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Motorcycle Mechanics Institute?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by flux_capacitor, Jul 9, 2007.

  1. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    Anyone ever attend MMI? What is the general consensus on this? Is it a legitimate way to get into the m/c industry? I am torn on my thoughts at this particular moment in time. Any guidance would be appreciated. Many thanks. :thumb
    #1
  2. fixer

    fixer KLR-riding cheap bastard

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    go to your local dealership(s) and ask the service manager what he thinks of MMI and if he hires graduates from that school over any other training/experience.
    #2
  3. Gizmo

    Gizmo Hermes

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    Good advice, you might also make the same inquiry with several in your area.
    #3
  4. dlearl476

    dlearl476 Two-bit Throttle Bum Supporter

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    My son went to the one in Phoenix. They placed him at a dealership almost immmediately and he worked there the entire time he was in school. He has been working continuously since, except for two weeks when one dealership that he should have quit in the fall laid him off due to lack of business in the winter (after they had promised him they wouldn't as a condition of his taking the job). He's worked at MC/Watercraft/Snowmobile dealers since and never been out of work.

    I think in his opinion, and mine, it was a great deal. I can't promise every graduate has the same kind of luck/opportunities come along. He's a good employee, personable, dedicated and hard working with a high BS tolerance, which comes in handy in customer service oriented gigs.
    #4
  5. WABuckeye

    WABuckeye Been here awhile

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    This is a good thread i have always wondered about MMI myself. I hope to hear a lot about this from more people.

    Also i thought i heard somewhere that WYO Tech bought them out?
    #5
  6. Dano 407

    Dano 407 One Man Wolfpack

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    I have the local MMI/UTI rep visit my Jr/Sr class once a year. He does a good job and I believe they give the students a good education.

    For $18,000. No refunds.

    If you have a community college near you that offers motorcycle repair (rare) or outdoor power equipment, you may find yourself with the same local motorcycle shop job for about $16,000 less. And this is based on discussions with local employers around here.

    I believe the choices in automotive and diesel or heavy equipment are much more prevalent in community colleges. CC's and MMI both offer degree programs, but it will cost you considerably more at MMI. They do get you out the door in 18 months, though, if you just get the certificate and actually show up to class. All the "extra" courses, such as BMW, HD, YamaPro, etc all end up costing on top of the basic courses.

    An example is the Caterpillar program at a college an hour north of here. Dealership sponsored, degree and certificate in two years for about $2,000 with some tools tossed in on your graduation day. Two more of my guys are going there in the fall.

    About half the students I send down to UTI/MMI finish. As an aside, they are all pissed to find out that Arizona has a lower minimum wage than California.

    Get a good feel for your options before you sign on the dotted line.:deal
    #6
  7. aardschok

    aardschok Fallout Rider

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    The UTI/MMI schools may be good. But I wanted a degree instead of just a certificate. I was able to get my Associate Degree in Motorsports Vehicle Technology at Lanier Technical College in Oakwood, GA. Many of the students there did internships with Kevin Schwantz motorcycle school at Road Atlanta. You may want to check out the MVT program here:

    http://www.laniertech.edu/departments/department.asp?DeptID=27&navid=a1_3_28_39


    I was 38 years old at the time and I left my factory job of 10 years to get into racing. The only thing I regret, is that I waited so long to do it.

    Since you're here in GA Flux, you might want to check them out.
    #7
  8. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    When I worked in the industry we would often get resumes from AMI and MMI graduates. I am not sure we ever hired one, the reason being is that those schools do not teach the real world. Most shops do not have every factory tool, and a good mechanic can work around not having most of them. Also the mechanics are taught the proper technique to do everything, this is also not real world. A torque wrench is a great tool, but you do not have to torque the bolts on a clutch cover.
    That said of the best mechanics I ever knew was from Guyana and learned to make do growing up since his father owned a motorcycle shop that had limited parts and tools. When they moved to the U.S. he went to AMI and learned all the proper techniques and he blended the two of them and was awesome.
    I know it is the slow way to go, but if you have some decent mechanical skills I would get a job in a dealership as a prep guy or something for a short time (one season) then go to MMI, so you see the difference between theory and reality.
    That college program also looks interesting.
    #8
  9. Gizmo

    Gizmo Hermes

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    What you say is true in terms of real world vs theoretical. However a person interested in entering the field has to start somewhere and I would think that a person armed with a certificate or degree from a MMI or community college would be better off, than someone with no experience and no mechanical knowledge. Most, I am sure will quickly grasp the difference once they can apply their skills.
    #9
  10. RichBeBe

    RichBeBe All Hail Seitan!!! Supporter

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    I agree to a point, the problem is that some learn to adapt and others are primadonnas who need it to be perfect. They also usually wanted higher salaries than their experience warranted. The thing is though it is very different in all parts of the U.S. and I think that there is a smaller pool of mechanics in most areas than we have in the NYC metro area, so a trained mechanic with little or no experience may be more in demand in some areas than here.
    #10
  11. flux_capacitor

    flux_capacitor I know a shortcut!

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    That is GREAT information right there. Thanks a million, and I will look into it.

    As for real world vs a degree or certificate...it's like anything...it is hard to get your foot in the door. I have no experience, just a passion for bikes and that is all. Who is going to hire some dude that just loves bikes? Sure, it might happen, but I might as well be armed with SOMETHING. But I do see the point...you have to be willing and able to adapt to your environment. I ride dual sports. I am good at that. :evil :lol3
    #11
  12. canuck479

    canuck479 Adventurer

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    I am proud to say I graduated MMI in Orlando over six years ago and while I will agree with some of the comments made heare already that Knoledge is no substitute for experience everyone needs to start some where. Prior to MMI I was mechanically inclined but did not know "mechanics" very well. MMI ar any other good program does give you solid basic knowlege upon which to build. I personnally studdied there full Harley program but was able to get a job at my local BMW dealership where I have been ever since graduating. I can also say that with out my MMI experience I do not think I would have had the opportunity to get the position that I have now.:clap
    #12
  13. Caribou Aqua Buddha

    Caribou Aqua Buddha Long timer

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    I agree, and would add that one downfall of the school is that most of what you are working on in the real world can be 5-10 model years old.
    The best of both worlds would be a MMI graduate that has some additional factory training, and maybe some machining skills.
    I have seen MMI people enrolled in some factory training that I have attended. Also I think the schools are much better now than in the 70's when I was first aware of them. Back then we would have not likely hired from them, now there are at least three MMI grads in town that I know of.
    #13
  14. KellyC

    KellyC TimeKeeper

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    MMI is a good path to take if you are interested in working for a manufacturer. American Honda typically hires MMI grads to work in their fleet/press/HRA department. I also know several service reps for Honda who went to MMI. Honda typically likes to see people come out of dealerships, especially for the service rep jobs but several of them have MMI in their background.

    My advice is if you are ever interested in doing anything more than work for a MC dealer, you need to move to SoCal after completing MMI. I can go outside, throw a rock, and hit somebody who works in the "industry."
    #14
  15. furiousfart

    furiousfart Been here awhile

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    Schools like MMI and WyoTech are like any college you get out of it what you put into it. As a recent graduate of WyoTech, with no job btw, I can tell you that they don't have all the tool either, the bikes aren't all new and a good majority of the students shouldn't be there. The instructors for the most part are very good, and will do what ever they can to help you, if you are willing to work. I came from working in the electrical trade so I was kinda a step ahead, but still learned quite a bit. I now am BMW certified, have the full Ducati cert, and had taken the Yam/honda class. I lucked out with the Y/H class as they are changing over to the new class curiculem and was in a class of 1, and also took the Dyno class bymyself. If you are mechanicly inclined it is a good experiance.

    As for me not having a job and being out of school for the past month, it is my own fault. I forgot that in MA it is a renewal year for my Electrical License so I have so classes I've been trying to scramble and take. But did/do have several shops interested.
    #15