but saves a lot of space. All the salt in dehydrated meals is helpful if I have been sweating a lot that day.
    MREs - if I have space, I will throw in an MRE. They do not require a stove to heat up. I don't think they taste as good as a Mountain House type meal, but each meal offers a little more variety than a single dehydrated meal - they usually come with some chocolate, coffee, sugar, salt, matches, dessert and a drink mix. I think if you were to compare calories/oz of MREs vs. dehydrated meals and a stove, the dehydrated meals would offer more calories/oz of gear, especially the more days one is out...MREs are pretty heavy and generate a lot more trash that needs to be packed out.
    Tuna packets and string cheese - lots of flavors of tuna and cheeses. I dump the tuna and cheese into a tortilla. Good protein in the tuna/cheese and the tortilla is full of fats and carbs. Tortillas pack well and won't spoil quickly.
    Vacuum sealer - I take leftover food at home, vacuum seal it, then freeze it. I put the frozen meals into my ruck before I leave the house. When I want to heat it up, I re-purpose the mylar bags, add boiling water to the bag, add the vacuum-sealed meal, seal it and wait about 10 minutes and it's piping hot. This process adds weight as the food is not dehydrated, but it's nice to have a real meal at camp. Once hot, I just cut open the vacuum bag and pour the contents into a tortilla. One needs to be careful with this process as some bacteria can grow in food even if is vacuum-sealed. I use this method for the first night, maybe a second, but not beyond that. Alternatively, one could make a variety of uncooked meals at home, vacuum-seal them at home, then just pour the contents into whatever cooking vessel you use at camp. All the spices, herbs, and even the cooking oil could be added to the bag before sealing it, saving space on things needed to prepare the meal. Important to keep the raw meats separate from raw veggies and starches. Again, I don't think this method would be good for multiple days due to bacterial growth; although the cooking process will kill the bacteria, some bacteria, while alive, will produce toxins that are not removed by the cooking process.
    Processed meats - things like Spam and sausages will be safe to eat, even if not stored in a fridge, for many days if the package is not opened.
    #44
    TheBritAbroad likes this.
  5. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,654
    Location:
    below the sea
    A trick I learned in India, they didn't have dishsoap where I was. They used a spoonful of ash (camel shit was the only fuel, but sterile after combustion) and a few drops of water to scour and neutralise the grease. Rinse, no soap or effort required.
    If like me you can't set a fire due to wild fire restrictions, a small scoop of dirt does the job almost as well.

    But I grew up when a cut or graze was licked and a leaf held over to stop the bleeding.
    #45
  6. DirtyOldMan

    DirtyOldMan Motorsickle enthusiast

    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Oddometer:
    2,592
    Location:
    Cass Co MO
    These are actually tasty. Way better than Mt House. I like to catch a meal when going through a town but these are great for if you can’t or are just having too much fun to find civilization.
    9426607A-412E-43BC-8800-51D5CC068E0B.jpeg
    #46
    tjzondrz likes this.
  7. 32dgrz

    32dgrz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2017
    Oddometer:
    134
    Location:
    Ankeny Iowa
    #47
    AstheMagpieFlies and RJAMT like this.
  8. Cromoth

    Cromoth fan of the magic carpet ride

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,125
    Location:
    MA
    Sounds great. Maybe boil a shot of water to steam clean before next cook.
    #48
    nickguzzi likes this.
  9. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    7,654
    Location:
    below the sea
    I have no need, ash, even from camel or donkey shit will be sterile fresh from a fire.
    I also enjoy Valencay goat's cheese with cinders. I am probably immune, in fact I find the cheese settles any bug I may have from eating mussels or andouillette (intestine sausage).
    #49
  10. goosecreek

    goosecreek A day late and a dollar short. Supporter

    Joined:
    May 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,722
    Location:
    One foot out the door.
    Anything I can foil-pack. I try to buy local as I go if possible.
    #50
  11. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,309
    Location:
    .
  12. taosgsr

    taosgsr Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    531
    Location:
    Just south of 37, La Plata, NM
    Minute rice. One can red beans. Cubed up kielbasa. Hot sauce. Boom Dinner.
    #52
  13. taosgsr

    taosgsr Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2009
    Oddometer:
    531
    Location:
    Just south of 37, La Plata, NM
    Another easy one, a bag of Knorr pasta sides, Alfredo flavored. One can of cooked chicken. Poof! chicken Alfredo.
    #53
  14. Plaka

    Plaka Brevis illi vita est

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    6,309
    Location:
    .
    The Knorr stuff is very heavy on salt and additives. I don't even eat it at home. Then look at the label on that canned chicken. It's canned in "broth", ie, more salt.
    #54
  15. mnmlst

    mnmlst mnmlst

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    1,826
    Location:
    a Pangean remnant
    Packet of instant mashed potatoes, can/packet of diced ham, boom... dinner.

    Also, a couple long, high quality, stainless kabob skewers go a long way with locally acquired fare on a small fire... cut up a good steak, pepper, onion, tomato. You can stab lots of things for roasting and clean up is minimal. The take zero space.

    Basmati rice with lemon pepper and a couple of those pre-packaged butter pats.

    Heavy, but a proper, small (9”) round, cast iron griddle with the handle ground off packs ok and cooks all sorts of stuff on the stove or fire. Well seasoned and a little bottle of peanut oil keeps it going with almost zero clean up - It is the pot lid. Pair it with a quality, solid, stainless short order ‘flipper’ and sharpen one side for chopping.... stir fry, cheese steaks, pancakes, grilled cheese, etc.
    #55
  16. IMLST_AZ

    IMLST_AZ Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Oddometer:
    386
    Location:
    Arizona
    1 cup instant mashed potatoes
    1/2 cup instant stuffing
    Spoonful of powdered gravy mix
    Combine in a 1qt ziplock "freezer" bag
    Boil about 1-1/2 cups water and and dump in the bag, stir. While that sits, open a can or packet of chicken and dump in. Stir and eat.
    BOOM... Thanksgiving dinner in about 5 minutes. Wipe off your spork with your shirt when you are done eating and zip the baggie closed, clean up is done. Now enjoy the camp fire with a flask of your favorite hooch.
    #56
    DirtyOldMan and Grinnin like this.
  17. gweaver

    gweaver NorCal is Best Cal! Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,406
    Location:
    Sonoma County, CA
    Dumplings add bulk to any sort of soup by mixing up a batch of Bisquick or Jiffy pancake mix, seasoned to taste. I use this with Knorr veggie soup mix, but I'm sure there are other flavors this would work with. Just pre-pack your pancake mix in a ziplock bag, add water and mix. Use a spoon to drop spoonfuls of it in your boiling soup, let the dumplings cook for 3-4 minutes and enjoy.

    If you have a good Asian market nearby, there's a Chinese dried shredded pork- looks kinda like shredded tree bark, but it's delicious. Add that to a bowl of miso soup, and it adds considerable bulk and flavor. Mixes great in to rice or add some to sauteed veggies. This is the stuff-
    [​IMG]

    G
    #57
    pceire32, TheBritAbroad and nvklr like this.
  18. Big D

    Big D Sunny SoCal

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2007
    Oddometer:
    310
    Location:
    Grand Terrace, Ca
    I have always had good luck with the yellow 6 egg holder, spam singles dehydrated hash browns , craisins, raisins and a diced up mixture of dried fruit added to oatmeal. lunch is sardines, cheese, summer sausage, apples, granola bars, maybe raman noodles with extra dehydrated veges ,always have jar of peanut butter and jelly on torts or pita bread. Might sound awful, canned raviolis with a can of green beans added, tuna helper, mac and cheese, canned beef stew with green beans. Dry pasta sides with packaged tuna, peperoni works too. Can pack fresh broccoli, squash and peppers. Canned items may seem heavy but the water needed to rehydrate food is heavy also. Seems like water takes up as much space as the food when dry camping. Nice to have big GSA to carry all your stuff. Look forward to spring to get out. Check out U-tube backpack meals form grocery store. enjoy 07GSA sunny SoCal
    #58
    TheBritAbroad likes this.
  19. rihaha

    rihaha Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2019
    Oddometer:
    20
    Location:
    Elko, MN
    Canned tuna or packets make a great quick meal. If I can I like to use a pie iron over a fire. You can get real creative there. Otherwise it is dehydrated meals. When by a river of fresh water source I use a MSR water filter and fill my Nalgene. Camp Chow makes some good meals but got to watch which ones have a lot of sodium, they have some good options that are not too saturated with it though. https://www.campchow.org/#/ Made for the Boundary Water area in Northern Minnesota. This is what we do when camping out of the kayak. Haven't actually loaded up a bike yet but I'm sure I could figure out a way to get most things to fit. I need more free time...
    #59
    tjzondrz likes this.
  20. AustinRT

    AustinRT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2014
    Oddometer:
    292
    Location:
    San Maros, Tx
    Ok i'll bite what is a pie iron?
    #60