motorcycle salesmen—is it just ME??

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by sshbsn, Aug 1, 2019.

  1. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    ::barf:: no thanks. I sure hope this useless profession disappears soon.
  2. swetard

    swetard Adventurer

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    Imma go on a positive note here.
    I'm looking at picking up a 701 enduro, headed to gothenburg to test ride and i was pleasantly surprised at how smooth an unpushy they were.
    I came in, mentioned that i wanted to testride it and was pointed to a different desk. He basically asked "You got your gear and want to ride it now?", gave me a document to sign and photocopied my licence. Handed over the key and walked with me to the bike outside. When i asked to ensure i had understood the available time right he just said that it doesn't really matter if i take it out a bit longer.

    After the test ride i came back in, he just asked how i liked it and even when i said i loved it he didn't try to push a sale. He handed me an quotation on bike with a bit of an accessories deal (15% off gear and parts basically) and answered my questions as much as possible. It ended with me saying i just have to decide between buyin now and buying a 2020 in spring without him even asking. Definitively going to spend my money with them.

    It seems that vehicle sales people here in sweden are less pushy overall. Maybe it is because 90% of swedes are introverts, and the sales people are just slightly less introverted. :hmmmmm
    Vistavette, liberpolly, 3sum and 2 others like this.
  3. old scoot

    old scoot Been here awhile

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    liberpolly, sometimes you seem like you know what you're talking about and then you say some stupid shit like that. I really don't know what to think about you .
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  4. rickr84

    rickr84 Been here awhile

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    I didn't read the whole thread but I saw a few things that might be interesting to have clarified.

    I started selling cars in 2008. Baad time to start. My first month I was #1 in store. By month 6 months in I was tracking top 10 for the manufacturer in all the US. I got as high as #5 out of 2200 salespeople sometime in 2013.

    One thing to consider regarding the idea that 'sales are down thus it must suck': as sales go down, number of salespeople on the floor goes down, so that remaining people still do ok. I worked at a small town dealership and sold 28 cars a month, because there were only 5 of us. I then moved to a major metro area that had 10x the population, way more high earners, and a flashy culture. I only sold a few more cars a month on average (34). Way more potential, yet I only did a little better. Why? Because the new place had 22 salespeople. If the economy craters, that place would thin out, and a salesperson with a high drive to work would do fine. This probably still applies to motorcycle dealerships. Salesfloors that used to have 7 salespeople, now have 3 and they do ok.

    Regarding the direct model and not even having salespeople... I dont think this will ever happen. I'm not even in the industry anymore so I dont really care. But I know that if you setup a form for people to insert their bank info and it spits out a car, you will sell X amount of cars a year. If you stick a person standing next to the form that says "Hey, stick your checkbook here and you can drive home in a nicer safer car!" you will sell more. If you then tell that person to let you sit in the car before he asks for the checkbook, youll sell even more! And if he asks you to drive it, you will sell EVEN more!

    I sold a lot of customers over the internet, all they had to do was come in and do the paperwork and drive off. Some would do exactly that. But most people WANT to talk to you about the car, sit in it, drive it, and converse with you about it. I dont think thats going away anytime soon.

    Edit: one final note. A lot of people think that they are deciding between a Ford and a Dodge. And that salespeople are there to get you to pick a Ford. They are a little, but that part is easy. In reality, people have the choice between buying a Ford, a Dodge, and simply not doing anything. Salespeople drive sales forward that might simply get delayed or not happen. And unless you are selling garbage that is unsafe, I think overall making the world go round quicker is a decent pursuit.
    texas_aggie, Vistavette and davidji like this.
  5. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    Tell you a secret - when you think I am saying "some stupid shit", it's because you didn't think about it, and are acting reflexively. I may be right or wrong, but I always have reasoning behind my claims.
  6. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    Exactly my experience here in Seattle in Triumph dealership. Maybe it's because there are so many Norwegians here in the North end :D

    Or more likely it depends on the brand.
    swetard likes this.
  7. ddavidv

    ddavidv Ignores Goats and Roadrunners

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    I'd wager he probably doesn't much care what you think about him.
  8. ChaoSS402

    ChaoSS402 Been here awhile

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    That right there is what a lot of people don't like about sales people. It's not that it makes you bad people, you are doing what is best for your company and yourself, and as long as you aren't being deceitful or trying to intimidate people into sales there's nothing wrong with that.

    But people don't like feeling like they got pushed into making a big purchase. Someone who test drives a car, with the intention of maybe testing some others, and then making a decision at a later point but who is then pushed into making the purchase then and there is probably less likely to feel good about the purchase a month later, and that tends to result in hard feelings toward the sales guy.
  9. grelcar

    grelcar Been here awhile

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    Professional sales person. Amateur buyer. Who usually wins?
  10. rickr84

    rickr84 Been here awhile

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    What you're talking about happens sometimes but isn't really what I was talking about. I was talking more about them pushing a willing person past their own hesitation they dislike about themselves, or even simply reminding them to move forward with something they have put on the back burner.

    For example, my house needs repainting badly. I just keep putting it off, and it's getting to the point it's probably doing damage to the wood that I'll have to repair too because I'm waiting that long. I'm doing it because I'm part lazy and part afraid just to start the process. I would almost appreciate if a contractor left me a flyer and note with rough estimate. And I wouldn't be mad if he knocked on my door once every 3 months to ask if I wanted to move forward.

    I wouldn't feel like he pressured me. I'd feel like he helped me do something I wanted to do but stalled for one reason or another.

    That's what I meant by not choosing one company vs another, but instead deciding between doing it and continuing with that status quo.
  11. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    Stopped by the local Triumph dealer this afternoon as I'm kicking around getting a Street Triple.

    The salesman I got roped into talking to was a world class asshat. Tried to sneak past him on the way out, but failed.

    AH: Blah, blah, blah
    Me: Just wanted to sit on a Street Triple. Not looking to buy anything until this winter.
    AH: Let me tell you what you NEED.
    Me: I'm pretty sure I know both what I want and what I need, but thanks.
    AH: No, you NEED that (whatever the top of the line Street Triple is) for track days.
    Me: The chances that I'll ever need a bike for track days are (about the same as me working with you on a purchase <- didn't say this) right at zero.
    AH: You never know. You'll need the upgraded suspension and brakes for track days.
    Me: Listening was never your strong point, was it?
    AH: Why don't you take all three models for a test ride?
    Me: Would love to, but I don't have time today.
    AH: Let me go get one ready for you.
    Me: Thanks. Gotta run.

    And this is why I like to get everything done via phone and/or email before walking in to do a purchase.
  12. rickr84

    rickr84 Been here awhile

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    For every person that dislikes one style of salesman ship, there are others that like it. That same style you experienced will leave another person saying "I came in, the salesman told me about the good value the sport model was compared to buying low-end and then paying for suspension revalving and tuning. And then, he offered to let me ride all 3!! The last dealership looked at me funny when I asked to sit on a bike! I love this dealership!"

    Now, the art of great salesmanship is to be quickly able to tell who you're dealing with, their preferred style, as quick as possible and without alienating them in the process. Not an easy task. If you can do it you can easily make $100k+ in sales, even car sales. But not everyone can. Baring that, your best bet is to be genuine and enthusiastic and just work with the people that like your style. There are enough of them no matter what it is.
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  13. wb57

    wb57 Long timer

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    I wouldn't disagree with any of that.
  14. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    The one who holds all the aces, i.e. wallet.
  15. rickr84

    rickr84 Been here awhile

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    I sold cars for years and once sent a price quote on a $60k silver car, that we were discounting to $56k. Except, I accidentally sent it as $46k.

    The potential customer replied back "I was hoping for white not silver. Can you do any better?"

    Literally $10k less than an already great deal (probably $9k lower than anyone in the country would sell one for) and the response was as generic as any other random price quote. From then on I really did believe it wasn't about the exact price or discount and to use the sales emails to get engagement, not commitment due to price alone. Sales 101 really but sometimes you have to learn the lessons yourself.
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  16. liberpolly

    liberpolly Nu, shoyn, nudnick!

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    You got all this generic wisdom from one encounter with a random idiot?
  17. rickr84

    rickr84 Been here awhile

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    No, I got this info from every bit of sales advice ever written. I finally believed it fully and acted on it, based on this extreme example of price so good its literally couldnt even be honored, yet it still wasn't good enough for a real potential buyer. If I had offered $15k off to a random person on the street, I understand why they wouldn't jump on it. This was already someone I had talked to and seemed like a real buyer to me.
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  18. Vistavette

    Vistavette Been here awhile

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    I remember walking the lot with a guy, he was lookig for a used car. The cars were not marked. As we walked he'd ask how much this one was or that one. Every time he'd say something to the effect of "too much for that". It didn't matter what car or price level. We walked by a fairly new Jaguar and again, he asked the price. I gave him a price about $20,000 LESS than anyone could hope to buy a Jag like that for. It was stupid low. Same response "too much for that".
  19. borderlinebob

    borderlinebob Been here awhile

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    Happens often.
    Here’s my absofrikkinlutly true story.
    I had taken a break from sales and was running service and parts at a small but busy marine dealer.
    I had idea on pricing on used boats and a guy got me when I was out in lot one day.
    Asked prices on a few and same response, too much—too much so I went to the real junkers and still—too much.
    As a joke and in frustration and to get rid of the guy I said
    “How about a FREE boat?”
    His eyes perked up so I took him to the long grass where there was an old lime green fibreglass piece of shit that floated but would end up costing us to haul to dump.
    He looked it over, played with the steering and controls (no motor on boat) and said
    Ready—-
    I’ll take it if you fix steering and deliver it

    I honestly forget what i said but he probably thinks I’m an asshole
    I think I asked for his address and told him to go home and wait for it to show up
    :dizave
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  20. ChopperCharles

    ChopperCharles Long timer

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    Wasn't the Prism the 3-cylinder 50mpg Geo thingy? I had a 1990 Geo Storm back in the day. Loved that car. Based on the Isuzu Impulse. It handled well, looked good (at least to my teenage self), it was very comfortable, and it had a TON of room in the hatchback. And the seats could be folded down and two people could "sleep" in the back as well, with some stolen couch cushions to make up for the ridge where the seat folded down.

    I had the base model, so not a lot of power (turning off the AC was a "turbo boost" on that car), but it was good enough that a decade or two later I bought another used one in good shape for a song and drove the wheels off it -- again. The only thing that ever really went wrong with them was the head gasket somewhere around 150k miles. But that was pretty standard for cars back then.

    Charles.