Motoport Kevlar first impressions (long, many pics...)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Gringo, May 18, 2005.

  1. pHudson

    pHudson still riding

    Joined:
    May 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    137
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    Sydney
    Thanks for your insights. My current practice is to just carry a rain suit in a tail bag; I'll probably keep doing that. My real dilemma is the overpant v jean issue. Your comment about overpants has got me thinking.
  2. 1-3-2-4

    1-3-2-4 Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2011
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    I love the overpant. Since they are made from stretch, Wayne made mine to actually stretch a bit when worn. As a result, you can wear just your underwear or a pair of jeans in comfort. If I wear my leather riding pants these days, it's ONLY in the hottest months of the year, and it's ONLY when I'm going out for a joyride with no stops along the way. The overpants are entirely too useful to leave at home on most rides.
  3. jimrazz

    jimrazz Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Oddometer:
    85
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    Santa Cruz Mountains
    Hi-
    Been a while since I've posted, but I was going through my gear and I've decided to let my Motoport go. I bought it brand new from factory. I had it "custom made" with vertical zippered top "pistol" pockets, (instead of the ugly flaps). It also has snaps in front of zipper instead of annoying Velcro. There's sleeve pockets as well. It's black and is top of the line. I have the receipt somewhere. It was around $900-1000 if I remember correctly. Anyway, I never really wore it so it is in perfect condition (not ever dirty or washed) Kevlar mesh basically brand new from 2009 I think. I ride with leather on the street, and I wound up with a different brand endure Jacket that I like better than the motoport, MSR. (personal preference)
    If there's any interest I will post some pics or send to you directly.
    Oh ya, it's a size large. Black with reflective strips in back and down legs They run big. I'm 6'0" 190 and it fits perfect. I also have the goretex liners.
  4. pHudson

    pHudson still riding

    Joined:
    May 28, 2014
    Oddometer:
    137
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    Sydney
    I've got an order in for some Ultra II mesh pants to go with my navy Marathon stretch jacket. I still haven't settled on the color of the pants. Does anyone know if the navy pants in mesh would be an identical match to the navy of the jacket? I don't want to look like I'm trying and failing to match them if the appearance is different. Unless people can tell me that they will look the same, I'll probably go with gray pants. Any advice would be appreciated.
  5. Garnet Grylls

    Garnet Grylls Old Low and Slow

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    111
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    Got my stretch Kevlar Ultra 2 in the mail last Saturday. Fits great and has all the specs I ordered. I've worn it about 5 hours so far and the tri-armor is settling in nicely.

    It is in the high 20s C right now and that seems to be the upper limit for comfort around town, but it is quite comfy on the highway.

    So far I'm very happy and I called Wayne and told him so. I'll add more in the fall once it's cold and wet and I've tested the liners.
  6. funinthesun

    funinthesun Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2009
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    so cal
    Hay guys. Had two setups of reflective on my suit to do a comparo. Ill let u judge which is better ;)
    [​IMG][​IMG]
  7. Zherome

    Zherome n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1
    Location:
    Western OR
    First, I want to thank everyone who has contributed to this legendary thread. It put me over the edge to buy Motoport and helped answer lots of questions. I'm very happy with my purchase and have no thoughts of getting new jacket or pants. If you have any questions or aren't certain what you want, call and ask questions. Don't assume anything, and don't assume that Wayne will assume anything the way you do. He patiently answered all of my questions, but didn't really give a whole lot of advice. I'd say it's way better to talk to him than agonize over decisions if you aren't sure of something after reading this thread. When I called he moved things along, but never sounded like he was trying to get rid of me. He knows his product and can answer any question.

    Hopefully I'll toss in a few thoughts about some aspects that haven't been overly developed (if that's possible).

    I got the air mesh jacket (the short one) and Ultra II mesh pants, black, all the yellow hi-viz striping they offer, and the full set of quad armor. Everything fit exactly right (basic dimensions). No errors or anything unexpected. Out of the box the pads were stiff, but they gradually broke in. The shoulder pads never quite formed as much as I expected (going on 4 months now), but they are comfortable. They just seem to stick out a little here and there. The suit is bulky, but really not bad. I don't notice it while riding. The mesh is VERY nice in the heat. The aerotex liner is very effective blocking both wind and water. I haven't had any water leaks. The rain I've been in didn't get through the suit while gloves got waterlogged and soggy toes on one foot. No problems with water running into gloves. The suit takes longer than expected to thoroughly dry out.

    Some observations and adjustments:
    -It's pretty snug in the forearms. This can be a little annoying when layering. That was surprising as I have skinny forearms. You might toss in a measurement if they can adjust that.
    -The forearm pads are WAY longer and broader than any I've seen before (nice). I had to trim them back maybe an inch to get my long gauntlet gloves on over the cuffs. I would say the jacket really doesn't work that well for putting the gauntlet over the cuff. I think I'm going to go to shorter gloves when my current summer gloves wear out. My medium length winter gloves go inside the cuff pretty easily.
    -The quad armor is thick, but not overly heavy or distracting at all.
    -The pants are heavy enough that they pull down and the knee pads fall a bit low. I think someone said to set the bottom of the shin pads on top of your boots. This is very effective for me as I have medium height boots. Very happy with how this works. I still may trim some off the bottom of the pads.
    -I second the motion to make sure you have the velcro situated well with the aerotex liners. I had a couple of cold air leaks on one knee until I managed to master the velcro.
    -The pants liner almost seem oversized compared to the outer suit. That makes for easy layering, but I have to sort of cram the liner in to get the outer zippers closed.
    -It was a different routine of getting dressed, but with some experimenting it's reasonably fast on/off for commuting. I use the intended method of unzipping both the liner and outer to get into the pants. Once I got the hang of it, it works better than taking off boots and pulling on like regular pants.
    -I don't know how anybody can cram either piece into any luggage.
    -The sacrum pad felt a little weird at first (not bad, just different), but I don't notice it now.
    -I got double hip pads. The material wasn't what I expected - it was stiff foam, not the soft, squishy kind I've always seen. And larger that others. The front pads were a nuisance as far as bending at the hip and lifting my feet to the pegs. I think even a single layer would be similar. I managed to "free" them inside by painstakingly ripping the seams - grabbing the pad through the liner, and pulling a tiny bit at a time. They are very securely sewn, let me tell you. The seam ripper didn't work as the thread had sunk so far into the foam. The back hip pads are perfectly fine (even the double-layer). I don't even notice them. They are placed well to cover my hip bone. I'm not sure what the front ones even cover.
    -The zippers for the two liners (aerotex and thermal) zip bottom to top, but haven't bothered me at all. I heard some say the pull hits their collar bones, but that's not an issue for me.
    -It is restrictive as far as reaching straight up, but I don't do much of that while riding. :)
    -The mesh doesn't stretch. The stretch panels they put in are well designed and the whole thing moves perfectly well for riding, walking, etc.
    -The mesh is a little scratchy, but not quite as bad as I thought it might be based on some of the cheese grater descriptions. It has scuffed my tank a tiny bit, but hasn't appeared to damage the seat at all.
    -I liked the idea and look of the flap over the belt buckle, but removed it pretty quick. The jacket covers the buckle and messing with it was a nuisance (flopping around in the way of the zipper). It wasn't kevlar anyway, so really wouldn't keep the buckle from getting ground up in a slide.
    -I always felt naked if I didn't have on my old gear. Now I feel naked if I don't wear the Motoport. It gives a great sense of confidence and helps me concentrate on the ride. Even when I take a slow ride around the block sans gear after tuning something, I obsessively picture my knees and elbows grinding into the pavement. The gear makes me feel more secure than anything else I've had.
    -I don't get too many weird looks. :)

    That's all I can think of. Thanks for reading my book.

    Summing up - it took a few small adjustments, but I love the gear.
    stevenkelby likes this.
  8. harley1550

    harley1550 Touring Rider

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    226
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    +1 Zherome. Thanks for taking the time and effort to give us the details. I love Motoport gear. I've had it for almost 8 years and consider it the best buy I've made in motorcycling, and I started riding in 1969! :)
  9. boumboum

    boumboum n00b

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    Near Montreal, Qc, Canada
    Is this the link: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3368152&postcount=69 ???

  10. 1911fan

    1911fan Master of the Obvious Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    5,058
    Location:
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Quote from: Dragos
    Some observations:
    Originally Posted by Wayne at Motoport View Post
    1. Motoport USA is the only company in the world that could make custom synthetic gear to fit Ken’s size.
    False.

    If you go back and read my reply, Ken’s suit was a Kevlar blended suit and this was mentioned two times. Sorry to leave out the word Kevlar in the second statement. It is not clear to me that Stadler, the only company I know of making custom synthetic suits would be able to make one in Ken’s size or any rider that is very tall, short, thin or heavy.

    Quote:
    5. Motoport provides to any rider any size the most protective/versatile/long lasting motorcycle apparel in the world.
    This is a purely random statement which cannot be proven.

    This is not a purely random statement and it can be proven. In fact proof beyond any doubt. Proven with not only independent testing here in the USA and Europe but also proven with thousands of crashed suit along thousands of medical studies on the riders that crashed. Please read on.

    I have no experience with Motoport products, but browsing their site which is filled with bombastic, impossible-to-prove but enthusiastically written statements like the ones above doesn't give the impression of a trusty company.
    Please find even one statement that is bombastic. Please show me one statement that is impossible to prove. Please show me one case that shows we are not a trusty company.

    And his subjective opinion (a very broad and encompassing one) shouldn't be used for advertising. Not opinions, all facts. It's a claim that basically any gear manufacturer can make, and pretend it's in good faith.

    Not one other motorcycle company can make all the claims that Motoport USA makes without telling a lie.

    Getting back to their kevlar mesh gear, my subjective opinion after checking around is that the Klim Adventure Rally Air is more protective and better manufactured than Motoport equivalents. And way better looking.

    It can be proven with facts that Motoport’s Kevlar blended apparel is far more protective than the Klim. Please read on. Better looking is a matter of opinion.

    I haven't seen Motoport gear in person, just pictures on Advrider and their site. I have seen the Klim one in person.
    All thing being equal (Kevlar mesh), Klim adds SuperFabric on shoulders, elbows, knees, so it's more abrasion resistant.

    I provide the tear/abrasion strength of all the material Motoport USA uses. Please tell me what “Super Fabric” is? What is the abrasion rating? I also supply every part of the gear. Zippers, seam strength, thread/stitching, armor etc… The material we make our flaps out of is stronger/better than any other material used to make any other motorcycle apparel.

    Also comparing it with picts of Motoport gear, the stitching seems better quality, as is the overall manufacturing quality.

    No again, you are incorrect. Please read how Motoport stitches all our construction seams. Motoport USA has seam strength of 2000 plus pounds. Please tell me what seam strength Klim has? What thread does Klim use, how are the seams stitched?

    Personally, I'm absolutely convinced the Klim is a better and more protective product, but that's not the point.

    Your completely wrong again. Please read on.

    The point is that you can't, as a representative of a company, come and say "we make the best stuff in the world". It's not ethical and it's also very easy for anyone (eg me) to come and cast doubt on such a dumb, bombastic and generic statement.

    First I’m the owner that points out facts about Motoport USA products. I’ve explained in the past in different links, some here on ADVRIDER, proving my statements. Please prove just one of your incorrect statements above. It is always easy for anyone to cast doubts when they have very little background in the subject being covered. The only statements here that are dumb and bombastic are yours.

    Car94 Quote:
    Wayne-from everything I have read, it sounds like your company makes a fantastic product and since you are not beholden to shareholders you can refuse service to anyone you want. But to come on here and so vigorously defend your policy and actions against 1 disturbed customer.

    One disturbed customer slams Motoport USA products for a mistake made in washing and then continues to claim that our customer service is terrible, it’s time for me to reply. I’m very proud of what we manufacture here at Motoport. I’m also a long time racer and I still ride today. Motorcycles are my passion. I’m also very proud of my company customer service record. We go far beyond what any other company will do to please our customers along with providing by far the best motorcycle apparel in the world. As mentioned in the past Motoport USA will sell a ton of gear from this post. Please read on.

    CY Quote:
    one valid complaint about motoport mesh kevlar is how bulky the suit is. almost impossible to compress into anything small.

    reason why Motoport mesh kevlar so bulky is simple .. all the armour all over the suit, very full coverage. my BMW Atlantis 4 suit is the same way .. very bulky due to armour all over, also very good coverage.

    BMW is CE rated, Motoport is not .

    Motoport is EN-Certified and far exceeds the CE rating.
    having lived in both. both give excellent protection .. hard to say which one is better. both are excellent!

    there's really three methods of testing, each has advantages and drawbacks.

    1. first is what I call, static load tests where calibrated weights are dropped on certain zones. then a drum sander with a certain grit. suit is pressed against abrasive grit moving at speed. etc. etc.

    advantages are all tests are repeatable, allowing direct comparison against set standards. disadvantages are very expensive costs to perform test by private companies. some folks consider results of questionable value. correct me if I'm wrong .. Aerostich and Motoport both chose not to participate in CE armour tests. tests below took an Aerostich suit, performed load test similar CE armour tests. results was Aerostich did extremely well and was one of the top performers.

    example of static tests on motorcycle suits

    2. second is what I call dynamic load tests. basically a fully suited up test dummy same weight as a human rider is dropped off a motorcycle going say 70mph. advantages are real world forces are generated by test dummy hitting the road at speed. personally are in favor dynamic vs static load tests.

    disadvantages are tests are not completely repeatable due to variable nature of test dummies striking the road. making direct comparisons difficult at best.
    example of dynamic load tests on motorcycle suits .. in German, translations available

    Please go onto our web site and read the following links:
    http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...cles&Itemid=22
    http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...cles&Itemid=22
    http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...cles&Itemid=22

    Motoport has conducted more testing on motorcycle accidents/apparel that is more advanced than any other company or country in the world today. Our studies are far more advanced than the link above:

    example of static tests on motorcycle suits

    3. third type of load tests has to be studying results of real world crashes. disadvantages are the suit in question has to be in the field for a long time in large enough numbers to gather enough crashed examples. this is where long establish mfg like Aerostich and Motoport has a huge advantage by pure number of suits in the field, combined with 20+ years of production.

    another disadvantage has to be the inconsistency of crash results. a HUGE advantage is mfg like Motoport and Aerostich can take these real world crash results, then improve their suits based on this data.

    fact is all the very top tier suits which includes Klim, Motoport, Aerostich, BMW Atlantis/Rallye, etc ... all the top tier motorcycle suits deliver a high level of protection that's very close to each other.

    The fact is that Motoport provides far better protection than any other motorcycle apparel. I can prove this with facts. Here is a very simple list that is easy to follow.
    For MOTORCYCLE APPAREL TO BE PROTECTIVE IT MUST HAVE:
    1. Impact protection covering the most endangered areas of the body. (I’ve seen only a few types of armor that is close to Motoport’s for impact absorption. Motoport’s is still better along with more coverage.) Click on: http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...cles&Itemid=22
    2. Sufficient Tear Strength. Click on: http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...cles&Itemid=22
    3. Sufficient Abrasion Strength (See links above.)
    4. Sufficient Seam Strength. (Motoport has the best in the world.)

    Not one of the above other suits except Motoport USA has all four of the top listings for the gear to be protective. In fact not one of the other companies except Motoport USA above has even one of the listings covered. If you read the links I’ve posted prior to this email my points will be clear. Klim was the first company to use Mesh Kevlar with good tear/abrasion strength. The problem with Klim is that the gear has far too many seams with poor seam strength. This makes the tear/abrasion invalid. If the arm tears off, the armor/tear/abrasion strength doesn’t matter. Klim also uses far too many panels along with other materials in panels,that have poor tear/abrasion strength. Any of Motoport’s 1000 Denier Cordura Jackets have better protection than the Klim. The best price I can find on the Klim is $1,299.00. Our 1000 Denier Cordura Jackets start at $384.00 and made here in house in the USA, not in China like the Klim. But wait we also make a jacket in China that offers better protection than the Klim. This jacket is called the Challenger. The Challenger Jacket is to my knowledge the best selling synthetic jacket in the world today. In 1994 this jacket sold for $429.00. But wait, IT IS NOW ON SALE FOR $149.00. It is also far better than the Challenger Jackets sold in Europe. Better materials, no plastic coating, better armor, more coverage of armor etc… (If I market our products this way will more riders get the point?)
    http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...tail&Itemid=15

    Here are a few other simple facts to follow:
    1. Every other synthetic motorcycle apparel made today has a plastic, “Polyurethane” coating on the inside of the face fabric. Upon impact in a tumble friction can cause heat instantly. The skin absorbs this melting plastic and in many cases skin grafting is necessary to repair.
    2. Motoport’s Kevlar blended apparel is the only synthetic apparel approved for road racing. Can be worn in FIM, AMA, WERRA etc… Try wearing any of the other synthetic apparel road racing. Many synthetic jackets/pants are shown in the, “example of static tests on motorcycle suits” link above. The vast majority of the high rated gear is primarily made with 500 Denier Cordura that tears at less than 22 pounds and it is all plastic coated. (Motoport USA has Stretch Kevlar Suits that tear at 420 pounds, Mesh Kevlar Suits that tear at 1,260 pounds!) The link to click on for the Aero-Stitch suit crashed at so called 80 mph is not proof that this suit provides proper protection. Did the rider crash in the dirt? What are the details? Motoport world wide has sold more gear made with 500 Denier Cordura than any other company. The most protective Aero-Stitch is made with 500 Denier plastic coated Cordura. I’ve seen 500 Denier Cordura tear at a 10mph tumble.
    3. Stadler is the only other company I know of that makes custom synthetic gear. It is unclear that that they make gear for very tall/short/heavy riders. I would be amazed if Stadler made gear for the OP that was very thin and short. (This could be the cause of the attitude problem.) Riders are lucky if they fit properly in other gear if it is not custom made. If the gear doesn’t fit properly it cannot protect properly in a tumble. Stadler is still plastic coated with the majority of materials in a 500 Denier Cordura Strength that is totally inadequate for riding a motorcycle.


    Ken the OP Quote:
    I haven't said a single lie. You can change your instructions all you like, but if someone follows the directions YOU stitch into your garment, you cannot fault them. I cannot speak to what you said or didn't say to my wife, beyond that you charged her without a word to me, knowing what my response was. You accused me (and here again) of not following your directions, but I followed the directions you included in the garment itself. If those directions are wrong, you should put the right directions into the garment or something to the effect of "see washing instructions at {url}". You can play self righteous all you like, the fact remains that you were disrespectful to a customer - whether that customer was disgruntled or not makes no difference. As for being black listed, I'm not buying another suit from you so you don't even have to worry about exercising that anyway, but you WILL make any repairs required in the future if they are needed, per the purchase contract, so you're not getting out of future work on this suit if it's needed unless you refund it. As for getting more business or not, that's up to the consumers - as I said before, I don't care if others purchase your product but they deserve to know that you are disrespectful to your customers once you have their money. If that gets you more sales, good for you. If it doesn't or it costs you sales, oh well, you were the one who responded to a legitimate gripe with accusations and rudeness. That's on you. Am I perfect? No, and I never claimed to be. But your product failed when I washed it per the instructions in the garment. Is that your fault? No, and I never said it was, but it certainly isn't my fault either and your response was trying every which way to claim that it was. Good day

    Stupid: Lacking intelligence or reason. Lacking interest or point. Lack of power to absorb ideas/impressions.

    I would consider the OP, Ken an intelligent person. He purchased the best motorcycle apparel in the world. I would also consider Ken, to be a very stupid person when it comes to how he replies above. Would anyone reading his links want a customer like Ken. Would anyone reading this link want to make repairs on Ken’s suit.


    I don’t expect riders like dragos to understand all the details that go into making motorcycle apparel. I also don’t expect comments about motorcycle apparel, from dragos, to hold any validity. Dragos knows very little about motorcycle apparel. I started in the motorcycle industry in 1969. I raced motorcycles all over the world for a few decades. Motoport USA gets on average 5 suits per week that have been crashed. I’ve seen thousands of crashed motorcycle suits and have spoke to thousands of motorcycle riders that have crashed. I take rolls of material, cut sew, completely assemble motorcycle apparel and have been doing this now for close to 27 years. The main problem is that the majority of motorcycle apparel made today is not even close to adequate protection. The majority of gear made for riders in the USA is made In China with plastic coated polyester and is complete crap. Even the higher priced synthetic gear made today is not close to adequate protection. Again 500 Denier Cordura tears at less than 22 pounds. If this higher priced synthetic apparel is crashed at speeds of over 25mph the rider will be very lucky if he is not injured from the gear failing. Just last week 3 riders wearing our pant crashed at speeds of around 25mph to 30mph. Our pant was not even damaged. The Rukka, Klim and BMW jackets they were wearing, completely fell apart.
    Please again read the following links to learn more about Motoport and how we make our gear:
    http://www.motoport.com/index.php?op...id=1&Itemid=22

    This is another great link to read from our customers and others. It is a long link but should answer many questions about Motoport USA. A very similar event to a similar issue here, came up around 3 years ago. I included my full background on this post. The first rider on this link to show this post will get a free pair of Kevlar Racing Gloves from Motoport USA:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...light=Motoport

    After reading the links above, if you still have any questions, I’m here to help.

    Best regards,
    Wayne Boyer
    CEO Motoport USA
  11. econwatch

    econwatch Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    May 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    524
    Location:
    SLC,YVR/YYC,LGA
    Forgive the shit-eating grin. This pic from Sept 2014 was prior to tying together the two ends of the Bayley-Hazen that I didn't get to do on our annual Chasing Marc's Zumo 2013 trip. (had to ~upgrade from T800XC to KTM990...)

    [​IMG]

    And this is what happens when you let your blood sugar drop too far. Plant the front wheel into a mud pocket stopping the bike, flip over the handlebars and split the Wunderlich with your chest. Just another day with Motoport. Wearing this kit dangerously spawns the desire for the phrase "hold my beer and watch this..."

    [​IMG]

    Mesh jacket, stretch overpants.
  12. harley1550

    harley1550 Touring Rider

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Oddometer:
    226
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Very cool and glad you're still smiling. :) Motoport is great gear, as proven over and over again. My wife and I just got back to the Houston area after a great Calif. trip, during which we stopped in and visited Motoport. I added the tailbone armor to my 8 year old mesh pants while there and had a zipper pull replaced on my mesh jacket, the only issue after 8 years of year round riding and one significant wreck.

    While there another customer came in and he asked if I'd ever known anyone who had wrecked in the gear. I gave my account and that of Crashmaster, a great tribute to the protective qualities and reliability of the gear, and he then told me that he was a San Diego policeman and proceeded to tell me how super protective the gear is, with various wreck accounts. I love Motoport gear. I do wonder though why Wayne wastes time responding to blather like that above from an obvious negative instigator who has never seen the gear in person! Oh well, I highly recommend Motoport gear. Great gear.
    Trailrider200 likes this.
  13. zoid

    zoid Dirty Old Hippie

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
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    2,003
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    Mo better now
    This thread and a couple other threads here on ADV and elsewhere have convinced me. I'll be buying a Motoport Kevlar mesh jacket for the coming riding season. My only decision is will it be the Marathon or the Ultra II. They appear to be fundamentally the same jackets, just design differences. It looks like a phone call is in order. Thanks to everybody for all of the info that has been given here.
  14. SafetyDon

    SafetyDon Riding the western US

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
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    23
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    Bend Oregon
    After riding 12,000 miles in our Motorport Ultra Mesh jackets and pants this past summer we had an idea of some minor fit adjustments. While on a winter vacation we shipped the gear to Motorport and then went by for a meeting with Wayne. He gave us an extensive tour of the factory, and I will say he is one of the nicest guys you will meet. I was obviously already sold on the quality of the gear, but after getting a close up look and the sewing process, I was amazed. Looking at suits that have been returned for repairs after crashing and you compare the ones from other manufacturers, you will never think there is a safer product than Motoport, period. I tried the test of holding a hard armor product and punching the corner of a wall, it hurt. Then you take a piece of the quad armor and punching the corner.....OK punch it harder....it's technology of material and construction, again simply amazing. Naysayers can make any claims, but I've seen it first hand. We've ridden from 30 - 107 degrees, in rain and blazing sun, I will not get on the bike without it.

    Attached Files:

    Trailrider200 likes this.
  15. SafetyDon

    SafetyDon Riding the western US

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
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    23
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    Bend Oregon
    Just a photo of the suits.

    Attached Files:

  16. harley1550

    harley1550 Touring Rider

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
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    226
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    +1 SafetyDon. I couldn't agree more. Wayne's a great guy and Motoport is great gear.
  17. regnaDkciN

    regnaDkciN crown bearing @ 60k, clutch @ 69k,HyperPros @ 70k Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
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    Kennesaw, GA
    Just ordered HK. Ride 70 miles per day in Hot Lanta. Are Wayne's other styles better for hot, interstate/traffic stalled commutes?.
  18. Sitheach86

    Sitheach86 Long timer

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    Jan 21, 2016
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    3,281
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    I ride everyday in south Texas and it gets hot. As well as being in the 7th largest city in the US.

    I ordered the air mesh shirt. I also have only one pocket. Reasoning is the less material air has to pass through the better. Also it's simplistic and functions great.

    IMG_3017.JPG
    regnaDkciN likes this.
  19. regnaDkciN

    regnaDkciN crown bearing @ 60k, clutch @ 69k,HyperPros @ 70k Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
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    Location:
    Kennesaw, GA
    I have a couple of Klim jerseys. Hoping the HK isn't too short. Only pocket I need is the ID sleeve pocket. Put the order in today (Sun.) I have no problem if they talk me out of it, but it looks hi-viz enough. I commute with as much conspicuity and good road manners as I can (they see me every day, have enough enemies).
  20. regnaDkciN

    regnaDkciN crown bearing @ 60k, clutch @ 69k,HyperPros @ 70k Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2014
    Oddometer:
    170
    Location:
    Kennesaw, GA
    Like the shirt, though.