Motorcycle Misconceptions

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by CCitis, Aug 26, 2019.

  1. Rider2

    Rider2 Been here awhile Supporter

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    "Big oil" = "big rubber". Yeah, it passes through various processes (marked up along the way) between the time it leaves the ground and when it arrives at the tire manufacturer but without oil there would be no tires. Or rather, we'd have the shitty natural rubber tires of the 1920's.
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  2. SouthernJourneyman

    SouthernJourneyman Adventurer

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    Reminds me of my plant manager. Once he found out I rode he was all like, "I have a little scooter I put on the back of my RV to ride around the campground." Now that's fine and all, I have no problem with that. But now he wants to act like we're supposed to be buddies or something.
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  3. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    The people who choose to ride ATGATT are usually those who care/think more about safety to begin with. So, although being ATGATT does not cause you to be a safer rider (or the other way around, necessarily), there is a strong correlation.
  4. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    And that correlation speaks to the attitude about riding that the rider maintains. Attitude, self-responsibility and situational awareness, the "mental" side of riding in traffic can do far more than the mechanical skills of operating and controlling a motorcycle. To me, attitude, is THE leading principle of riding survival. It guides all the other choices. A rider who rides Proactively uses that attitude and self-responsibility to plan all riding actions. A proactive rider reads traffic, reads terrain, avoids riding into traffic troubles. A rider who rides Reactively has an attitude of "others must share the road with me, others have to watch for motorcycles", assumes other traffic users will do the right things. The Reactive rider HAS to rely more on defensive riding skills and riding skills in general to react to what they ride into.

    I have long felt it is not enough to ride defensively, because that relates to reacting to issues as they happen. A rider must be proactive before being defensive, to avoid riding into traffic trouble that requires reactive defensive riding.
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  5. CaseyJones

    CaseyJones Ridin' that train

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    Here's a challenge: Make an iPhone vid of approaching other riders from the other direction.

    You will hear those open pipes, maybe HALF A SECOND before he's on top of you. That's not safety. That's faster than even reaction time.

    The bike goes by and THEN you get the wash of that deafening drone.

    ATGATT doesn't prevent accidents. It prevents fatalities and minimizes injuries. Different approaches to the same end, which is, to live to ride another day.

    Open pipes just make you old and deaf, instead of just old. And give vigor to anti-rider initiatives.
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  6. AwDang

    AwDang Long timer

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    Sooo true
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  7. old scoot

    old scoot Been here awhile

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    I really do get a kick out of Harley bashers, look Casey your reply is one situation only, not the entire spectrum of what might happen in dozens of situations. I don't care anyway, it's supposed to be about misconceptions and when it comes to Harleys there are a lot. I'm glad you have figured out that you hate Harley but I really don't care. I don't care what someone else rides and I would ride with just about anybody unless I thought they were unsafe. There is not a motorcycle I'd rather have than my souped up Road Glide. If there was I'd have one. I can tell you this, it isn't about the bike, it's about the ride and I've been riding for 54 years.
  8. nbsdave

    nbsdave Been here awhile Supporter

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    yeah, don't you just hate it when somebody tries to be nice, especially the boss?
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  9. cwadej

    cwadej Keeper of the truth

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    that's quite the lucrative lawsuit your friend had. I hope he got paid very well.
    and doc would be fired at any reasonable (risk averse) hospital
  10. SouthernJourneyman

    SouthernJourneyman Adventurer

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    It wouldn't be so bad if he weren't the type to act all buddy buddy and then throw you under the bus first time he screws something up. The guy has stuff on camera showing he messed up and still tries to find ways to blame someone else. Gets really tiring after a while.
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  11. MauiCowie

    MauiCowie Long timer

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    ATGATT does not prevent fatalities. It reduces the risk of a fatality, that is all.
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  12. Andyvh1959

    Andyvh1959 Cheesehead Klompen Supporter

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    Any rider that relies on any one aspect of their relationship in traffic as :
    1. Loud pipes are safer
    2. High VIS riding gear reduces my risk
    3. White helmets is the best color choice
    4. Extra lights that gives you a unique "signature" against the road terrain

    is missing the entire picture of riding in traffic and situational awareness. NONE of these four items reduces the rider's need and ability for very high situational awareness (SA). SA,...is the highest survivability skillset that I feel is not emphasized adequately in motorcycle magazines, ride safe books, rider training, etc. Training SA, learning SA, aggressively applying SA, constantly using SA to develop rider intuition, give a rider the inputs that guide the brain to plan and act for traffic and road conditions. SA includes subtleties of lighting, shadows, learning traffic patterns, recognizing traffic hazards, visibility issues and limitations of the rider and other road users, "terrain" from everything of slopes/road crown/signs/trees/etc,...anything that impacts how a rider relates to the road/traffic/other users all combine to fill the SA database that a rider HAS to know and use to survive. I am certain any rider of decades and high miles on the road in traffic has developed a highly tuned SA ability.

    Its like a top level NFL quarterback; the ball is snapped and in a second the QB sees the defense react, sees the options develop, see the pass rush and moves or delays, and adjusts almost instantly to what he "reads" and seemingly produces miraculous results. Yet, to that QB, it comes naturally, moves and develops in a way that time seems to slow down and gives him the input/data to make the right choices. Brady probably has one of the best SA capability levels in the league. Rogers is similar.
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  13. vortexau

    vortexau Outside the Pod-bay

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    In January 2019, I took delivery of the 'second' Moto Guzzi that I have owned; my 'first' Guzzi was an 850T back in 1974; a Big-Block Tourer derived from the famous V7 Sport with its Tonti-designed frame. So, all up, I've now owned a total of sixteen powered two-wheelers with engine sizes ranging from 65cc up to 1000cc. During my 52 years in the saddle, I'd also had two across-the-frame crankshaft V-twins; BOTH of these being shaft-driven Hondas. In fact - apart from a brief interleude with a Honda 500/4 just before the 850T, all of these machines had been singles, or twins of Boxer or V configuration.

    So anyway (at bike number 16) I pick-up the Moto Guzzi V9 Bobber , ride it to a Queensland Transport office where I arrange registration and a plate, and after returning a loaned 'temp' plate to the preparing dealer- begin the one hour ride homeward and westward.

    I stop off at a Servo (filling station) to top-up the tank only 18 minutes from my destination (THIS Guzzi's tank capacity is down 10 or 11 litres compared to the 850T's, although the engine size is similar . . . but the engine is a Small Block this time around).

    There, as I'm holding the bowser nozzle in the tank's filler opening, a non-motorcyclist approaches and initiates conversation. He asks what the BRAND is, and I point to the Eagle tank emblem, followed by the polished engraved "MOTO GUZZI" branding at the apex of the matt-black rocker cover, explaining that this is a Moto Guzzi . . . . . . an Italian motorcycle marque that's been building motorcycles since the early 1920s.

    I'd even made mention of the Clint Eastward - Dirty Harry - Magnum Force - Moto Guzzi Police Motorcycle film appearance/s and such . . . . . .
    Then, he hits me with a final parting query, as if I had't been feeding him reliable data all this time - - - "Is it a Harley?" he asks.

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  14. ddavidv

    ddavidv Ignores Goats and Roadrunners

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    "I had to lay 'er down"

    No, you chose to "lay 'er down".
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  15. Rider2

    Rider2 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Perhaps he doesn't realize "Harley" is actually a brand name? Like there's "dirt bikes" and "crotch rockets" and "harleys" and he needed to know how to pigeonhole it?

    Kleenex and Band-Aid have had this problem for decades. Aspirin, too, until Bayer forgot to renew the trademark.
  16. vortexau

    vortexau Outside the Pod-bay

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    I have never been witness to the term "crotch rocket" in Oz.

    I'd deem the average Australian motorist to be a little bit more advanced in even basic motorcycle knowledge, than the average American motorist. Its in the lack of appreciation of just how many motorcycle marques are in existance, that an ordinary non-rider would be likely to be found wanting.

    Even among riders, how many would be ignorant of the Japanese motorcycle brand-name Bridgestone (ending somewhere in the mid-70s), and the Italian brand Moto Morini?

    Further, any moron should pick the name "Harley" as being of American origin. I had given adequate notice that my bike was an Italian product.

    But I am confident that folk don't just lump a Ferrari, or a Maserati, or a Porsche in as just being another version of Toyota Corolla, or Volkswagen Golf?!
    Or, do you think that they might go to a motor show, and want to see a Ford Bentley Continental GT, a Toyota McLaren F1, or a Hyundai Lamborghini Urus?
  17. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    @vortexau,

    I can't tell you how many people have looked at my Fiat and proclaimed they've had an MG just like it. Or lecture me on how my Beetle was a Porsche, or the other way around. Or think my old Honda Magna was a Harley.

    Never underestimate people's ability to confuse things and make mistakes. Laugh and go on, doesn't do you any good to upset yourself over it.

    Btw, google "Harley Aermacchi". Harley was an Italian bike once, sorta.
  18. CCitis

    CCitis Been here awhile

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    It is a good looking Harley though....:hide
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  19. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades...

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    So, from this I surmise that 1/2 of the Asian bikes you've ridden have soul... Including the Triumph if assembled in Thailand... Doesn't that make it harder to tell if a bike is an Asian motorcycle? :lol3
  20. vortexau

    vortexau Outside the Pod-bay

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    Did you not understand that I am an Australian, and that some idioms do not match country to country? For instance here people use the term "Vacuum" to describe the process of using a vacuum cleaner, rather than the American counterpart "Hoover". Neither do Australians use the term "Jacuzzi" but they, instead, use the term "Hot Tubbing" or "get in the Hot Tub".

    The Mad Max movies, excepting for the last enstallment, were Australian made. "Bikie" is Aussie slang for a member of a motorcycle club. The Honda CT90 / CT125 is well known in my country as the "postie Bike".

    In 1973 -74 I owned a Fiat 850 Sport (the model with a 903cc motor) and I never encountered anyone who mistaked it for a MG.

    A bit later I owned a 1300cc VW 'Beetle' Custom model (lacked a fuel gauge, and had a Reserve Position . . . like a motorcycle of the era). No Australian ever "lectured me on how it was a Porsche".

    After that, I had a Morris Nomad 1500 OD5. That was never mistaken as being other than a BMC / Morris / or British Leyland product.

    My second four-wheeler, a BMC Moke with the 1,100cc motor and 13" wheels back earlier in 1969, was quite often mistakenly referred to a being a Mini Moke. But the upgraded model really just used the Moke name - 1,100cc is not so mini as 850cc, and 13" wheels are not so mini as 10" ones.

    About 2007-8 period, I had a Honda Shadow VT750C (the shaft-driven model) finished in black, and set-up with leather-type saddlebags and a large screen. I never encountered anyone who voiced the idea that it could be a Harley.

    I'm thinking that maybe ignorant Australians are not as big a percentage of the population as in some other countries.

    No - the fellow whom I encountered at that service station DID NOT really upset me.
    I found his final question funny.

    I'm thinking that its posters on this forum (who are vainly trying to explain behaviour in a country somewhat different to the one in which they reside) who are more likely to do that!

    And for your further information, my third motorcycle about 1969 (following after a Honda C65 and a CZ125) was actually a Harley Davidson M65S - the initial model which had no battery, no fork lock, nor any highbeam headlight element - and had not yet been named the "Leggero". Yes - I did understand that ALL the lower capacity H-D models were Italian products and made by Aermacchi - even the 350cc Sprint model. That acquition was back in the AMF era when a company known for making 10-Pin Bowling equipment had a large ownership share in the company. (photo is of later model. Mine had no black stripe nor battery - being magneto only.)

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