Motoport Kevlar first impressions (long, many pics...)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Gringo, May 18, 2005.

  1. Hikertrash

    Hikertrash Wasted Rock Ranger

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    There's no need to. Set it and forget it.
  2. MrDusk

    MrDusk Uh.

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    Just thought I would add my $.02 to this awesome thread.

    After about eight months of not being able to decide I finally pulled the trigger on some Kevlar Street Jeans. I could not be happier I did!

    I have a multi month trip coming up in June and I am trying to be careful with my funds. Finding the balance between cash on hand and gear upgrades. MY Motoport Kevlar Jeans fall in the splurge category at just under $550 shipped with several options and a few custom upgrades added on.

    Having owned and worn out two pair of Firstgear Overpants and a couple of different brands of kevlar riding jeans, I was looking for the end-all, be-all. Finding a good fit can be a challenge too being 6'4" and wearing a 34x36 jean. I was looking for something that would be tolerable in the summer heat, has some rain protection, and not fugly.

    Suffice it to say the Motoport Kevlar Jeans seem just about perfect. They are very comfortable and do fit very well. (They got the "rear view" approval from the girlfriend.) I would actually say that they probably fit better and are more comfortable than the Levi jeans I sent in. And I really do feel protected too. (Some additional info: 1. the stretch kevlar is made with the "Coolblack" technology and 2. according to Motoport will withstand a 30 minute shower on an unfired bike.)

    I requested a couple of custom mods that came out very well. One of the kevlar lined jeans I have owned were the Diamond Gusset brand riding jeans and there were a couple of features from these that I wanted in my Motoport Jeans. A diamond gusset in the crotch (duh), left side coin pocket and a right side d-ring. Wayne was very accommodating, even taking the time to explain that diamond gusset is unnecessary because of the stretch kevlar, but I could have it if I wanted. I wanted and I am glad I did. All the mods plus the extra length, cargo pockets, and the zip velcro cuff came out well and I am super pleased. Very well made. Did I mention they are super comfortable?

    On top of it the turn around was super quick! The jeans arrived two weeks sooner than I expected! (YMMV of course. I got lucky in my timing I think.) I placed my order on March 18th and they arrived at my door on April 7th.

    Well there you go. Thumbs up on the Motoport Kevlar Street Jeans.
  3. pHudson

    pHudson still riding

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    ...from a new member in OZ.

    I have the Marathon stretch kevlar jacket and love it. I'm in the market for some pants that will work as year round gear here in Sydney. I have some cold weather pants, so these wouldn't be needed in the absolute worst conditions (meaning our mild Sydney conditions), but would be my go-to pants for most rides. So I'm considering the Ultra II in mesh kevlar, but I keep hearing really good things about the cordura jeans. Factors for me are:
    1) I don't want to spend more money than necessary and the cordura is almost $200 less with the same pads.
    2) I tend to feel the cold, so have doubts about mesh--plus they say that the cordura breathes pretty well.
    3) I hate the thought of over-pants. I mostly want to ride with either a pair of compression shorts/bike shorts or silk longjohns under the Motoport gear.

    Any thoughts?
  4. ssevy

    ssevy retired and riding the backroads

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    I have the overpants in stretch, and they do breathe, but due to the amount of surface area covered by armor, they don't flow air in some places. They are very comfortable on the bike, but quite a lot to walk in. The jeans look great, but once you add the quad armor, you are in the same boat as the Ultra 2's, without as much functionality. While a pair of jeans with the tri armor would be less bulky and more comfortable off the bike, I won't give up the extra protection of the quad armor. While I have not crashed, I have friends who have, and for me the best protection is paramount to everything else.
  5. pHudson

    pHudson still riding

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    Thanks for your thoughts. I'm not planning on quad. So the main variables are cordura or mesh kevlar. I keep going back and forth. I still haven't ruled out stretch, but the price movement from cordura to stretch is more than double--all with the same tri-armor.
  6. Okie Preacher

    Okie Preacher Long timer

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    I have the air-mesh overpants with the quad-armor. Really like them. When commuting to the office I just pull them over my slacks. When touring I either wear something like Under Armor or a pair of shorts depending on the conditions. Very versatile.

    For the long term, I would bite the bullet and go with the protection of Kevlar over the cordura. You won't regret it.
  7. 1-3-2-4

    1-3-2-4 Been here awhile

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    Agreed. My stretch kevlar pants are very comfy, even with the quad armor. Despite the comprehensive armor, I've found the stretch kevlar breathes VERY well. It's going to be warm in direct sunlight or while stopped, but you'll need something under/over it under 50F on longer rides.
  8. pHudson

    pHudson still riding

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    Do the pants have any zipper vents? My jacket vents work well, but I can't see any on the Ultra II stretch pants. And are your stretch pants the Ultra II or something else?

    Also, I would probably never wear these below 60F. Sydney's weather tends to be 80s in summer and 65 to 75 in winter--if the sun is shining. If it isn't, I most likely won't be riding. I work across the street from home, so this isn't for commuting, it is only for recreational rides. I am considering mesh kevlar because it is cheaper, but went with stretch for the jacket because I rarely get all that hot when I'm moving. The only cross-desert tour I've done in Australia was in the height of summer so I wore a Joe Rocket Phoenix jacket: if I ever noticed the weather it was because I was much too cold, not because I was hot. I wore my rain jacket over the Phoenix almost the entire trip to block the wind and was still cold.

    Another question: hip pads--yes or no?
  9. 1-3-2-4

    1-3-2-4 Been here awhile

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    Yes, I have the Ultra II Stretch. No vents, which kinda sucks on a day-to-day basis, but honestly, unless the temps get over 85F, I'm pretty comfy. If you only ride 65-85 or so, you'll be A-OK.
  10. TarTripper

    TarTripper Been here awhile

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    I've had the mesh Kevlar pants for seven years now. They're better than new because I've properly broken them in! In 7 years, nothing has broken, and no stitching loose.

    I never wear anything more than jeans underneath and in the summer I only wear shorts. I've never been too hot in the summer but occasionally in the winter with temps just below zero I had a waterproof outer layer for some wind proofing.

    I can't recommend them highly enough.
  11. ssevy

    ssevy retired and riding the backroads

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    Hip armor is not very thick. Not sure it would offer much real protection.
  12. funinthesun

    funinthesun Been here awhile

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    Found a new way to wash my suit.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It was 108 out. And suit is nice and clean now


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  13. econwatch

    econwatch Been here awhile Supporter

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    Perfect! Wore a hydro vest last summer down BRP / Cherohala. Earned the name 'wetsuit'. Anything to keep cool. Suit w quad armour feels like definition of protection.

    [​IMG]
  14. Bike Nomad

    Bike Nomad Been here awhile

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    I don't know about the fabrics/thread/materials used in the Motoport--but just as a heads up, the chlorine in pools tends to prematurely age fabrics (swimsuits, SCUBA gear, PFDs) with repeated exposure (I'm sure your one time dip there won't be an issue--but I wouldn't make a habit of it).
  15. funinthesun

    funinthesun Been here awhile

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    Ya im sure thats true. I called motoport about it after i did it a week or so ago and asked what they thought. There response was that they dont know if it would break down the kevlar material but were pretty sure it could cause the color to fade faster. Don't thunk it will be a regular thing but the armor and suit sure worked well as a pfd. ;)


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  16. DEdge

    DEdge Adventurer

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    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    I chose the police pant http://tinyurl.com/lddq6kf with the mesh kevlar and have ridden in 50-110 F on the isle of Hispaniola. I went with the quad armor in all but the tail bone. Below 60 it feels too cold but could be handled with long johns. For me it has been perfect for 60-85F.

    For your climate, I would get the mesh kevlar. Another nice thing about the mesh is that you also dry off faster - particularly useful for tropical downpours. I rode into a thunderstorm last week - flash floods and all. (no way out) and arrived soaked. The mesh usually dries on me riding in the breeze but the stretch-kevlar needs more time. - even so next morning left a fan blowing air through the stretch kevlar components. Next morning all dry and ready to ride.

    I find that the zipper cuffs for hot weather are also helpful to open when stopped for cooling.

    Hip pads, for me - yes. On the lower legs with the zipper cuffs looks good, upper legs and back looks bulky, but feel that the protection is worth the small sacrifice.

    YMMV
  17. CantThinkOfaUserName

    CantThinkOfaUserName n00b

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    I just bought the ultra ii mesh kevlar jacket and pants used off ebay by a guy who had my exact dimensions.

    But it's the hi viz color up top and gray on the bottom.

    Wondering if anyone has dyed or painted the mesh kevlar a different color and what were the results.

    I.e. Did the color change to what you wanted? Was breathability affected? Etc.

    Thanks ahead of time for any info.
  18. dustin2

    dustin2 VFR800

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    I have a friend who wears Motoport kevlar jacket & pants and I witnessed him strike a deer and go down. The gear worked very, very well and I have had Motoport on my mind ever since.

    I wear a Roadcrafter at the moment but am looking to replace it with something slimmer fitting, nicer looking and better protected. I've been reading this thread for hours but am still puzzled by some of the function of the Motoport suits.

    Here's my question:

    The one thing I like best about my Roadcrafter one piece is the Gore-Tex liner and the absolute ease of use it offers. Much like my TCX Gore-Tex boots and my waterproof gloves (sadly, not Gore-Tex), I can simply put my RC on over top of my jeans and shirts and be ready for any weather. I keep my MP3 player in the front pocket and various things in other pockets and never have to worry about them or myself being wet. I live in the PNW and this is an important feature for me. I use this suit from -10 to 40+ degrees (Celsius) without having to add, remove or modify it in any way other than opening some vents and putting on some wool underneath. It has made my riding life infinitely more enjoyable.

    So, can a Motoport kevlar suit offer this same great livability? The website is a bit vague on this and Wayne's answer to my email was a bit vague as well. I don't want to pester him with calls and emails as I am really only a look-loo at the moment.

    Thanks :clap
  19. funinthesun

    funinthesun Been here awhile

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    Quick answer yes. But you will have to either pit the items under your liner ie on your street cloths or have him make you a waterproof pocket liner. I have tried both and am currently just placing items under the liner for ease.


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  20. levain

    levain STILL Jim Williams Supporter

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    No. The suit isn't waterproof. The liners or whatever rain suit you choose is, even if your choice of waterproofing is a plastic bag. It doesn't make the suit itself waterproof, like your laminated goretex roadcrafter. Don't confuse the difference. There are advantages and disadvantages to both systems. If I lived somewhere that I rode in the rain often, rain gear wouldn't be an option, but that's me.